Staff Notes Daily Calendar Events

Tuesday, July 11, 2017 - 9:00am

2017 Joint DTC-EMC-JCSDA GSI-EnKF Tutorial

11-14 July, 2017 at the NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction (NCWCP) conference center in College Park, MD.

The combined Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) and Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) Data Assimilation (DA) System Community Tutorial is co-hosted by the Developmental Testbed Center (DTC), the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Environmental Modeling Center (EMC), and the Joint Center for Satellite Data Assimilation (JCSDA).

The tutorial consists of three days of lectures (Tuesday-Thursday) and four hands-on practical sessions (Tuesday-Friday) where the Friday practical session is optional. The invited speakers are from the primary GSI and EnKF development teams, including DA experts from NOAA, JCSDA, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), University of Maryland and the DTC. The practical sessions will provide the essential skills to run the GSI/EnKF system with basic and advanced implementations.

Basic knowledge of numerical weather prediction (NWP) models (e.g., WRF, GFS) and DA, as well as essential skills in Fortran and Unix, are required for the class.

There are registration fees associated with the GSI/EnKF Tutorial to cover necessary material costs and other expenses.

  • Tutorial (both lecture and practical sessions): $190 (includes a USB flash drive with copy of lectures and morning and afternoon refreshments). Please bring a personal laptop for the practical sessions.
  • Tutorial Lecture only (no practical sessions): $110 (includes a USB flash drive with copy of lectures and morning refreshments for three days

Registration deadlines:

  • 9 June, 2017: Registration closes for non-US citizens (excluding NCWCP residents with NOAA CAC cards). Additional paperwork is needed for non-US citizens to enter the NCWCP building and it takes about one month to process the paperwork. We recommend people register ASAP.
  • 20 June, 2017: Register closes for US citizens and NCWCP residents (with NOAA CAC card).

For more information and to register please visit: http://www.dtcenter.org/com-GSI/users.v3.5/tutorials/2017/index.php 

Type of event:
Tutorial/Training

Posted by Jessa Johnson (jessaj@ucar.edu) at x2751
Hosting lab/division or program:
DTC
Will this event be webcast?
No
Wednesday, July 12, 2017 - 9:00am

2017 Joint DTC-EMC-JCSDA GSI-EnKF Tutorial

11-14 July, 2017 at the NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction (NCWCP) conference center in College Park, MD.

The combined Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) and Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) Data Assimilation (DA) System Community Tutorial is co-hosted by the Developmental Testbed Center (DTC), the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Environmental Modeling Center (EMC), and the Joint Center for Satellite Data Assimilation (JCSDA).

The tutorial consists of three days of lectures (Tuesday-Thursday) and four hands-on practical sessions (Tuesday-Friday) where the Friday practical session is optional. The invited speakers are from the primary GSI and EnKF development teams, including DA experts from NOAA, JCSDA, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), University of Maryland and the DTC. The practical sessions will provide the essential skills to run the GSI/EnKF system with basic and advanced implementations.

Basic knowledge of numerical weather prediction (NWP) models (e.g., WRF, GFS) and DA, as well as essential skills in Fortran and Unix, are required for the class.

There are registration fees associated with the GSI/EnKF Tutorial to cover necessary material costs and other expenses.

  • Tutorial (both lecture and practical sessions): $190 (includes a USB flash drive with copy of lectures and morning and afternoon refreshments). Please bring a personal laptop for the practical sessions.
  • Tutorial Lecture only (no practical sessions): $110 (includes a USB flash drive with copy of lectures and morning refreshments for three days

Registration deadlines:

  • 9 June, 2017: Registration closes for non-US citizens (excluding NCWCP residents with NOAA CAC cards). Additional paperwork is needed for non-US citizens to enter the NCWCP building and it takes about one month to process the paperwork. We recommend people register ASAP.
  • 20 June, 2017: Register closes for US citizens and NCWCP residents (with NOAA CAC card).

For more information and to register please visit: http://www.dtcenter.org/com-GSI/users.v3.5/tutorials/2017/index.php 

Type of event:
Tutorial/Training

Posted by Jessa Johnson (jessaj@ucar.edu) at x2751
Hosting lab/division or program:
DTC
Will this event be webcast?
No
Thursday, July 13, 2017 - 9:00am

2017 Joint DTC-EMC-JCSDA GSI-EnKF Tutorial

11-14 July, 2017 at the NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction (NCWCP) conference center in College Park, MD.

