Just Published

June 08, 2009
NCAR researchers are studying whether the eruption of Indonesia’s Mt. Toba supervolcano about 70,000–75,000 years ago may have cooled Earth enough to initiate an ice age and potentially alter the course of human evolution.
A satellite image.
May 20, 2009
A new technique developed at NCAR will help asteroseismologists learn about stars from their oscillations, or “starquakes.” These variations in the brightness of stars reveal information about their internal structures.
Kepler satellite orbiting the Sun
May 11, 2009
One of the challenges for global climate modelers is accurately simulating cloud cover and its changes over time. This is vital for projecting future temperatures, rainfall, and other aspects of global and regional climate change.
Aerial photo of cumulus clouds
May 07, 2009
Using a highly efficient modeling technique, Pablo Ortiz (University of Granada) and Piotr Smolarkiewicz (ESSL/MMM) have simulated the role of winds in forming sand dunes and sandholes.
Sand dunes in the Atacama Desert
April 14, 2009
NCAR researchers are looking at how new generations of super-fast Graphical Processing Units (GPUs) and multicore chips, such as the Cell Broadband Engine, can be used in atmospheric models.
Sky with towering cumulus clouds
April 06, 2009
The 2008 Super Tuesday tornado outbreak swept through several southern states and the lower Ohio Valley, killing 57 people. NCAR scientist Julie Demuth helped the National Weather Service assess the societal impacts of the deadly storms.
The funnel cloud of a tornado
March 18, 2009
NCAR scientists are exploring the use of a novel statistical technique to help steer intercontinental flights away from thunderstorms.
Test of one-hour prediction skill for locations of showers and thunderstorms
March 11, 2009
NCAR scientists are working on a bigger, bolder version of WACCM (the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model), called WACCM-eXtension, or WACCM-X for short. The enhanced version extends the model to an altitude of about 310 miles.
Coronal mass ejection
March 09, 2009
A team of researchers that includes NCAR’s Synte Peacock and Frank Bryan has carried out the first-ever century-long global ocean simulations with high enough resolution to capture mesoscale eddies.
Ocean wave
February 17, 2009
NCAR scientist Fei Chen is collaborating with colleagues at China’s Institute of Urban Meteorology to explore how growth in Beijing is changing the city’s summer rainfall patterns, focusing specifically on the relationship between urban expansion, aerosols, and summer rainfall.
Sunset over Beijing, China
January 23, 2009
While there has been much attention focused on the question of whether climate change influences hurricanes, scientists are also interested in whether the reverse holds true: do hurricanes significantly impact global climate?
Building damaged by a hurricane
January 14, 2009
New research by NCAR scientists uses atmospheric general circulation model experiments to explore how projected losses in Arctic sea ice may affect climate.
Broken ice in the Arctic Ocean
January 07, 2009
On November 8, 2007, scientists Giuliana de Toma and Roberto Casini noted something very unusual in observations of a solar prominence collected at NCAR's Mauna Loa Solar Observatory (MLSO). Prominences are magnetic structures that appear as clouds of cool, very dense material suspended for days or weeks in the much hotter, less dense solar corona.
A large bubble rising quickly through a stable solar prominence
December 18, 2008
NCAR postdoctoral researcher Yongku Kim is using epidemiologic data to study the effects of ozone regulation on human health. He’s leading an assessment of how various regulatory standards for ozone may affect non-accidental mortality, including respiratory-related deaths during ozone season.
Freeway filled with cars
December 15, 2008
Accurate, high-resolution weather forecasts are a critical part of wind energy production. In December, UCAR signed an agreement with Xcel Energy to develop a wind prediction system for the company’s wind energy farms in Colorado, Minnesota, and Texas.
Tall modern wind turbines in green field.
December 10, 2008
Several red-eye commercial flights were rocked by moderate to severe turbulence as they flew across northeast Kansas early on June 17, 2005. A new study by NCAR scientists Stan Trier and Bob Sharman uses modeling to connect storms in Oklahoma with the Kansas turbulence.
Flight paths across Kansas
December 04, 2008
A new UCAR COMET Program course, Weather and Health, will help meteorologists and others broaden their understanding of the impacts of weather and climate on public health.
Winter weather scene.
November 12, 2008
Lake Victoria's water levels reached a 40-year low in 2006 when East Africa was gripped by drought. A study by NCAR scientist Sean Swenson shows that drought was not the only cause of Lake Victoria's shrinkage—human management at the dam was also to blame.
A satellite image of the region around Owens Falls Dam.
September 24, 2008
Research by NCAR scientist Mary Hayden underscores the risk of dengue fever and the growing threat of dengue hemorrhagic fever in the Rio Grande Valley between far south Texas and northeast Mexico.
A mosquito close-up, biting someone's flesh.
September 24, 2008
In a potential boon for agriculture, a NASA-funded effort that involves NCAR and the private firm DTN/Meteorlogix has produced one of the world’s most accurate systems for predicting soil temperature up to two days in advance.
A colorful satellite image of the eastern United States.
September 24, 2008
NCAR scientist Brian O’Neill is building an integrated assessment model to link a range of societal factors, such as future global economic and population trends, with the physical science of climate change.
A dusty dirt road winding through dry fields.
September 24, 2008
NCAR scientists Bill Large and Steve Yeager have produced a new analysis of the exchanges of heat, momentum, and moisture between the oceans and atmosphere that should help climate modelers better assess variability on several time scales.
The sun setting over the ocean.
September 24, 2008
Research from MIRAGE (Megacities Impacts on Regional and Global Environments), a field campaign held in Mexico City in 2006, is coming to fruition as scientists begin to publish their findings. A new paper details the ozone “weekend effect” in Mexico City and its implications for local air pollution.
Cars driving through smog-filled air in a city.

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