December 09, 2008
Contrary to earlier projections, few developing countries will be able to afford more efficient technologies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the next few decades, new research concludes.
Photograph of pinkish gray air over a cityscape
October 08, 2008
NCAR, working with federal agencies and universities as well as the insurance and energy industries, has launched an intensive study to examine how global warming will influence hurricanes in the next few decades.
Color map of North America, Atlantic, and parts of Europe and Africa
September 24, 2008
Research by NCAR scientist Mary Hayden underscores the risk of dengue fever and the growing threat of dengue hemorrhagic fever in the Rio Grande Valley between far south Texas and northeast Mexico.
A mosquito close-up, biting someone's flesh.
September 24, 2008
NCAR scientist Brian O’Neill is building an integrated assessment model to link a range of societal factors, such as future global economic and population trends, with the physical science of climate change.
A dusty dirt road winding through dry fields.
September 24, 2008
NCAR scientists Bill Large and Steve Yeager have produced a new analysis of the exchanges of heat, momentum, and moisture between the oceans and atmosphere that should help climate modelers better assess variability on several time scales.
The sun setting over the ocean.
September 09, 2008
This year is proving unusually active for Atlantic storms. The hurricane season is only at its midpoint, but already there have been 10 named storms—which is the average number for an entire year.
August 12, 2008
Dramatic year-to-year temperature swings and a century-long warming trend across West Antarctica are linked to conditions in the tropical Pacific Ocean, according to a new analysis of ice cores conducted by scientists at NCAR and the University of Washington (UW).
June 19, 2008
The first comprehensive analysis of observed and projected changes in weather and climate extremes in North America and U.S. territories was released today.
Jerry Meehl
June 12, 2008
Scientists are deploying an advanced research aircraft to study a region of the atmosphere that influences climate change by affecting Earth's thermal balance. Findings will be used to improve computer models of global climate.
Photograph of three men in a hangar wroking on equipment  attached to a plane
June 10, 2008
The rate of climate warming over northern Alaska, Canada, and Russia could more than triple during periods of rapid sea ice loss, according to a new study led by NCAR.
Color image of two globes showing sea ice decline in the northern hemisphere
May 27, 2008
The convening lead authors of today's landmark government report on climate change impacts in the United States are available for comment.
Photograph of wheat, close-up
May 07, 2008
Computer analyses of global climate have consistently overstated warming in Antarctica, concludes new research by scientists at NCAR and Ohio State University.
Andrew Monaghan
April 24, 2008
A much-discussed idea to offset global warming by injecting sulfate particles into the stratosphere would have a drastic impact on Earth's protective ozone layer.
Simone Tilmes
April 21, 2008
The shrinking expanse of Arctic sea ice is increasingly vulnerable to summer sunshine, new research concludes.
Jennifer Kay
April 02, 2008
Reducing global emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) over the coming century will be more challenging than society has been led to believe, according to a new research commentary.
Photograph of Tom Wigley
February 14, 2008
A nationwide initiative starting tomorrow will enable volunteers to track climate change by observing the timing of flowers and foliage.
Photograph of yellow flowere, close-up, green background
February 12, 2008
Leading representatives from indigenous and scientific communities will take part in a landmark climate change symposium at NCAR in Boulder.
Photograph of a prairie with red barn in the distance, blue sky
February 07, 2008
Natural processes may prevent oceans from warming beyond a certain point, helping protect some coral reefs from the impacts of climate change, new research finds.
Photograph of Joan Kleypas
January 17, 2008
As the city of New Orleans struggles to rebuild from the devastation of Hurricane Katrina, researchers are learning more about weather and climate and their impacts on society.
Hurricane Katrina nears the Gulf Coast on August 28, 2005
November 01, 2007
Aiguo Dai, NCAR's Climate and Global Dynamics Division • After graduating from high school, Dai applied to the math department at China's Nanjing University. "They didn't want me, so they put me in the meteorology department instead," Aiguo says. "But I think it turned out very well for me."
Photograph of Aiguo Dai
November 01, 2007
Christopher Castro, University of Arizona • Castro always had what he calls a passing interest in weather, but he never thought of his hobby as a career path. Now he’s a professor of atmospheric science and a researcher working on better forecasts of the Southwest's torrential summer rains.
Photo of Christopher Castro
May 01, 2007
Casey Thornbrugh, University of Arizona • Mention statistics to most middle schoolers and, unless you're talking about odds for poker hands, the response is likely to be an eye roll. When Thornbrugh was in middle school, though, his hobby was climate statistics.
UCAR News Center
October 01, 2006
Peter Thornton, biogeochemist • A career in science has always felt natural to Thornton, who realized as a child that he was drawn toward analytical tasks like programming his computer.
Photo of Peter Thornton
April 01, 2006
Jielun Sun, NCAR's Mesoscale and Microscale Meteorology Division • Sun likens data analysis to a form of meditation. "It's all about discovery," she explains. "Every time I look at data, I see something and feel like I learn things."
Photo of Jielun Sun
December 01, 2005
Claudia Tebaldi, NCAR's Institute for Mathematics Applied to Geosciences • One of Claudia's favorite things about her job is working closely with the scientists who interpret the data that she analyzes. "Because I'm a statistician, I couldn't be anything but a team player," she points out.
Photo of Claudia Tebaldi

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