The combined Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) and Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) Data Assimilation (DA) System Community Tutorial is co-hosted by the Developmental Testbed Center (DTC), the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Environmental Modeling Center (EMC), and the Joint Center for Satellite Data Assimilation (JCSDA).

The tutorial consists of three days of lectures (Tuesday-Thursday) and four hands-on practical sessions (Tuesday-Friday) where the Friday practical session is optional. The invited speakers are from the primary GSI and EnKF development teams, including DA experts from NOAA, JCSDA, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), University of Maryland and the DTC. The practical sessions will provide the essential skills to run the GSI/EnKF system with basic and advanced implementations.

Basic knowledge of numerical weather prediction (NWP) models (e.g., WRF, GFS) and DA, as well as essential skills in Fortran and Unix, are required for the class.

There are registration fees associated with the GSI/EnKF Tutorial to cover necessary material costs and other expenses.

  • Tutorial (both lecture and practical sessions): $190 (includes a USB flash drive with copy of lectures and morning and afternoon refreshments). Please bring a personal laptop for the practical sessions.
  • Tutorial Lecture only (no practical sessions): $110 (includes a USB flash drive with copy of lectures and morning refreshments for three days

Registration deadlines:

  • 9 June, 2017: Registration closes for non-US citizens (excluding NCWCP residents with NOAA CAC cards). Additional paperwork is needed for non-US citizens to enter the NCWCP building and it takes about one month to process the paperwork. We recommend people register ASAP.
  • 20 June, 2017: Register closes for US citizens and NCWCP residents (with NOAA CAC card).

For more information and to register please visit: http://www.dtcenter.org/com-GSI/users.v3.5/tutorials/2017/index.php 

Type of event:
Tutorial/Training

Posted by Jessa Johnson (jessaj@ucar.edu) at x2751
Hosting lab/division or program:
DTC
Will this event be webcast?
No
Friday, July 14, 2017 - 9:00am

2017 Joint DTC-EMC-JCSDA GSI-EnKF Tutorial

11-14 July, 2017 at the NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction (NCWCP) conference center in College Park, MD.

The combined Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) and Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) Data Assimilation (DA) System Community Tutorial is co-hosted by the Developmental Testbed Center (DTC), the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Environmental Modeling Center (EMC), and the Joint Center for Satellite Data Assimilation (JCSDA).

The tutorial consists of three days of lectures (Tuesday-Thursday) and four hands-on practical sessions (Tuesday-Friday) where the Friday practical session is optional. The invited speakers are from the primary GSI and EnKF development teams, including DA experts from NOAA, JCSDA, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), University of Maryland and the DTC. The practical sessions will provide the essential skills to run the GSI/EnKF system with basic and advanced implementations.

Basic knowledge of numerical weather prediction (NWP) models (e.g., WRF, GFS) and DA, as well as essential skills in Fortran and Unix, are required for the class.

There are registration fees associated with the GSI/EnKF Tutorial to cover necessary material costs and other expenses.

  • Tutorial (both lecture and practical sessions): $190 (includes a USB flash drive with copy of lectures and morning and afternoon refreshments). Please bring a personal laptop for the practical sessions.
  • Tutorial Lecture only (no practical sessions): $110 (includes a USB flash drive with copy of lectures and morning refreshments for three days

Registration deadlines:

  • 9 June, 2017: Registration closes for non-US citizens (excluding NCWCP residents with NOAA CAC cards). Additional paperwork is needed for non-US citizens to enter the NCWCP building and it takes about one month to process the paperwork. We recommend people register ASAP.
  • 20 June, 2017: Register closes for US citizens and NCWCP residents (with NOAA CAC card).

For more information and to register please visit: http://www.dtcenter.org/com-GSI/users.v3.5/tutorials/2017/index.php 

Type of event:
Tutorial/Training

Posted by Jessa Johnson (jessaj@ucar.edu) at x2751
Hosting lab/division or program:
DTC
Will this event be webcast?
No
Monday, July 17, 2017 - 8:00am

The triennial IUFRO conference on the effect of wind and trees will take place at the National Center for Atmospheric Research’s (NCAR) Mesa Laboratory in Boulder, Colorado, from 17 July to 21 July 2017 

Call for Abstracts 

This conference encourages scientists from all backgrounds with an interest in the interaction between wind and trees to present a paper. The broad theme of the conference targets understanding the interaction of the wind on trees at scales ranging from the leaf to entire forests and forested landscapes. We are interested in how trees adapt to wind, how they acclimate during their lives, and the physical mechanisms of wind damage. Presentations discussing the atmospheric processes producing damaging near-surface winds and climatological controls on their likelihood are also encouraged.  We are keenly interested in the impact of forest disturbance on carbon budgets and ecosystem functioning in forests and management strategies to mitigate the impact of damage in all types of forestry.   

