October 08, 2010
Changes in population growth and composition, including aging and urbanization, could significantly affect global emissions of carbon dioxide says a new study in PNAS.
October 06, 2010
El Niño and La Niña are counterparts in the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), a cyclic warming and cooling of the eastern and central Pacific Ocean that exerts a major influence on global weather patterns, but they are not mirror images.
Ocean waves rolling into shore.
September 09, 2010
A team of scientists led by NCAR’s Keith Oleson has incorporated urban areas into a global climate model. The development is important because most models used for predicting future climate change do not account for the urban “heat island” effect.
Two satellite views of Atlanta that show urban heat island effect.
August 10, 2010
Just as the U.S. economy began a dramatic nosedive in 2007, so did the Arctic’s summertime sea ice. In the summer of 2010, the ice—much like the economy—continued to struggle.
Ice in the Chukchi Sea
August 09, 2010
In 1988, it was the spectre of Yellowstone National Park on fire. In 2003, it was the horror of thousands dying from heat in prosperous western Europe. The planet’s standout heat wave in 2010 plagued much of European Russia, including Moscow.
UCAR Magazine
July 23, 2010
In Kansas City and Tulsa, overnight lows have seldom dipped much below 80°F, with consistently oppressive humidity. Pulses of tropical air flowing north and east from the Gulf of Mexico are largely to blame.
CCSM CAM3 simulation of water vapor
June 09, 2010
As the public and political dialogue surrounding climate change heats up, UCAR's Jack Fellows finds that climate change science has never been more rigorous and exciting.
June 08, 2010
During the stormy summer of 2005, hurricanes Katrina and Rita raised concerns about the potential effects of global warming on tropical cyclones. At the same time, the Amazon rainforest was experiencing one of its most intense droughts of the last century.
River and rainforest in Amazonia
May 20, 2010
A study led by NCAR visiting scientist Erich Fischer analyzes regional climate simulations to project where heat-wave-related health risks will increase in Europe as Earth’s climate warms.
A map of western Europe with hotter areas in red and orange.
April 19, 2010
Students, gardeners, retirees, and other volunteers taking part in a nationwide initiative, Project BudBurst, are finding hints that certain plants are blooming unusually early.
Plum blossums opening on a branch
April 15, 2010
Current observational tools cannot account for roughly half of the heat that is believed to have built up on Earth in recent years.
April 02, 2010
The downpours of March suggest that the most noteworthy aspect of the Northeast’s winter was the intense precipitation rather than unusually cold air.
UCAR Magazine
March 19, 2010
A new study has verified that the Weather Research and Forecasting model can depict seasonal snowfall in Colorado with a high degree of accuracy.
Mountains with snow.
March 16, 2010
A new study finds that prescribed burns may release substantially less carbon dioxide than wildfires of the same size.
wildfire map
January 28, 2010
A new study led by NCAR scientist Peter Lawrence has found that impacts to Earth's hydrological cycle are the most important driving force in how land use changes affect climate.
Deforestation in Brazil.
January 15, 2010
Years before Congress began debating greenhouse-gas reduction, more than 500 U.S. cities had pledged to reduce their carbon footprints in line with the goals of the Kyoto Protocol. Now American cities are leading the way on adapting to climate change.
Joyce Coffee, City of Chicago
January 15, 2010
In eastern Tennessee a portrait of Earth's progression from ice age to present is taking shape. Each day, up to 100 years of climatic history unfolds. By early this year, the story will be complete, thanks to some five million processing hours on supercomputers at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.
Image showing high temperatures over Greenland and Eurasion 14,500 years ago
January 15, 2010
A growing body of research now confirms that the Montreal agreement averted at least one catastrophic form of climate change, even if others still loom. "The Montreal Protocol is a major success story," says William Randel.
British Antarctic Survey’s Halley Station
January 15, 2010
Even if the onslaught paled next to great winter outbreaks of the past, it was impressively persistent across some influential areas, including southeast England and the U.S. mid-Atlantic.
Extent of snow cover on 14 January
January 15, 2010
Clearly, the end of the Copenhagen conference isn’t the end of work on climate change—though, with regards to Winston Churchill, it might be the end of the beginning.
UCAR Magazine
January 11, 2010
Policymakers should focus on what needs to be achieved in the next 40 years in order to keep long-term options viable for avoiding dangerous levels of warming, a new study concludes.
Brian O'Neill
January 10, 2010
In a vivid example of how a small geographic feature can have far-reaching impacts on climate, new research shows that water levels in the Bering Strait helped drive global climate patterns during ice age episodes dating back more than 100,000 years.
climate patterns
January 08, 2010
No matter how you slice it, the last few weeks have been consistently wintry across large chunks of North America and Eurasia.
AO index for September 2009-January 2010
December 16, 2009
Amid the strife of the Copenhagen climate summit, one area of acknowledged progress was in ways to help preserve tropical forests and their vast stores of carbon in developing countries.
Rainforest in Congo
December 16, 2009
Sometimes the numbers just don’t add up, even when you know they need to. Attendees at the Copenhagen meeting got a taste of that as the massive meeting struggled to accommodate its guests.
UCAR Magazine

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