July 27, 2011
A new study involving NCAR's Bette Otto-Bliesner looks at rising sea levels during the warmth of the last interglacial period (130,000 to 120,000 years ago) and finds that melting ice sheets contributed far more to rising sea levels than thermal expansion.
An ocean wave.
July 21, 2011
If you’re an American, it’s tough to avoid corn. This ubiquitous starch turns up in soft drinks, compostable cups, and automobile fuel—and even plays a role in U.S. heat waves, including the intense one of 2011.
field of corn
July 14, 2011
Scott Denning from Colorado State University talks about bridging the gap between climate-change doubters and the science community.
June 21, 2011
The Sun drives our climate, so a slowdown in solar activity would surely put the brakes on global warming—wouldn’t it? That question percolated through the media following a set of reports from a solar physics meeting.
UCAR Magazine
June 03, 2011
A new study led by NCAR’s Wei Yu and CU-Boulder’s Weiqing Han looks at the effects of the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO), the largest source of intraseasonal (within one season) variability in the tropics, causing wet and dry periods to alternate.
Ocean waves.
June 02, 2011
How can a relatively small increase in the average temperature of the planet lead to numerous record-breaking heat waves? Part of the reason can be gleaned from a single graph.
Thumbnail of graphic showing shift in prevalence of record heat
May 12, 2011
Millions of eyes were on the wedding of Prince William and Catherine Middleton even as another major UK news story took shape—one dealing with meteorology rather than monarchy.
Depiction of European soil moisture anomalies, 10 May 2011
May 06, 2011
It’s been two decades since NOAA launched its Climate and Global Change Postdoctoral Program. The C&GC program was created in response to a lack of trained specialists, and it’s kept up with continued expansion in climate change study.
Alumni of the NOAA Climate and Global Change Postdoctoral Program
April 18, 2011
A new study looks at how the anticipated recovery of the ozone hole over Antarctica and simultaneous increase in greenhouse gas concentrations will combine to affect weather and climate in the Southern Hemisphere.
A map of the globe with atmospheric circulation patterns labeled.
April 08, 2011
Alaska is among the fastest-warming places on Earth, with its interior region warming the most statewide. A study by NCAR’s Shannon McNeeley looks at the vulnerability to climate change of native rural communities.
Alaska Natives in a boat on the river with a moose they've just killed.
March 10, 2011
Like a creature from a hydrologic horror flick, Devils Lake, North Dakota, has been expanding off and on for 70 years, most dramatically from the mid-1990s onward. Some of its tendrils have blocked rail lines and roadways for years.
Birds gather at a flooded spot in a North Dakota roadway.
March 02, 2011
Karen Akerlof at George Mason University has analyzed the treatment of climate modeling in the mass media. Are models a missing piece in climate change journalism?
Karen Akerlof, George Mason University
March 01, 2011
When climate change leaped into global consciousness more than 20 years ago, there was no doubt that sea levels would rise, but the main worry was how those rising seas would affect civilization, not on how the oceans themselves might be transformed.
Sampling coral in the Pacific near Kiribati
March 01, 2011
A study led by NCAR postdoctoral researcher Jia Hu and Julia Klein from Colorado State University looks at the relationship between plants, water, carbon, and climate on the Tibetan Plateau, which is warming at a rate twice that of the global average.
The skull of a yak with prayer flats on it and a lake and mountains behind
February 22, 2011
Last year, a team of NCAR scientists verified that the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF) can be used to depict seasonal snowfall in Colorado with a high degree of accuracy. Now the team is using WRF to forecast future snowfall.
Mountains covered in snow.
February 03, 2011
New research indicates reduced spring snowpack and warmer summer temperatures will affect wolverine habitat.
January 18, 2011
Geoengineering our climate system to ward off the effects of global warming may end up cooling the tropics to below present-day levels.
Vibrant green tropical forest.
January 13, 2011
The magnitude of climate change millions of years ago suggests that future temperatures may increase far more than projected.
December 27, 2010
New research points to more dust particles in the atmosphere than previously believed.
Color illustration of part of Earth and words
December 22, 2010
Strong jet streams often plow into the West Coast in wintertime, but the heaviest rains and snows occur when the flow dips far south over the Pacific, allowing it to bring an atmospheric river of warm, moist air from the subtropics to California.
People using rowboats on streets of Sacramento
November 23, 2010
The periodic cooling of the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean helps bring rain to Alaska and blizzards to Colorado.
UCAR Magazine | Where it's wintry and where it's not: La Niña at the helm
November 15, 2010
The new service will provide reporters with timely responses to their questions about the science of climate change.
Jeff Taylor
November 04, 2010
Crop yields are affected by many factors, including breeding, management, and climate. New research from NCAR seeks to better understand these factors and their contributions to historical yield increases, in order to anticipate future changes.
A close-up shot of corn stalks.
November 03, 2010
International collaboration has always been at the heart of COSMIC, a six-satellite network that intercepts GPS signals to measure weather, climate, and space weather variables. Now one of the leading university collaborators on COSMIC, the University of Graz, is UCAR’s latest international affiliate.
UCAR president Rick Anthes and representatives from University of Graz
November 02, 2010
Julia Slingo from the U.K. Met Office foresees physicists and mathematicians engaging with many other disciplines to provide world-class weather and climate science and services.
Julia Slingo, UK Met Office

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