The deadline for submitting an abstract is 17 February 2017. 

https://www.regonline.com/IUFROWT

Type of event:
Workshop
Building:
Mesa Lab
Room:
132 - Main Seminar Room

Posted by Kris Marwitz (kmarwitz@ucar.edu) at x8198
Hosting lab/division or program:
MMM
Will this event be webcast?
No
Tuesday, July 18, 2017 - 8:00am

The triennial IUFRO conference on the effect of wind and trees will take place at the National Center for Atmospheric Research’s (NCAR) Mesa Laboratory in Boulder, Colorado, from 17 July to 21 July 2017 

Call for Abstracts 

This conference encourages scientists from all backgrounds with an interest in the interaction between wind and trees to present a paper. The broad theme of the conference targets understanding the interaction of the wind on trees at scales ranging from the leaf to entire forests and forested landscapes. We are interested in how trees adapt to wind, how they acclimate during their lives, and the physical mechanisms of wind damage. Presentations discussing the atmospheric processes producing damaging near-surface winds and climatological controls on their likelihood are also encouraged.  We are keenly interested in the impact of forest disturbance on carbon budgets and ecosystem functioning in forests and management strategies to mitigate the impact of damage in all types of forestry.   

The deadline for submitting an abstract is 17 February 2017. 

https://www.regonline.com/IUFROWT

Type of event:
Workshop
Building:
Mesa Lab
Room:
132 - Main Seminar Room

Posted by Kris Marwitz (kmarwitz@ucar.edu) at x8198
Hosting lab/division or program:
MMM
Will this event be webcast?
No
Wednesday, July 19, 2017 - 8:00am

The triennial IUFRO conference on the effect of wind and trees will take place at the National Center for Atmospheric Research’s (NCAR) Mesa Laboratory in Boulder, Colorado, from 17 July to 21 July 2017 

Call for Abstracts 

This conference encourages scientists from all backgrounds with an interest in the interaction between wind and trees to present a paper. The broad theme of the conference targets understanding the interaction of the wind on trees at scales ranging from the leaf to entire forests and forested landscapes. We are interested in how trees adapt to wind, how they acclimate during their lives, and the physical mechanisms of wind damage. Presentations discussing the atmospheric processes producing damaging near-surface winds and climatological controls on their likelihood are also encouraged.  We are keenly interested in the impact of forest disturbance on carbon budgets and ecosystem functioning in forests and management strategies to mitigate the impact of damage in all types of forestry.   

The deadline for submitting an abstract is 17 February 2017. 

https://www.regonline.com/IUFROWT

Type of event:
Workshop
Building:
Mesa Lab
Room:
132 - Main Seminar Room

Posted by Kris Marwitz (kmarwitz@ucar.edu) at x8198
Hosting lab/division or program:
MMM
Will this event be webcast?
No
Thursday, July 20, 2017 - 8:00am

The triennial IUFRO conference on the effect of wind and trees will take place at the National Center for Atmospheric Research’s (NCAR) Mesa Laboratory in Boulder, Colorado, from 17 July to 21 July 2017 

Call for Abstracts 

This conference encourages scientists from all backgrounds with an interest in the interaction between wind and trees to present a paper. The broad theme of the conference targets understanding the interaction of the wind on trees at scales ranging from the leaf to entire forests and forested landscapes. We are interested in how trees adapt to wind, how they acclimate during their lives, and the physical mechanisms of wind damage. Presentations discussing the atmospheric processes producing damaging near-surface winds and climatological controls on their likelihood are also encouraged.  We are keenly interested in the impact of forest disturbance on carbon budgets and ecosystem functioning in forests and management strategies to mitigate the impact of damage in all types of forestry.   

