Just Published

Modeling a grand minimum: simulation of magnetic field behavior on the Sun shows how fields move and change
November 05, 2015
A model designed to mimic the Sun spontaneously slips into, and out of, its own grand minimum.
Tracking air pollution: view of Earth from high-orbit satellite
October 21, 2015
Scientists develop low-cost method of monitoring carbon monoxide from high-orbit satellites.
Tracking soot across Asia: Photo of smog over South Delhi
October 12, 2015
Research finds that the Indian monsoon transports black carbon pollutants across the country, with levels spiking in densely populated areas.
The HOLODEC mounted to the wing of a research aircraft.
September 30, 2015
The HOLODEC instrument uses a laser light to take a 3D image of the droplets inside a cloud.
Hurricanes development: satellite image of Tropical Storm Karl in 2010
September 08, 2015
Research may shed light on why some clusters of thunderstorms spin up into tropical storms while others dissipate.
1,000 years of the North Atlantic Oscillation: Map shows NAO conditions in negative phase
July 08, 2015
The research could move scientists closer toward projecting weather patterns in Europe months to years in advance.
Hydrologic model lets users decide: side-by-side grid and basin maps
June 17, 2015
The SUMMA model lets users make individual decisions about how to treat a vast range of variables. This customizing allows users to mimic existing models or create something entirely new.
Invisible waves visualized: still from high-resolution simulation of north-south winds about 60 miles above Earth
April 28, 2015
For the first time, an NCAR-led team of scientists have found a way to simulate the propagation of gravity waves toward space. The resulting visualization is mesmerizing to watch.
Predicting plant uptake of carbon: photo of trees and ferns in Costa Rica
April 20, 2015
A new study estimates how much carbon dioxide is likely to be absorbed by plants by the end of the century.
Thunderstorms and ozone:  A rotating supercell thunderstorm moves across northeast Colorado.
January 07, 2015
Scientists find unequivocal evidence that thunderstorms move ozone from the stratosphere down toward Earth's surface, affecting air quality and climate.

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The University Corporation for Atmospheric Research manages the National Center for Atmospheric Research under sponsorship by the National Science Foundation. Any opinions, findings and conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.

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