March 01, 2013
Broadcast meteorologists are a leading source of information about the atmosphere for the public, but many avoid mentioning global warming. New research finds barriers that may keep them from addressing the science of climate change on the air.
Weathercasters and climate change: Gary Lezak, KSHB, Kansas City
February 19, 2013
Farmers and other stakeholders are hungry for guidance on how crops may fare as the nation’s climate evolves over the coming decades. This year’s National Climate Assessment includes new findings on agriculture and climate change that draw from collaborations between NCAR and the U.S. Department of Agriculture.
Connecting agriculture & climate: Agricultural engineer Kenneth Sudduth examines samples of grain collected by a combine
February 07, 2013
How do you determine whether some location, or the nation, is having a truly brutal winter? As it turns out, the story differs depending on whether it’s being told through events, statistics, or opinions.
How bad has your winter been? Winter scene from New England
February 04, 2013
A team of researchers, including NCAR scientist Carl Schmitt, are climbing high in the Peruvian Andes to assess the extent to which the white ice is being darkened by ash and other particulates that are emitted by nearby industrial operations. The dark particles can accelerate glacial melting, eventually threatening runoff that supplies water for millions of South American residents.
Andean glacier melt - NCAR scientist Carl Schmitt on a Peruvian glacier.
January 27, 2013
The "waste heat" generated by everyday activities in metropolitan areas alters atmospheric circulation patterns, warming or cooling temperatures across a large region.
Cities warm or cool temperatures - Photo of light from Earth at night
January 17, 2013
Two leading climate-change researchers cast new light on one of the most prominent findings of the last major IPCC report, issued in 2007.
Climate change, IPCC & aerosols - Early morning smokestacks
January 15, 2013
Even as the rest of the nation baked in 2012, Alaska froze. The contiguous 48 U.S. states saw their warmest year on record by far, but it was one of Alaska's chilliest.
Alaska cold - headlights on a highway in Fairbanks, AK
December 23, 2012
West Antarctica is experiencing nearly twice as much warming as previously thought.
Byrd
December 12, 2012
Though we’re still more than two weeks from the end of 2012, it’s not too soon to get a sense of how the year will go down in meteorological annals. Some of the signals from January to November are so strong that December won’t change the outcome.
Weather year in review-map showing U.S. heat, global warmth
November 09, 2012
NOAA has cancelled the El Niño Watch that’s been in effect since late summer (see PDF), but this doesn't guarantee a placid U.S. winter.
Snowy street in Seattle
November 08, 2012
The new study may provide a breakthrough as scientists try to narrow the range of projections of future global warming.
warming
October 08, 2012
First in the queue for the NCAR-Wyoming Yellowstone system is a set of 11 computing-intensive projects tackling major problems in Earth and atmospheric science.
Close-up depiction of solar turbulence
September 28, 2012
In recent months there’ve been hints of an El Niño on the horizon that might help quench the ongoing U.S. drought. But those hints might turn out to be as meaningless as a mirage on a parched highway.
View from research site, Kanton Island, American Samoa
August 17, 2012
Researchers ponder the implications of a massive summer storm in the Arctic Ocean that swept across a weakened ice pack.
UCAR Magazine
August 15, 2012
In some areas, heat from urban development could outpace warming due to greenhouse gases.
August 13, 2012
Until supplies approach a trickle—or a torrent—public attention seldom focuses on water issues. But water is consistently Topic A for a wide-ranging group of researchers.
Illustration comparing total global water to much tinier total freshwater
August 13, 2012
States are having to make tough decisions regarding their water use and their interaction with water. NCAR scientists are involved in collaborative projects in Colorado, Louisiana, and Oklahoma to evaluate the long-term effects of today’s decisions.
UCAR Magazine
August 13, 2012
One of the largest bodies of water in the United States, the Ogallala Aquifer, lies underground. Crucial to life in the U.S. Great Plains, it's one of many aquifers around the world under stress as water demands increase. Satellite data are now painting a richer picture of how these water stores are evolving.
faucet
August 13, 2012
As rising temperatures melt glaciers around the world, scientists are tracking the changes and helping glacier-dependent regions adapt to a changing water supply.
Glacier in Alaska
August 06, 2012
Whether you’re looking at the next few weeks or the next few decades, many parts of the United States are likely to face the silent but devastating impacts of drought.
Global map showing regions drying by 2090s
July 26, 2012
Even if climate mitigation efforts succeed, current warming trends commit us to centuries of sea level rise.
July 24, 2012
The effort to improve air quality during the 2008 summer games enabled researchers to quantify the link between traffic and carbon dioxide.
Map showing area with reduced carbon emissions
July 18, 2012
A new meta-analysis highlights the shortcomings of vulnerability studies and points to a more integrative way forward.
Street scene in St. John, Antigua
July 11, 2012
Sulfate gases emitted by the Nabro volcano boosted stratospheric particles and gas across the entire Northern Hemisphere in 2011.
Volcano: Mt. St. Augustine, Alaska

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