The deadline for submitting an abstract is 17 February 2017. 

https://www.regonline.com/IUFROWT

Type of event:
Workshop
Building:
Mesa Lab
Room:
132 - Main Seminar Room

Posted by Kris Marwitz (kmarwitz@ucar.edu) at x8198
Hosting lab/division or program:
MMM
Will this event be webcast?
No
Friday, July 21, 2017 - 8:00am

The triennial IUFRO conference on the effect of wind and trees will take place at the National Center for Atmospheric Research’s (NCAR) Mesa Laboratory in Boulder, Colorado, from 17 July to 21 July 2017 

Call for Abstracts 

This conference encourages scientists from all backgrounds with an interest in the interaction between wind and trees to present a paper. The broad theme of the conference targets understanding the interaction of the wind on trees at scales ranging from the leaf to entire forests and forested landscapes. We are interested in how trees adapt to wind, how they acclimate during their lives, and the physical mechanisms of wind damage. Presentations discussing the atmospheric processes producing damaging near-surface winds and climatological controls on their likelihood are also encouraged.  We are keenly interested in the impact of forest disturbance on carbon budgets and ecosystem functioning in forests and management strategies to mitigate the impact of damage in all types of forestry.   

The deadline for submitting an abstract is 17 February 2017. 

https://www.regonline.com/IUFROWT

Type of event:
Workshop
Building:
Mesa Lab
Room:
132 - Main Seminar Room

Posted by Kris Marwitz (kmarwitz@ucar.edu) at x8198
Hosting lab/division or program:
MMM
Will this event be webcast?
No
Monday, July 17, 2017 - 8:00am

Applications are now being accepted for the 2017 NCAR/CDC Workshop on Climate and Health. This workshop will converge on both environmental health and vector-borne diseases related to human health and the uncertainty inherent in weather, climate and health systems. The purpose of the workshop is to train health professionals and early career climate and health researchers (public health officials, graduate students, post-docs and early career scientists and faculty) in the development of robust interdisciplinary research projects in this complex arena. The 3.5-day workshop will focus on adaptation strategies in key emergent areas such as early warning systems, the integration of weather and climate into surveillance systems, and community level initiatives and tools for decision-makers. There will be multiple opportunities for discussions with experts in the field in order to bring public health academicians and practitioners and atmospheric scientists together to examine the integration of epidemiology, ecology, behavioral science, modeling and atmospheric science.

More information and Application Link
Direct questions to:
Mary Hayden (mhayden@ucar.edu)
or
Ben Beard (cbb0@cdc.gov)

Type of event:
Workshop
Building:
CG1
Room:
Auditorium

Posted by Lara Ziady (ziady@ucar.edu) at x8442
Hosting lab/division or program:
CSAP
Will this event be webcast?
No
Tuesday, July 18, 2017 - 8:00am

Applications are now being accepted for the 2017 NCAR/CDC Workshop on Climate and Health. This workshop will converge on both environmental health and vector-borne diseases related to human health and the uncertainty inherent in weather, climate and health systems. The purpose of the workshop is to train health professionals and early career climate and health researchers (public health officials, graduate students, post-docs and early career scientists and faculty) in the development of robust interdisciplinary research projects in this complex arena. The 3.5-day workshop will focus on adaptation strategies in key emergent areas such as early warning systems, the integration of weather and climate into surveillance systems, and community level initiatives and tools for decision-makers. There will be multiple opportunities for discussions with experts in the field in order to bring public health academicians and practitioners and atmospheric scientists together to examine the integration of epidemiology, ecology, behavioral science, modeling and atmospheric science.

More information and Application Link
Direct questions to:
Mary Hayden (mhayden@ucar.edu)
or
Ben Beard (cbb0@cdc.gov)

Type of event:
Workshop
Building:
CG1
Room:
Auditorium

Posted by Lara Ziady (ziady@ucar.edu) at x8442
Hosting lab/division or program:
CSAP
Will this event be webcast?
No
Wednesday, July 19, 2017 - 8:00am

Applications are now being accepted for the 2017 NCAR/CDC Workshop on Climate and Health. This workshop will converge on both environmental health and vector-borne diseases related to human health and the uncertainty inherent in weather, climate and health systems. The purpose of the workshop is to train health professionals and early career climate and health researchers (public health officials, graduate students, post-docs and early career scientists and faculty) in the development of robust interdisciplinary research projects in this complex arena. The 3.5-day workshop will focus on adaptation strategies in key emergent areas such as early warning systems, the integration of weather and climate into surveillance systems, and community level initiatives and tools for decision-makers. There will be multiple opportunities for discussions with experts in the field in order to bring public health academicians and practitioners and atmospheric scientists together to examine the integration of epidemiology, ecology, behavioral science, modeling and atmospheric science.

