May 20, 2010
A study led by NCAR visiting scientist Erich Fischer analyzes regional climate simulations to project where heat-wave-related health risks will increase in Europe as Earth’s climate warms.
A map of western Europe with hotter areas in red and orange.
May 06, 2010
A study that includes NCAR scientists suggests that plant leaves emit far less methane when exposed to sunlight than previously thought. The research estimates that foliage is the source of less than 1% of Earth’s methane emissions.
A rainforest in Tasmania, Australia, with dense green foliage.
April 19, 2010
Students, gardeners, retirees, and other volunteers taking part in a nationwide initiative, Project BudBurst, are finding hints that certain plants are blooming unusually early.
Plum blossums opening on a branch
March 19, 2010
A new study has verified that the Weather Research and Forecasting model can depict seasonal snowfall in Colorado with a high degree of accuracy.
Mountains with snow.
March 16, 2010
A new study finds that prescribed burns may release substantially less carbon dioxide than wildfires of the same size.
wildfire map
March 01, 2010
Clarence Mann, University of Michigan • Mann is crossing many boundaries on the way to a master's in environmental and land use planning. His research is creating new tools for urban planners and decision makers.
Clarence Mann (right) with NCAR technician Cliff Hiezer
January 28, 2010
A new study led by NCAR scientist Peter Lawrence has found that impacts to Earth's hydrological cycle are the most important driving force in how land use changes affect climate.
Deforestation in Brazil.
December 16, 2009
Amid the strife of the Copenhagen climate summit, one area of acknowledged progress was in ways to help preserve tropical forests and their vast stores of carbon in developing countries.
Rainforest in Congo
December 10, 2009
A collaboration of scientists that includes UCAR's John Braun is pioneering a new technique for using GPS satellite signals to measure snow depth as well as soil and vegetation moisture.
Marshall Field Site
September 10, 2009
The stretch of the subcontinent that runs from eastern Pakistan across northern India into Bangladesh is likely the world's most intensively irrigated region. A new NCAR study shows that between 2002 and 2008, the region depleted groundwater at a rate of around 13 cubic miles per year.
Side-by-side maps of India showing grounwater depletion.
June 08, 2009
NCAR researchers are studying whether the eruption of Indonesia’s Mt. Toba supervolcano about 70,000–75,000 years ago may have cooled Earth enough to initiate an ice age and potentially alter the course of human evolution.
A satellite image.
May 07, 2009
Using a highly efficient modeling technique, Pablo Ortiz (University of Granada) and Piotr Smolarkiewicz (ESSL/MMM) have simulated the role of winds in forming sand dunes and sandholes.
Sand dunes in the Atacama Desert
March 19, 2009
Volunteers across the country are welcoming spring by taking part in a nationwide initiative, known as Project BudBurst, to track climate change by recording the timing of flowers and foliage.
Photograph of ping Tulip in the snow
November 12, 2008
Lake Victoria's water levels reached a 40-year low in 2006 when East Africa was gripped by drought. A study by NCAR scientist Sean Swenson shows that drought was not the only cause of Lake Victoria's shrinkage—human management at the dam was also to blame.
A satellite image of the region around Owens Falls Dam.
September 24, 2008
In a potential boon for agriculture, a NASA-funded effort that involves NCAR and the private firm DTN/Meteorlogix has produced one of the world’s most accurate systems for predicting soil temperature up to two days in advance.
A colorful satellite image of the eastern United States.
September 24, 2008
NCAR scientists Bill Large and Steve Yeager have produced a new analysis of the exchanges of heat, momentum, and moisture between the oceans and atmosphere that should help climate modelers better assess variability on several time scales.
The sun setting over the ocean.
September 24, 2008
Mountain pine beetles appear to be doing more than killing large swaths of forests in the Rocky Mountains. Scientists suspect they are also altering local weather patterns and air quality.
Photograph of Alex Guenther looking at an instrument attached to a pine tree
September 18, 2008
Plants in a forest respond to stress by producing significant amounts of a chemical form of aspirin, scientists have discovered.
Photograph of a tower against a blue sky and tree branches in the foreground
June 01, 2008
Julien Wang, Significant Opportunities in Atmospheric Research and Science (SOARS) • When it came time to choose a major, Wang was torn between the arts and her growing interest in the environment. Finally, she chose environmental engineering. One recent project: designing a green roof.
Photograph of Julien Wang and her NCAR mentor
February 14, 2008
A nationwide initiative starting tomorrow will enable volunteers to track climate change by observing the timing of flowers and foliage.
Photograph of yellow flowere, close-up, green background
August 01, 2007
Waleska Rivera Rios, Significant Opportunities in Atmospheric Research and Science (SOARS) • In 2005, Rivera Rios was on her way to earning a doctorate in environmental science from the Universidad del Turabo in Puerto Rico.
Photograph of Waleska Rivera Rios
May 01, 2007
Casey Thornbrugh, University of Arizona • Mention statistics to most middle schoolers and, unless you're talking about odds for poker hands, the response is likely to be an eye roll. When Thornbrugh was in middle school, though, his hobby was climate statistics.
UCAR News Center
October 01, 2006
Peter Thornton, biogeochemist • A career in science has always felt natural to Thornton, who realized as a child that he was drawn toward analytical tasks like programming his computer.
Photo of Peter Thornton
January 01, 2006
David Gochis, NCAR's Research Applications Laboratory • For Gochis, a day on the job as an NCAR scientist might mean driving around the rural backroads of northern Mexico, setting up dozens of gauges the size of cookie jars that record rainfall to the nearest millimeter.
Photo of David Gochis.
June 01, 2005
Fei Chen, NCAR's Research Applications Laboratory • When the Cultural Revolution ended, people started standing in line to buy textbooks to help their children catch up on schooling. Overnight, there was huge pressure to study, as universities reopened and competition for admissions resumed.
Photo of Fei Chen

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