January 08, 2010
No matter how you slice it, the last few weeks have been consistently wintry across large chunks of North America and Eurasia.
AO index for September 2009-January 2010
December 16, 2009
Amid the strife of the Copenhagen climate summit, one area of acknowledged progress was in ways to help preserve tropical forests and their vast stores of carbon in developing countries.
Rainforest in Congo
December 16, 2009
Sometimes the numbers just don’t add up, even when you know they need to. Attendees at the Copenhagen meeting got a taste of that as the massive meeting struggled to accommodate its guests.
UCAR Magazine
December 13, 2009
A year after she was finishing a two-year appointment at NCAR, Mercy Borbor Córdova was literally on the world stage, serving as a delegate from Ecuador at the Copenhagen climate summit.
UCAR Magazine
December 10, 2009
At first glance, the Copenhagen conference seemed like an alternate universe—enormous, byzantine, and riddled with customs and folkways that weren’t at all obvious to someone who’s never been to such a meeting.
UCAR Magazine
December 06, 2009
There was a palpable sense of history in the making across Europe as some 15,000 expected participants in the Copenhagen climate conference began to converge upon the Continent.
UCAR Magazine
November 24, 2009
Even though reports continue to pour in about melting glaciers, sea ice loss, and temperatures across much of the globe remaining unusually warm, fewer and fewer Americans seem to believe the climate is warming.
Consensus and controversy:  Which makes the news?
November 18, 2009
Few other parts of the world are showing climatic trends as distinct and ominous as Australia’s—and these changes are broadly consistent with what climate models tell us the 21st century has in store for the continent.
UCAR Magazine
November 18, 2009
Diplomats from almost 200 countries met in Copenhagen, Denmark, to huddle, confer, cajole, and eventually forge the structure of a new global agreement to reduce carbon emissions.
UCAR Magazine
October 28, 2009
The presence of El Niño boosts the odds of big Denver-area snowstorms, even though the region's winters as a whole aren’t substantially wetter during El Niño. It’s a good example of nuance in the relationship between El Niño and climate.
A snow-covered bench in Louisville, CO
October 12, 2009
While most El Niños tend to inhibit Atlantic hurricanes, the Modoki variety, with its peak warming displaced further west from the Atlantic, appears to leave more room for a bumper crop in at least some years.
SSTs in eastern tropical Pacific
September 21, 2009
If you’re a gardener in New England, you might remember the wet, cool summer of 2009 for its tomatoes and potatoes, ravaged by the earliest and most widespread “late blight” on record. If you’re from south Texas, you were probably just trying to keep green things alive.
Temperature anomalies, Jul-Aug 2009, from NOAA/NCDC
September 11, 2009
Michele Rienecker—the head of NASA's Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO)—knows how challenging it is to predict El Niño.
September 03, 2009
Along with unusually persistent rains, there was a different kind of watery surprise this summer for people on the U.S. Atlantic coast. From the barrier islands of the Southeast to the rocky shores of Maine, tides ran as high as 2 feet above predicted values.
UCAR Magazine
July 16, 2009
By simulating 8,000 years of climate, a team led by scientists from the University of Wisconsin–Madison and NCAR has found a new explanation for the last major period of global warming, which occurred about 14,500 years ago.
Image of Earth showing temperature increases, researched by TraCE-21000 project
June 08, 2009
NCAR researchers are studying whether the eruption of Indonesia’s Mt. Toba supervolcano about 70,000–75,000 years ago may have cooled Earth enough to initiate an ice age and potentially alter the course of human evolution.
A satellite image.
May 27, 2009
Melting of the Greenland ice sheet may drive more water than previously thought toward the already threatened coastlines of New York, Boston, Halifax, and other cities in the northeastern United States and Canada.
Color visualization of globe with North Pole in center
May 11, 2009
One of the challenges for global climate modelers is accurately simulating cloud cover and its changes over time. This is vital for projecting future temperatures, rainfall, and other aspects of global and regional climate change.
Aerial photo of cumulus clouds
April 21, 2009
Rivers in some of the world's most populous regions are losing water, according to a new comprehensive study of global stream flow.
Color world map with bluish colors indicating more streamflow and reddish less
April 14, 2009
The threat of global warming can still be greatly diminished if nations cut emissions of heat-trapping greenhouse gases by 70 percent this century, according to a new analysis.
Global Warming: Cuts in Greenhouse Gas Emissions Would Save Arctic Ice, Reduce S
March 11, 2009
NCAR scientists are working on a bigger, bolder version of WACCM (the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model), called WACCM-eXtension, or WACCM-X for short. The enhanced version extends the model to an altitude of about 310 miles.
Coronal mass ejection
January 29, 2009
A team of scientists has successfully flown from the Arctic to the Antarctic this month, the first step in a three-year project to make the most extensive airborne measurements of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases to date.
HIAPER aircraft during the HIPPO mission
January 23, 2009
While there has been much attention focused on the question of whether climate change influences hurricanes, scientists are also interested in whether the reverse holds true: do hurricanes significantly impact global climate?
Building damaged by a hurricane
January 14, 2009
New research by NCAR scientists uses atmospheric general circulation model experiments to explore how projected losses in Arctic sea ice may affect climate.
Broken ice in the Arctic Ocean
December 12, 2008
Researchers are working toward predictions of climate change impacts in specific regions and even metropolitan areas. But are local and regional decision makers taking advantage of this science to begin to prepare for the impacts of global warming?
Photograph of Jack Fellows

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