More information and Application Link
Direct questions to:
Mary Hayden (mhayden@ucar.edu)
or
Ben Beard (cbb0@cdc.gov)

Type of event:
Workshop
Building:
CG1
Room:
Auditorium

Posted by Lara Ziady (ziady@ucar.edu) at x8442
Hosting lab/division or program:
CSAP
Will this event be webcast?
No
Thursday, July 20, 2017 - 8:00am

Applications are now being accepted for the 2017 NCAR/CDC Workshop on Climate and Health. This workshop will converge on both environmental health and vector-borne diseases related to human health and the uncertainty inherent in weather, climate and health systems. The purpose of the workshop is to train health professionals and early career climate and health researchers (public health officials, graduate students, post-docs and early career scientists and faculty) in the development of robust interdisciplinary research projects in this complex arena. The 3.5-day workshop will focus on adaptation strategies in key emergent areas such as early warning systems, the integration of weather and climate into surveillance systems, and community level initiatives and tools for decision-makers. There will be multiple opportunities for discussions with experts in the field in order to bring public health academicians and practitioners and atmospheric scientists together to examine the integration of epidemiology, ecology, behavioral science, modeling and atmospheric science.

More information and Application Link
Direct questions to:
Mary Hayden (mhayden@ucar.edu)
or
Ben Beard (cbb0@cdc.gov)

Type of event:
Workshop
Building:
CG1
Room:
Auditorium

Posted by Lara Ziady (ziady@ucar.edu) at x8442
Hosting lab/division or program:
CSAP
Will this event be webcast?
No
Monday, June 26, 2017 - 3:30pm

ACOM Seminar

Holistic Interactions of Shallow Clouds, Aerosols, and Land-Ecosystems (HI-SCALE) Campaign: Objectives, Measurements Strategy, and Preliminary Findings

Jerome Fast
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Abstract:

This talk describes the objectives, measurement strategy, and preliminary findings from the Holistic Interactions of Shallow Clouds, Aerosols, and Land-Ecosystems (HI-SCALE) campaign that was conducted in May and September of 2016 near the DOE’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site located in Oklahoma. Current shallow and deep convective cloud parameterizations used by regional and global models contain uncertainties resulting from insufficient coincident data that couples cloud macrophysical and microphysical properties to inhomogeneity in land use and ecosystems, boundary layer turbulence, and aerosol properties. Rather than targeting a narrow set of processes, the goal of the HI-SCALE campaign was to provide a detailed set of aircraft and surface measurements needed to obtain a more complete understanding and improved parameterizations of the lifecycle of shallow clouds. Aerosol and aerosol precursor measurements on the research aircraft included a High Resolution Time-of- Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF- AMS), a single particle mass spectrometer (miniSPLAT), various size distribution instruments, a cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) particle counter, a chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS), as well as O3, SO2 , NO, NO2 , and CO. Similar measurements were continuously collected at the surface. The sampling was done in two periods, one in the spring and the other in the late summer to take advantage of variations in the “greenness” for various types of vegetation, new particle formation, anthropogenic enhancement of biogenic secondary organic aerosol (SOA), and other aerosol properties.

Preliminary findings using the HI-SCALE data will be presented. The aircraft measurements will be coupled with extensive routine ARM SGP measurements as well as Large Eddy Simulation (LES), cloud resolving, and cloud-system resolving models. Ultimately, these integrated analyses and modeling studies will shed light on the effects of inhomogeneity in land use, vegetation, soil moisture, convective eddies, and aerosol properties (size distribution, composition, mixing state) on the evolution of shallow clouds. This includes the feedbacks of cloud radiative effects on the surface heat, moisture, and momentum fluxes and on aerosol photochemical processes via changes in the downwelling radiation.

Monday, 26 June 2017, 3:30pm
NCAR Foothills Laboratory
3450 Mitchell Lane, Boulder
FL2-1001, Small Auditorium
Live webcast: http://ucarconnect.ucar.edu/live

Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
FL2
Room:
1001

Posted by Bonnie Slagel (bonnie@ucar.edu) at x8318
Hosting lab/division or program:
ACOM
Will this event be webcast?
Thursday, July 6, 2017 - 3:30pm

Ying Pan
NCAR/MMM/ASP 

The boundary layer near the Earth’s surface is the region in which we spend most of our lives. The scales of turbulent motions in atmospheric and oceanic boundary layers are typically smaller than the horizontal grid spacing of regional and global models, calling for parameterization schemes describing the net effect of these subgrid-scale motions. My vision is to bridge the theoretical understanding of turbulent boundary layers and the demands from regional and global models. 

