In Brief

Image showing high temperatures over Greenland and Eurasion 14,500 years ago
January 15, 2010
In eastern Tennessee a portrait of Earth's progression from ice age to present is taking shape. Each day, up to 100 years of climatic history unfolds. By early this year, the story will be complete, thanks to some five million processing hours on supercomputers at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.
British Antarctic Survey’s Halley Station
January 15, 2010
A growing body of research now confirms that the Montreal agreement averted at least one catastrophic form of climate change, even if others still loom. "The Montreal Protocol is a major success story," says William Randel.
A W-band radar capturing the end stages of the 5 June tornado
September 11, 2009
This spring the second Verification of the Origins of Rotation in Tornadoes Experiment (VORTEX2, or V2) captured one tornado in unprecedented detail, as well as a number of potentially tornadic thunderstorms that never made the grade.
Joachim Kuettner with sailplane
September 11, 2009
When you've been studying the ways of the atmosphere since the 1930s, you have many tales to tell. Joachim Kuettner has been sharing his life stories, including some lesser-known ones, in a new round of oral and video histories.
UCAR Magazine
September 11, 2009
In a breakthrough that will help scientists unlock mysteries of the Sun and its impacts on Earth, an international team of scientists from NCAR and the Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research has created the first-ever comprehensive computer model of sunspots.
Students catch a glimpse of the University of Wyoming King Air in flight
September 11, 2009
Eleven days can go by in no time, but their brevity was accentuated for 27 graduate students at a summer colloquium on 1–12 June. The goal was to give students a taste of fieldwork by having them organize and conduct mini–field experiments and draw meaningful results from the data.
UCAR Magazine
September 03, 2009
Along with unusually persistent rains, there was a different kind of watery surprise this summer for people on the U.S. Atlantic coast. From the barrier islands of the Southeast to the rocky shores of Maine, tides ran as high as 2 feet above predicted values.

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The University Corporation for Atmospheric Research manages the National Center for Atmospheric Research under sponsorship by the National Science Foundation. Any opinions, findings and conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.

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