In Brief

Hand holding key
June 10, 2010
New, more interactive and versatile uses of the Web are beginning to enable profound changes in the entire life cycle of scientific publications. Among these developments, one that is currently looming large in many scientists’ minds is open access.
Alice Lecinski, Phil Judge, and Don Kolinski
June 10, 2010
Between 1969 and 1971, NCAR scientist John Eddy set out to archive an important part of the history of both photography and astronomy. Eddy collected more than 100 pictures of total solar eclipses taken from the late 1800s into the mid-1900s.
Andy Heymsfield
June 10, 2010
They’ve been called “crop circles in the sky.” Across the world, sightings of oddly circular holes within cloud layers—dubbed hole-punch clouds by scientists—have triggered bemusement and speculation.
NCAR Mauna Loa Solar Observatory
June 10, 2010
NCAR’s Coronal Multichannel Polarimeter (CoMP) found a new home early this year on Hawaii’s Mauna Loa, a high-elevation paradise for astronomical observers.
Roger Wakimoto at VORTEX2
June 09, 2010
In January 2010, Roger Wakimoto was asked to direct NCAR. “Roger is a world-class scientist and administrator with broad knowledge of both the atmospheric sciences and the university community that NCAR serves,” says UCAR president Richard Anthes.
Marina LaGrave
June 08, 2010
The mysteries of the atmosphere are compelling enough to bring many into the fold of atmospheric and related science. But if you’re a first-generation college student from an underrepresented group, other factors may steer you away, according to UCAR’s Raj Pandya.
UCAR Magazine
June 08, 2010
It’s been a busy spring for community climate modeling at NCAR. One major release pushes the veteran CCSM forward. Another release is on the way: the Community Earth System Model, which brings a new paradigm into the mix.
River and rainforest in Amazonia
June 08, 2010
During the stormy summer of 2005, hurricanes Katrina and Rita raised concerns about the potential effects of global warming on tropical cyclones. At the same time, the Amazon rainforest was experiencing one of its most intense droughts of the last century.
Joanne Simpson
March 04, 2010
Atmospheric scientists around the world are mourning the loss of Joanne Simpson. The 87-year-old researcher, who upended stereotypes and made landmark contributions to meteorology, died on 4 March in Washington, DC.
UCAR Magazine
January 15, 2010
If the last few years have seen a so-called quiet Sun, its silence has spoken volumes. Researchers have taken advantage of a raft of new sensors and a special observing campaign to learn much about what happens when the sun temporarily powers down.

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*Media & nonprofit use of images: Except where otherwise indicated, media and nonprofit use permitted with credit as indicated above and compliance with UCAR's terms of use. Find more images in the NCAR|UCAR Multimedia & Image Gallery.

The University Corporation for Atmospheric Research manages the National Center for Atmospheric Research under sponsorship by the National Science Foundation. Any opinions, findings and conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.

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