The theoretical understanding of turbulent boundary layers cannot bypass the local integral scale that characterizes the most energetic turbulent motions. In this work, theoretical, experimental, and numerical approaches are combined to solve the puzzle of the local integral scale for typical environmental flows. A theoretical framework is established without making assumptions about temperature stratification and the balance between production and dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy (TKE). The theoretical models are confirmed for two types of boundary layers: (i) above a homogeneous surface where temperature stratification either produces or destructs TKE, and (ii) above a plant canopy where the produced TKE is efficiently transported downward. 

Validating the theoretical model requires both experimental data and numerical simulations. Because the definition of time-averaged statistics used in theories require stationary conditions, this work constructs a novel approach that determines both the occurrence and the duration of stationary periods from long-term dataset sampled at multiple locations. In the presence of plant canopies, numerical simulation is needed as an intermediate method to bridge theoretical predictions and observational data. A large-eddy simulation study has shown that representing the flexibility of plants is critical to successful reproduction of turbulent fluxes carried by upward and downward events. The outcome of these theoretical, experimental, and numerical studies can be extended to various research work involving turbulent boundary layers, including turbulent fluxes in nonstationary environments, fluid-structure interactions, and sustainable agricultural practices.

Refreshments: 3:15 PM 

Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
FL2
Room:
1022

Posted by Bobbie Weaver (weaver@ucar.edu) at x8946
Will this event be webcast?
Thursday, June 22, 2017 - 3:00pm

South American Monsoon System:  from the Last Glacial to the Last Millennium
Pedro L. Silva Dias
University of São Paulo

Abstract:
The natural climate variability is an important factor to be understood for exploring the predictive potential of the climate and to evaluate the role of the anthropogenic forcing. Paleoclimate records provide indications of the past variability and cover a much longer period than the instrumental era. The main purpose of this study is to evaluate the changes of the South American Monsoon System (SAMS) since the Last Glacial Period in numerical simulations of TRACE21k and PMIP3 and to validate the results based on paleoclimate indicators.  Large-scale aspects associated with the SAMS are explored, as well as its relations with the indicator of the low-frequency climate variability. The analyses have been based on the Large-scale Index for South American Monsoon (LISAM) applied in the weighted average set of the climate model simulations CCSM4-M, GISS-E2-R, IPSL-CM5A-LR, MIROC-ESM, MPI-ESM-P and MRI-ESM and TRACE21k. The LISAM is based on the analysis of combined Empirical Orthogonal Functions (EOFc) between the variables at 850 hPa: precipitation, temperature, humidity and wind. The first (second) mode of the EOFc represents the spatial patterns of the SAMS (South Atlantic Convergence Zone – SACZ). Regarding with the LISAM the patterns related of the first two modes (SAMS and SACZ, respectively) were similar to those found in the historical period. The temporal variability of the expansion coefficient series of the LISAM modes showed periods of variation associated with the variability of solar cycles and sunspots, as well as the systems internal oscillations. The internal variability of the SAMS and SACZ showed strong influences of the North and South Tropical Atlantic Ocean and the Pacific Ocean. Moreover, the time series of the first mode of EOFc proved to be a good indicator of climatic transition.

Thursday, June 22, 2017
3:00 pm – 4:00 pm
Mesa Lab, 1850 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, CO
ML-132-Main Seminar Room

For more information, please contact Teresa Foster, teresaf@ucar.edu, 303-497-1741    

Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
Mesa Lab
Room:
ML-132 Main Seminar Room

Posted by Teresa Foster (teresaf@ucar.edu) at x1741
Hosting lab/division or program:
CGD
Will this event be webcast?
No
Friday, June 30, 2017 - 10:00am

Data Stewardship and Engineering Team (DSET) - Building Community Informed and Driven Data Services

Sophie Hou
NCAR/CISL

 Being able to enable and facilitate scientific progress by providing advanced computing capabilities has been a focus for NCAR, especially through CISL. Additional developments of dedicated technical infrastructures for supporting data-related activities, such as visualization, analysis, processing, and transformation, have also been prioritized. However, in order to meet the diverse existing and emerging data needs from the scientific community, data services must integrate human and organizational services with technical developments. Data services have a better chance to be accepted and used by the target community if the community members are represented and consulted during the design and implementation process. The NCAR’s Data Stewardship Engineering Team (DSET) was created to design and implement comprehensive NCAR digital asset search, discovery, and access. To achieve this challenging task, cross-organizational participation and communication are essential, including having representatives and stakeholders from the NCAR science and technical divisions to leverage the expertise of both groups. The goal of DSET is to ensure that feedback from users is built into the process, and ultimately, enable data services, including the technical infrastructures, to be developed in alignment with the community’s research and data needs.

