April 08, 2011
Alaska is among the fastest-warming places on Earth, with its interior region warming the most statewide. A study by NCAR’s Shannon McNeeley looks at the vulnerability to climate change of native rural communities.
Alaska Natives in a boat on the river with a moose they've just killed.
March 10, 2011
Like a creature from a hydrologic horror flick, Devils Lake, North Dakota, has been expanding off and on for 70 years, most dramatically from the mid-1990s onward. Some of its tendrils have blocked rail lines and roadways for years.
Birds gather at a flooded spot in a North Dakota roadway.
March 02, 2011
Karen Akerlof at George Mason University has analyzed the treatment of climate modeling in the mass media. Are models a missing piece in climate change journalism?
Karen Akerlof, George Mason University
March 01, 2011
When climate change leaped into global consciousness more than 20 years ago, there was no doubt that sea levels would rise, but the main worry was how those rising seas would affect civilization, not on how the oceans themselves might be transformed.
Sampling coral in the Pacific near Kiribati
March 01, 2011
A study led by NCAR postdoctoral researcher Jia Hu and Julia Klein from Colorado State University looks at the relationship between plants, water, carbon, and climate on the Tibetan Plateau, which is warming at a rate twice that of the global average.
The skull of a yak with prayer flats on it and a lake and mountains behind
February 22, 2011
Last year, a team of NCAR scientists verified that the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF) can be used to depict seasonal snowfall in Colorado with a high degree of accuracy. Now the team is using WRF to forecast future snowfall.
Mountains covered in snow.
February 03, 2011
New research indicates reduced spring snowpack and warmer summer temperatures will affect wolverine habitat.
January 18, 2011
Geoengineering our climate system to ward off the effects of global warming may end up cooling the tropics to below present-day levels.
Vibrant green tropical forest.
January 13, 2011
The magnitude of climate change millions of years ago suggests that future temperatures may increase far more than projected.
December 27, 2010
New research points to more dust particles in the atmosphere than previously believed.
Color illustration of part of Earth and words
December 22, 2010
Strong jet streams often plow into the West Coast in wintertime, but the heaviest rains and snows occur when the flow dips far south over the Pacific, allowing it to bring an atmospheric river of warm, moist air from the subtropics to California.
People using rowboats on streets of Sacramento
November 23, 2010
The periodic cooling of the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean helps bring rain to Alaska and blizzards to Colorado.
UCAR Magazine | Where it's wintry and where it's not: La Niña at the helm
November 15, 2010
The new service will provide reporters with timely responses to their questions about the science of climate change.
Jeff Taylor
November 04, 2010
Crop yields are affected by many factors, including breeding, management, and climate. New research from NCAR seeks to better understand these factors and their contributions to historical yield increases, in order to anticipate future changes.
A close-up shot of corn stalks.
November 03, 2010
International collaboration has always been at the heart of COSMIC, a six-satellite network that intercepts GPS signals to measure weather, climate, and space weather variables. Now one of the leading university collaborators on COSMIC, the University of Graz, is UCAR’s latest international affiliate.
UCAR president Rick Anthes and representatives from University of Graz
November 02, 2010
Julia Slingo from the U.K. Met Office foresees physicists and mathematicians engaging with many other disciplines to provide world-class weather and climate science and services.
Julia Slingo, UK Met Office
November 02, 2010
Blossoming interest in geoengineering research over the last few years has ripened into a deeper consideration of the topic by scientists, policymakers, and the public. This interest has been boosted by a relative lack of action on mitigating climate change.
Eruption of Mount Pinatubo, 1991
October 28, 2010
The wolverine is known for its strength and ferocity, but these qualities cannot protect it from a warming world. NCAR research suggests that this aggressive predator may struggle to survive in the contiguous United States over the coming century.
A wolverine walking across the snow, its coat glinting in the sun.
October 19, 2010
The threat of drought is expected to increase throughout the century, potentially affecting many heavily populated regions.
Map showing projected drought risk for Africa and Europe, 2090-2099
October 08, 2010
Changes in population growth and composition, including aging and urbanization, could significantly affect global emissions of carbon dioxide says a new study in PNAS.
October 06, 2010
El Niño and La Niña are counterparts in the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), a cyclic warming and cooling of the eastern and central Pacific Ocean that exerts a major influence on global weather patterns, but they are not mirror images.
Ocean waves rolling into shore.
September 09, 2010
A team of scientists led by NCAR’s Keith Oleson has incorporated urban areas into a global climate model. The development is important because most models used for predicting future climate change do not account for the urban “heat island” effect.
Two satellite views of Atlanta that show urban heat island effect.
August 10, 2010
Just as the U.S. economy began a dramatic nosedive in 2007, so did the Arctic’s summertime sea ice. In the summer of 2010, the ice—much like the economy—continued to struggle.
Ice in the Chukchi Sea
August 09, 2010
In 1988, it was the spectre of Yellowstone National Park on fire. In 2003, it was the horror of thousands dying from heat in prosperous western Europe. The planet’s standout heat wave in 2010 plagued much of European Russia, including Moscow.
UCAR Magazine
July 23, 2010
In Kansas City and Tulsa, overnight lows have seldom dipped much below 80°F, with consistently oppressive humidity. Pulses of tropical air flowing north and east from the Gulf of Mexico are largely to blame.
CCSM CAM3 simulation of water vapor

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