Just Published

Weathercasters and climate change: Gary Lezak, KSHB, Kansas City
March 01, 2013
Broadcast meteorologists are a leading source of information about the atmosphere for the public, but many avoid mentioning global warming. New research finds barriers that may keep them from addressing the science of climate change on the air.
Hurricane Forecasting: Satellite image of Tropical Storm Gaston
February 25, 2013
As a step toward meeting the goal of providing earlier warnings, NCAR scientists and their colleagues are examining what enables poorly organized clusters of thunderstorms to develop into tropical storms and hurricanes.
Andean glacier melt - NCAR scientist Carl Schmitt on a Peruvian glacier.
February 04, 2013
A team of researchers, including NCAR scientist Carl Schmitt, are climbing high in the Peruvian Andes to assess the extent to which the white ice is being darkened by ash and other particulates that are emitted by nearby industrial operations. The dark particles can accelerate glacial melting, eventually threatening runoff that supplies water for millions of South American residents.
gravity waves
January 16, 2013
New research points to gravity waves, which ripple unseen through the atmosphere, as the culprit in many cases of clear-air turbulence. If those waves can be forecast, the research suggests that planes in many cases could be rerouted around them.
December 05, 2012
The new Erebus supercomputer will lead to improved Antarctic forecasts.
October 16, 2012
New observations of the magnetic field on the Sun are providing an unprecedented glimpse into solar eruptions that have serious impacts on Earth.
August 21, 2012
Accounting for clouds in weather forecasting could greatly improve road safety.
August 17, 2012
Studies show 63% of hurricane-related deaths occur inland. To help emergency managers prepare, NCAR scientists are pinpointing vulnerable populations using tropical storm winds, census data, and flood maps.
August 15, 2012
In some areas, heat from urban development could outpace warming due to greenhouse gases.
July 26, 2012
Even if climate mitigation efforts succeed, current warming trends commit us to centuries of sea level rise.

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The University Corporation for Atmospheric Research manages the National Center for Atmospheric Research under sponsorship by the National Science Foundation. Any opinions, findings and conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.

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