Bio: Sophie Hou (hou@ucar.edu) is the Data Curation & Stewardship Coordinator at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR)/University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR). At NCAR/UCAR, Sophie focuses on providing dedicated support, engagement, and training for questions and issues that scientific researchers might encounter when working with data (including software tools and model codes). Additionally, Sophie collaborates with and participates in both internal and external data curation-centric communities and activities, including NCAR Data Stewardship Engineering Team, to help share experiences and key lessons learned, especially those relating to data management infrastructures and best practices. Sophie has a Master of Science in Library and Information Science program with the specialization in Data Curation from the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, and prior to joining NCAR, Sophie's previous Bachelor and Master of Science degrees and professional work experience were in the field of Electrical Engineering.

 

Friday, June 30, 2017
10:00 a.m.-11:00 a.m.
Mesa Lab, Main Seminar Room

 
Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
Mesa Lab
Room:
Main Seminar Room

Posted by Kathy Peczkowicz (kathyp@ucar.edu) at x2431
Hosting lab/division or program:
CISL
Will this event be webcast?
Yes - ML-Main Seminar Room - http://ucarconnect.ucar.edu/live
Thursday, June 22, 2017 - 2:00pm

There exists still a great uncertainty in understanding the magnitude and even the sign of the cirrus short wave radiative effect. Partly, this is due to the difficulties of modelling and parametrizing the radiative properties of usually non-spherical ice crystals that tend to be found in various shapes and sizes in the atmosphere. Furthermore, recent modelling and laboratory studies have given evidence that including microscale complexities, such as surface roughness, will further change the ice crystal light scattering properties. Although, satellite retrieval algorithms already take into account ice crystal complexity, direct in-situ measurements of the microscale structures of natural ice crystals and its influence to their light scattering properties are largely missing.

In this talk I will present laboratory and field measurements of ice crystal complexity based on analysis of single particle light scattering patterns. It was found in four airborne measurement campaigns, representing ice clouds from the tropics to arctic, that natural ice crystals are rarely pristine and that their high degree of crystal complexity leads to a similar low asymmetry parameter that appears to be unchanged independent of the measurement location. In the second half of the talk I will discuss the implications of the measured asymmetry parameter for global climate modelling and, at the end of my talk, I will touch the topic of what new possibilities the knowledge of the angular light scattering behaviour of natural ice crystals could have for improved measurements of ice concentrations in mixed-phase clouds.

Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
FL2
Room:
1022 - Large Auditorium

Posted by Erin Fundalinski (erinf@ucar.edu) at x8713
Hosting lab/division or program:
EOL
Will this event be webcast?
Wednesday, June 28, 2017 - 3:00pm

The Dynamics and Magnetism of Solar Flares

Solar flares are the most energetic events on the Sun. Yet the relatively basic question “how is flare energy dissipated?” is still open. It is suspected that a large fraction of the energy of the accelerated particles is converted into continuum and line emission, heating, kinetic energy (mass motion), and changes of the magnetic field structure. By taking the “best-observed” X1 flare on 2014-03-29 as an example, I will explore what multi-wavelength observations tell us about the evolution of the solar atmosphere during a flare. Observations of the continuum at different wavelengths let us determine the flare temperature and that most of the input energy is radiated away as continuum emission. Spectroscopy and radiative transfer modeling show us mass motions, which still appear to be spatially unresolved. Chromospheric spectropolarimetry lets us determine chromospheric magnetic field changes for the first time, which intriguingly significantly differ from photospheric field changes, indicating a more complex flare picture than usually shown in the “standard model” cartoons.

 
Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
CG1
Room:
2126

Posted by Sheryl Shapiro (sheryls@ucar.edu) at x1567
Hosting lab/division or program:
HAO
Will this event be webcast?
Wednesday, June 28, 2017 - 12:00pm

Combining Proxy Data and Climate Simulations for Paleoclimate Reconstructions
Nils Weitzel
Meteorological Institute of the University of Bonn

Spatio-temporal reconstructions of past climate are important for the understanding of the long term behavior of the climate system and the sensitivity to forcing changes. Unfortunately, they are subject to large uncertainties, have to deal with a complex proxy-climate structure, and a physically reasonable interpolation between the sparse proxy observations is difficult. As Bayesian models can include multiple sources of information (e.g. different proxy types, physical models for interpolation, output from climate simulations) and quantify uncertainties in a statistically rigorous way, they are in theory a good method to approach these problems.

