AMS honorees announced

Eight NCAR and UCAR staff join the ranks of American Meteorological Society honorees

Eight scientists from NCAR and UCAR have won special honors from the American Meteorological Society (AMS), garnering several of the most prestigious awards in the atmospheric sciences.

"The large number of award winners demonstrates the extent to which NCAR and UCAR are important leaders in our field," said NCAR Director James Hurrell. "Working with collaborators throughout the research community, these scientists are gaining new understanding of critical atmospheric processes in ways that will advance prediction and better protect society."

The AMS, which has more than 13,000 members, is the nation's premier scientific and professional organization for the atmospheric and related sciences. It is presenting the awards to 74 individuals and five organizations. The winners will be recognized at a ceremony in January at the AMS annual meeting in Seattle. Click here for more on this year’s AMS Fellows and other award winners.

NCAR and UCAR's new AMS honorees are:

Peggy LeMoneMargaret "Peggy" LeMone (Honorary Member of the AMS). LeMone, an MMM senior scientist emerita and former AMS president, is being recognized by the society as a person of "acknowledged preeminence" in atmospheric science. An expert on storm structure and the interaction of the boundary layer with clouds and the surface, she served as chief scientist of the worldwide GLOBE science and education program and is the author or co-author of nearly 200 peer-reviewed papers.
Richard RotunnoRichard Rotunno (Carl-Gustaf Rossby Research Medal). Rotunno, an MMM senior scientist, is a leading expert in tornadoes and other severe storms, using theory and computer modeling to develop the understanding needed to improve forecasts. He won the Rossby medal — the top AMS honor — for "elegant, rigorous work that has fundamentally increased our understanding of mesoscale and synoptic-scale dynamics, especially the role of vorticity in the atmosphere."
Sergey SokolovskiySergey V. Sokolovskiy (Verner E. Suomi Award). Sokolovskiy is a scientist with the UCAR COSMIC program, which uses a satellite-based GPS technology known as radio occultation to measure atmospheric parameters for weather, climate, and space weather applications. He won "for exceptional theoretical and practical contributions to the science and application of radio occultation observations of Earth’s atmosphere."
Jennifer Kay
Jennifer Kay (Henry Houghton Award). Kay, a visiting NCAR scientist and University of Colorado Boulder professor, uses observations and computer models to better understand climate variability and change. She won the award "for the innovative use of observations and global climate models to better understand the rapidly evolving climate of the polar regions."

 

Scott EllisScott Ellis (Editor's Award). EOL scientist Scott Ellis is a radar specialist who focuses on field campaigns and data analysis. An editor of the "Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology," Ellis won "for consistently excellent reviews."
Mary BarthMary Barth (AMS Fellow). AMS Fellows are recognized for "outstanding contributions" to the atmospheric or related sciences over several years. Barth, an ACOM senior scientist, focuses on interactions between clouds and atmospheric chemistry. Her research, which draws on atmospheric measurements and computer models, sheds light on the effect of storms on gases and particles in the atmosphere that can affect weather and climate.
Robert SharmanRobert Sharman (AMS Fellow). Sharman is a RAL scientist who specializes in atmospheric turbulence and its effect on aircraft. His work, with the Federal Aviation Administration and the airline industry, seeks to better predict turbulence and safely guide aircraft away from it.
Christine WiedinmyerThe AMS granted a special award to the Earth Science Women's Network. Co-founded by ACOM scientist Christine Wiedinmyer, the network is dedicated to career development, peer mentoring, and community building for women in the geosciences. The network, which has grown since its founding in 2002 to more than 2,900 members, won "for inspirational commitment to broadening the participation of women in the Earth sciences, providing a supportive environment for peer mentoring and professional development."