June 12, 2008
Scientists are deploying an advanced research aircraft to study a region of the atmosphere that influences climate change by affecting Earth's thermal balance. Findings will be used to improve computer models of global climate.
Photograph of three men in a hangar wroking on equipment  attached to a plane
June 10, 2008
The rate of climate warming over northern Alaska, Canada, and Russia could more than triple during periods of rapid sea ice loss, according to a new study led by NCAR.
Color image of two globes showing sea ice decline in the northern hemisphere
May 27, 2008
The convening lead authors of today's landmark government report on climate change impacts in the United States are available for comment.
Photograph of wheat, close-up
May 07, 2008
Computer analyses of global climate have consistently overstated warming in Antarctica, concludes new research by scientists at NCAR and Ohio State University.
Andrew Monaghan
April 24, 2008
A much-discussed idea to offset global warming by injecting sulfate particles into the stratosphere would have a drastic impact on Earth's protective ozone layer.
Simone Tilmes
April 21, 2008
The shrinking expanse of Arctic sea ice is increasingly vulnerable to summer sunshine, new research concludes.
Jennifer Kay
April 02, 2008
Reducing global emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) over the coming century will be more challenging than society has been led to believe, according to a new research commentary.
Photograph of Tom Wigley
February 14, 2008
A nationwide initiative starting tomorrow will enable volunteers to track climate change by observing the timing of flowers and foliage.
Photograph of yellow flowere, close-up, green background
February 12, 2008
Leading representatives from indigenous and scientific communities will take part in a landmark climate change symposium at NCAR in Boulder.
Photograph of a prairie with red barn in the distance, blue sky
February 07, 2008
Natural processes may prevent oceans from warming beyond a certain point, helping protect some coral reefs from the impacts of climate change, new research finds.
Photograph of Joan Kleypas
January 17, 2008
As the city of New Orleans struggles to rebuild from the devastation of Hurricane Katrina, researchers are learning more about weather and climate and their impacts on society.
Hurricane Katrina nears the Gulf Coast on August 28, 2005
November 01, 2007
Aiguo Dai, NCAR's Climate and Global Dynamics Division • After graduating from high school, Dai applied to the math department at China's Nanjing University. "They didn't want me, so they put me in the meteorology department instead," Aiguo says. "But I think it turned out very well for me."
Photograph of Aiguo Dai
November 01, 2007
Christopher Castro, University of Arizona • Castro always had what he calls a passing interest in weather, but he never thought of his hobby as a career path. Now he’s a professor of atmospheric science and a researcher working on better forecasts of the Southwest's torrential summer rains.
Photo of Christopher Castro
May 01, 2007
Casey Thornbrugh, University of Arizona • Mention statistics to most middle schoolers and, unless you're talking about odds for poker hands, the response is likely to be an eye roll. When Thornbrugh was in middle school, though, his hobby was climate statistics.
UCAR News Center
October 01, 2006
Peter Thornton, biogeochemist • A career in science has always felt natural to Thornton, who realized as a child that he was drawn toward analytical tasks like programming his computer.
Photo of Peter Thornton
April 01, 2006
Jielun Sun, NCAR's Mesoscale and Microscale Meteorology Division • Sun likens data analysis to a form of meditation. "It's all about discovery," she explains. "Every time I look at data, I see something and feel like I learn things."
Photo of Jielun Sun
December 01, 2005
Claudia Tebaldi, NCAR's Institute for Mathematics Applied to Geosciences • One of Claudia's favorite things about her job is working closely with the scientists who interpret the data that she analyzes. "Because I'm a statistician, I couldn't be anything but a team player," she points out.
Photo of Claudia Tebaldi
October 01, 2005
Andrew Gettelman, NCAR's Atmospheric Chemistry Division • "My job is to try to figure out how the world works," Gettelman says. "There's a lot of fun in that, as well as infinite job security, since we'll never completely figure it out."
Photo of Andrew Gettelman
January 01, 2005
Joan Kleypas, NCAR's Climate and Global Dynamics Division • "Jacques Cousteau was my idol while growing up," confesses Kleypas. The undersea world revealed in his groundbreaking television programs inspired her to become an ocean scientist.
Joan Kleypas
November 01, 2004
Britton Stephens, NCAR's Earth Observing Laboratory • Stephens became fascinated with Earth sciences during high school field trips in northeastern Oregon where he grew up.
Photo of Britt Stephens
September 01, 2004
Holland recalls that when she entered graduate school at the University of Colorado, she had "the fuzzy idea of doing something with climate." She left graduate school with a sharp focus on the role of sea ice in the climate system.
Photo of Marika Holland
May 01, 2004
Beth Holland, NCAR's Atmospheric Chemistry Division • Beth says that one of the most important things a scientist can do is communicate the results of his or her work. “I really believe in the science I’m doing and its ability to serve society.”
Photo of Beth Holland

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