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August 31, 2011
New research that involves NCAR's Bette Otto-Bliesner questions conventional wisdom with regard to massive iceberg discharges in the North Atlantic Ocean during the last glacial period, pointing toward climate rather than ice sheet instability as a cause.
An iceberg floating in the ocean.
July 27, 2011
A new study involving NCAR's Bette Otto-Bliesner looks at rising sea levels during the warmth of the last interglacial period (130,000 to 120,000 years ago) and finds that melting ice sheets contributed far more to rising sea levels than thermal expansion.
An ocean wave.
June 09, 2011
Prior to massive flooding early in 2011, long-term drought plagued the Australian state of Queensland . As part of a broad research program on cloud seeding, NCAR researchers have been steadily crunching data from a 2008–09 field project that looked into how to make the clouds drop more rain on the region.
classroom scene
June 06, 2011
The solar minimum that bottomed out from 2006 to 2010 was the longest and deepest since modern space observations began. Among other effects, it reorganized the areas of flux from open magnetic field lines that produce solar wind. NCAR postdoctoral researcher Liang Zhao is using data from the last two minima to revise a model of how open magnetic flux is transported through the solar atmosphere.
Model of Sun's open magnetic field
June 03, 2011
A new study led by NCAR’s Wei Yu and CU-Boulder’s Weiqing Han looks at the effects of the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO), the largest source of intraseasonal (within one season) variability in the tropics, causing wet and dry periods to alternate.
Ocean waves.
April 18, 2011
A new study looks at how the anticipated recovery of the ozone hole over Antarctica and simultaneous increase in greenhouse gas concentrations will combine to affect weather and climate in the Southern Hemisphere.
A map of the globe with atmospheric circulation patterns labeled.
April 08, 2011
Alaska is among the fastest-warming places on Earth, with its interior region warming the most statewide. A study by NCAR’s Shannon McNeeley looks at the vulnerability to climate change of native rural communities.
Alaska Natives in a boat on the river with a moose they've just killed.
April 06, 2011
An international team of astronomers that includes NCAR’s Savita Mathur has observed mixed waves—a mixture of acoustic and gravity waves—that run all the way to the cores of red giant stars. Astronomers already knew that such waves (known as stellar oscillations) existed, but until now had only observed pure acoustic waves traveling through the outer parts of stars.
A cut-out image of the Sun showing its core.
March 02, 2011
New research indicates that a regional nuclear war would deplete Earth’s protective ozone layer so profoundly that levels of ultraviolet radiation across the world would exceed levels now considered extreme.
Map of the world with colors indicating UV indices.
March 01, 2011
A study led by NCAR postdoctoral researcher Jia Hu and Julia Klein from Colorado State University looks at the relationship between plants, water, carbon, and climate on the Tibetan Plateau, which is warming at a rate twice that of the global average.
The skull of a yak with prayer flats on it and a lake and mountains behind
February 23, 2011
A case study from NCAR looks at how coastal residents assessed their risks and made decisions leading up to Hurricane Ike.
Debris on streets.
February 22, 2011
Last year, a team of NCAR scientists verified that the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF) can be used to depict seasonal snowfall in Colorado with a high degree of accuracy. Now the team is using WRF to forecast future snowfall.
Mountains covered in snow.
February 22, 2011
A new study from NCAR uses an innovative computer model to investigate events called sudden stratospheric warmings (SSWs) in the Arctic atmosphere. The study focuses on how two atmospheric patterns based in the tropics, the El Niño–Southern Oscillation and Quasi-Biennial Oscillation, affect SSWs.
A diagram showing the layers of Earth's atmoshere.
February 15, 2011
A new NCAR study compares two different methods for forecasting power production at wind farms: turbine-based versus farm-based.
Wind turbines at sunset.
February 10, 2011
A new study by NCAR scientists looks at the accuracy of snow gauges. Making accurate measurements of snowfall is critical for weather forecasting, climate studies, and hydrology. But a combination of snow gauge geometry and weather conditions can lead to systematic measurement errors.
A close-up image of a snowflake.
January 18, 2011
Geoengineering our climate system to ward off the effects of global warming may end up cooling the tropics to below present-day levels.
Vibrant green tropical forest.
December 23, 2010
The impacts of the Antarctic ozone hole extend upward as well as downward, according to a new modeling study from a team of NCAR scientists.
A dark sky with blue clouds on the horizon.
November 30, 2010
A team of scientists is tackling a scenario that is the stuff of Hollywood thrillers: What happens if a medium-sized asteroid strikes Earth? In particular, what if it crashes into the ocean? The question is not fanciful.
A gray, pock-marked asteroid in space.
November 04, 2010
Crop yields are affected by many factors, including breeding, management, and climate. New research from NCAR seeks to better understand these factors and their contributions to historical yield increases, in order to anticipate future changes.
A close-up shot of corn stalks.
October 28, 2010
The wolverine is known for its strength and ferocity, but these qualities cannot protect it from a warming world. NCAR research suggests that this aggressive predator may struggle to survive in the contiguous United States over the coming century.
A wolverine walking across the snow, its coat glinting in the sun.
October 18, 2010
A team of NCAR scientists is studying how advanced satellite technology that measures lightning could help protect aircraft from turbulence caused by severe weather.
Lightning flashing from clouds down to the ground.
October 06, 2010
El Niño and La Niña are counterparts in the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), a cyclic warming and cooling of the eastern and central Pacific Ocean that exerts a major influence on global weather patterns, but they are not mirror images.
Ocean waves rolling into shore.
September 09, 2010
A team of scientists led by NCAR’s Keith Oleson has incorporated urban areas into a global climate model. The development is important because most models used for predicting future climate change do not account for the urban “heat island” effect.
Two satellite views of Atlanta that show urban heat island effect.
September 08, 2010
On December 20, 2008, a Boeing 737 with Continental Airlines encountered a crosswind gust during takeoff at Denver International Airport, causing it to veer off the runway. Simulations done at NCAR indicate that a mountain lee wave amplified over DIA within minutes of the accident.
Lenticular clouds at sunset over the Front Range.
August 25, 2010
NCAR scientists are collaborating with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to help fight plague in Uganda. Plague is believed to have been responsible for the Black Death pandemic that swept Europe in the 14th century, killing more than 25 million people.
Two rats crawling in a house.

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