February 06, 2012
When weather disasters happen, is climate change to blame? The stories, video, and interactives in "Weather on Steroids" explore that question from a number of angles. It turns out that blaming climate change for wild weather's not that simple. Here’s why.
UCAR News Center
February 06, 2012
Three ways of dusting for climate fingerprints.
Graphic showing magnifying glass and hurricane
February 06, 2012
After years of painstaking research, scientists are now developing tools to make faster connections between disastrous weather and climate science.
Lightning
February 02, 2012
A new computer modeling study from NCAR investigates how an increase in shrubs in the Arctic may affect permafrost. Over the past few decades, a warming climate has meant that the Arctic’s grassy tundra is being increasingly overtaken by shrubs.
January 30, 2012
Volcanic eruptions and resulting changes to sea ice and ocean currents may be the cause.
January 24, 2012
NCAR scientist Jerry Meehl explains the connection in this animated video.
Still from steroids-baseball-climate animation
January 23, 2012
Even as global warming coverage declines, some journalists are connecting the dots to extreme events.
A red stop sign.
January 13, 2012
The effects of a warming climate on hail are largely unknown, as global climate models are too coarse in resolution to simulate hailstorms in detail. But a new modeling study now tackles this subject, looking at the future of hail in Colorado’s Rocky Mountains over the coming decades.
A slice of hailstone on a black background.
January 04, 2012
New research led by NCAR scientist Thomas Galarneau provides an in-depth analysis of two extreme weather events whose connection may come as a surprise: Russia’s intense heat wave in summer 2010 and the heavy rains that occurred simultaneously in Pakistan.
A satellite image showing heat over Russia in bright orange.
January 03, 2012
Two climate-related indexes are helping paint a picture of the combined effects of heavy precipitation and drought.
Composite of drought-stricken land and water
November 16, 2011
It wasn't all that cold, but it certainly was wet.
Golden maple leaf casts shadow on white snow
November 15, 2011
Can we expect to see more snow—or less?
UCAR News Center
November 10, 2011
Understanding and predicting both climate variability and change—on all spatial and time scales—was the theme of the first-ever Open Science Conference of the World Climate Research Program (WCRP).
UCAR Magazine
October 21, 2011
To honor his memory and inspire continuation of his work, about 200 people gathered in late August at NCAR for the 2011 Stephen H. Schneider Symposium in celebration of his contributions to research, education, and science communication.
UCAR Magazine
October 17, 2011
Climate change is not expected to affect the extent or frequency of the El Niño/Southern Oscillation over the 21st century, but it could worsen its impacts. That’s the conclusion of a modeling study published in Journal of Climate in September.
Waves crashing near shore.
October 03, 2011
New research by a team of scientists that includes NCAR’s Marika Holland takes a close look at making seasonal forecasts of Arctic sea ice coverage.
Sea ice
September 20, 2011
The unprecedented strength of both heat and drought across Texas has echoes in climate periods of the past and projections of the future.
UCAR Magazine
September 16, 2011
Computer simulations point to ocean depths below about 1,000 feet as the main location for "missing heat."
September 08, 2011
The study underscores the complex and sometimes conflicting ways in which fossil fuel burning affects Earth’s climate.
September 07, 2011
The HIPPO field project is enabling researchers to generate the first detailed 3-D mapping of the global distribution of gases and particles that affect Earth’s climate.
September 07, 2011
A group of scholars and students from nine countries came together in Boulder this summer for two weeks of study dedicated to the world’s second largest and second most populous continent.
UCAR Magazine
September 06, 2011
A small but active group of discipline-crossing specialists are analyzing the response of disease transmission to temperature, moisture, and other atmospheric variables.
Aedes aegypti mosquito biting a human
August 31, 2011
New research that involves NCAR's Bette Otto-Bliesner questions conventional wisdom with regard to massive iceberg discharges in the North Atlantic Ocean during the last glacial period, pointing toward climate rather than ice sheet instability as a cause.
An iceberg floating in the ocean.
August 11, 2011
Sea ice could stabilize or even expand for periods of several years, but it will ultimately melt as the climate warms.
Chunks of sea ice and open water
July 27, 2011
A new study involving NCAR's Bette Otto-Bliesner looks at rising sea levels during the warmth of the last interglacial period (130,000 to 120,000 years ago) and finds that melting ice sheets contributed far more to rising sea levels than thermal expansion.
An ocean wave.

Pages

Subscribe to