January 03, 2012
Two climate-related indexes are helping paint a picture of the combined effects of heavy precipitation and drought.
Composite of drought-stricken land and water
January 03, 2012
A mild morning, a frozen bird bath, and a surprisingly simple explanation.
UCAR Magazine
December 29, 2011
After almost 24 years as UCAR president, Rick Anthes reflects on what has changed, what has not, and what may change in the future.
November 16, 2011
It wasn't all that cold, but it certainly was wet.
Golden maple leaf casts shadow on white snow
November 07, 2011
The semicircular shape of the Anthes Building adds a bit of unexpected warmth to the local environment.
Reflections of the Sun against Anthes Building
September 20, 2011
The unprecedented strength of both heat and drought across Texas has echoes in climate periods of the past and projections of the future.
UCAR Magazine
September 07, 2011
According to Rick Anthes, the human and economic costs of weather-related disasters would be far greater without NOAA’s satellite and radar observations and weather forecast models.
August 22, 2011
Jonathan Vigh's Tropical Cyclone Guidance Project lets hurricane followers see the projected the path and strength of tropical cyclones.
July 21, 2011
If you’re an American, it’s tough to avoid corn. This ubiquitous starch turns up in soft drinks, compostable cups, and automobile fuel—and even plays a role in U.S. heat waves, including the intense one of 2011.
field of corn
July 14, 2011
Scott Denning from Colorado State University talks about bridging the gap between climate-change doubters and the science community.
June 28, 2011
Hazy skies and fiery sunsets were noted across much of the central United States after the huge Wallow Fire developed in Arizona. But there’s also a quantitative way to track fire’s impact on the surrounding air.
UCAR Magazine
June 21, 2011
The Sun drives our climate, so a slowdown in solar activity would surely put the brakes on global warming—wouldn’t it? That question percolated through the media following a set of reports from a solar physics meeting.
UCAR Magazine
June 02, 2011
How can a relatively small increase in the average temperature of the planet lead to numerous record-breaking heat waves? Part of the reason can be gleaned from a single graph.
Thumbnail of graphic showing shift in prevalence of record heat
May 20, 2011
An email exchange following Part I revealed the enthusiasm of the Boulder weather community for clouds and the presence of many instruments probing the atmosphere over Boulder—and, in the end, the height of the formation.
UCAR Magazine
May 12, 2011
Millions of eyes were on the wedding of Prince William and Catherine Middleton even as another major UK news story took shape—one dealing with meteorology rather than monarchy.
Depiction of European soil moisture anomalies, 10 May 2011
May 06, 2011
NCAR's Chris Davis reviews 45 years of ASP summer colloquia and looks forward to keeping the program going strong.
Chris Davis
May 06, 2011
Rick Anthes, UCAR president, looks at atmospheric predictability in general and presents some remarkable examples of recent successful experimental predictions.
Cyclone Nargis in Bay of Bengal
May 06, 2011
Clark Evans from the University of Wisconsin examines Tropical Storm Erin, the rare cyclone that actually became stronger over Oklahoma than it did over water.
May 03, 2011
Andrew Monaghan used to spend his time analyzing mathematical models of climate change in Antarctica. Now the NCAR scientist sits down with traditional healers in remote villages in Uganda.
UCAR Magazine
April 28, 2011
How could a tornado outbreak kill more than 200 people? Several factors—meteorological, geographical, and sociological—came together in a rare and deadly way.
UCAR Magazine
March 30, 2011
A finely textured cloud leads to an informal investigation and a lively scientific debate over how it formed.
Mysterious cloud over Boulder, Colorado, 23 March 2011
March 23, 2011
The return of sunlight in polar spring means ozone destruction above the Antarctic—and, in 2011, above the Arctic.
A high-resolution infrared Fourier transform spectrometer is pictured.
March 10, 2011
Like a creature from a hydrologic horror flick, Devils Lake, North Dakota, has been expanding off and on for 70 years, most dramatically from the mid-1990s onward. Some of its tendrils have blocked rail lines and roadways for years.
Birds gather at a flooded spot in a North Dakota roadway.
March 02, 2011
Rick Anthes asks if future scientific breakthroughs and technological innovation will be "Made in China."
Richard Anthes on the Zhongnanhai (Chinese White House) campus in Beijing
March 02, 2011
Karen Akerlof at George Mason University has analyzed the treatment of climate modeling in the mass media. Are models a missing piece in climate change journalism?
Karen Akerlof, George Mason University

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