News from UCAR Members

News from UCAR Members & Affiliates

 

A tool commonly used by financial strategists to determine what shares to purchase to create a diversified stock portfolio was used to develop a diversified portfolio of another kind -- land to be set aside for conservation purposes given the uncertainty about climate change.

Financial tool

Tornado/Microburst Simulator runs over a 3-D model of a two-mile by three-mile section of rough Alabama countryside.

Iowa State University's Tornado/Microburst Simulator

Chemists have found a smoking gun proving that increased fertilizer use over the past 50 years is responsible for a dramatic rise in atmospheric nitrous oxide.

The Cape Grim Baseline Air Pollution Station in Tasmania

The early arrival of spring across the U.S. undoubtedly has warmed the hearts of many people, but for flowering plants and pollinating insects, the trend toward earlier springs brings complicated, and not always good, results.

A Mormon Fritillary butterfly

Global warming has forced alpine chipmunks in Yosemite to higher ground, prompting a startling decline in the species’ genetic diversity.

alpine chipmunk

A hemispherewide phenomenon – and not just regional forces – has caused record-breaking amounts of freshwater to accumulate in the Arctic’s Beaufort Sea.

Path of Russian river water into the Canada Basin

Trees are dying in the Sahel, a region in Africa south of the Sahara Desert, and human-caused climate change is to blame.

A dead ironwood tree

University of Miami researchers have climate scientists rethinking a commonly held theory about the ocean's role in the global climate system.

Amy Clement

In this era of environmental consciousness, many buildings are being outfitted to “go green.” An associate professor of fine arts at Rutgers-Camden, is taking the term quite literally.

Lichen is a versatile combination of fungi and algae

Rivers and streams in the United States are releasing enough carbon into the atmosphere to fuel 3.4 million car trips to the moon, according to Yale researchers in Nature Geoscience.

River

Warming streams could spell the end of spring-run Chinook salmon in California by the end of the century, according to a study by scientists at UC Davis, the Stockholm Environment Institute and the National Center for Atmospheric Research.

Spring-run Chinook salmon

Air from laundry machines using the top-selling scented liquid detergent and dryer sheet contains hazardous chemicals, including two that are classified as carcinogens.

laundry basket

Climate is changing fire patterns in the west in a way that could markedly change the face of Yellowstone National Park, according to new research.

Wildfire

Stanford researchers say climate change will put the squeeze on many California premium wine grape growers, but a new study recommends steps to keep their vineyards from suffering.

Wine grapes

University of Minnesota engineering researchers discover new source for generating 'green' electricity.

Martin Saar, an Earth sciences faculty member

Large areas of the globe are likely to warm up so quickly that by the middle of this century even the coolest summers will be hotter than the hottest summers of the past 50 years.

Increased greenhouse gas emissions could lead to permanently hotter summers

It may not be possible to prevent total destruction from the most powerful tornadoes such as those which just struck the South, but better building practices and code enforcement could help with the lesser storms.

Roof collapse

Technologies for removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere are unlikely to offer an economically feasible way to slow human-driven climate change for several decades.

carbon dioxide emmision

The huge tsunami triggered by the 9.0 Tohoku Earthquake destroyed coastal towns, washing such things as houses and cars into the ocean. Projections of where this debris might head have been made.

The mass of debris stretches for miles off the Honshu Coast

With birds chirping and temperatures warming , spring is finally in the air. But for University of Toronto Scarborough (UTSC) environmental chemist Torsten Meyer, springtime has a dark side.

Tulip in spring snow

Pages

Subscribe to News from UCAR Members