We present a Bayesian framework that combines a network of pollen records with a spatial prior distribution estimated from an ensemble of climate simulations. The use of climate simulation output aims at a physically reasonable spatial interpolation on a regional scale. To transfer the pollen data into (local) climate information, we use a forward version of the probabilistic indicator taxa model. In addition, we can include Gaussian distributed data from preprocessed proxy records. The Bayesian inference is performed using MCMC methods following a Metropolis-within-Gibbs strategy.

As applications of our framework, we show reconstructions of European temperature for the Mid Holocene (~6,000 years BP) and the Last Glacial Maximum (~21,000 years BP) using an ensemble of climate simulations from the PMIP3 project and pollen syntheses from Bartlein et al. (2011) and Simonis et al. (2012).

Future extensions of our method are the inclusion of other proxy types, the extension to spatio-temporal reconstructions of the last deglaciation, and the incorporation of additional types of uncertainty.

Wednesday, June 28th, 2017
12:00pm – 1:00pm
Mesa Lab, Chapman Room
(Bring your lunch)

 
Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
Mesa Lab
Room:
Chapman Room

Posted by Michelle Patton (mpatton@ucar.edu) at x1253
Hosting lab/division or program:
IMAGe
Will this event be webcast?
No
Thursday, July 6, 2017 - 12:00pm

Comparison of methods for updating intensity-duration-frequency curves using regional climate data at multiple spatial and temporal resolutions

Lauren Cook
Carnegie Mellon University

Intensity-duration-frequency (IDF) curves are a common input to engineering design, and are used to represent extreme rainfall in region. As rainfall patterns shift into a non-stationary regime as a result of climate change, these curves will need to be updated with future projections of extreme precipitation. Many regions have begun to update these curves to reflect the trends from downscaled climate models; however, few studies have compared the methods for doing so, as well as the uncertainty that results from the selection of the climate model, and its native grid scale and temporal resolution. This study will examine the variability in updated IDF curves for three locations (Pittsburgh, Seattle, and Phoenix) when the method for creation of future IDF curves is altered, as well as the underlying resolution (spatial, temporal) of the climate ensemble. Additional analysis will compare results using two emissions scenarios (RCP 4.5 and 8.5), climate model data sources (e.g., NA-CORDEX and NARCCAP), and downscaling techniques (dynamical v. statistical). Metrics for comparison include the resulting intensity of precipitation, as well as the effort expended to create the IDF curve. Finally, the resulting intensities will be used to design a stormwater retention basin using the TR-55 method (24-hour duration) and 50-year return period, in order to determine how the basin size is altered as the methods, models, and native resolutions change. 

Thursday, July 6th, 2017
12:00pm – 1:00pm
Mesa Lab, Chapman Room
(Bring your lunch)

 
Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
Mesa Lab
Room:
Chapman room

Posted by Michelle Patton (mpatton@ucar.edu) at x1253
Hosting lab/division or program:
IMAGe
Will this event be webcast?
No
Friday, July 14, 2017 - 12:00pm

Uncertainty Quantification for PDEs with Applications in Geo-spatial Data Analysis
Michelle Carey
University College Dublin

Spatial temporal data are abundant in many scientific fields, some examples include; satellite images of the earth, temperature readings from multiple weather stations and the spread of an infectious disease over a particular region taken over time. In many instances the spatial data are accompanied by mathematical models expressed in terms of partial differential equations (PDEs). These PDEs determine the theoretical aspects of the behaviour of the physical, chemical or biological phenomena considered. The parameters of the PDEs are typically unknown and must be inferred from expert knowledge of the phenomena considered. In this talk, I introduce a methodology for data driven estimates of the parameters of PDEs defined over complex domains. I will discuss extending the profiling with parameter cascading procedure outlined in Ramsay et al (2007) to incorporate PDE parameter estimation. Furthermore, following from Lai and Schumaker (2007) the estimation procedure is extended to include splines on triangulations. This allows the proposed method to account for attributes of the geometry of the physical problem such as irregular shaped domains, external and internal boundary features and strong concavities.

Friday, July 14th, 2017
12:00pm – 1:00pm
Mesa Lab, Damon Room
(Bring your lunch)

 
Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
Mesa Lab
Room:
Damon Room

Posted by Michelle Patton (mpatton@ucar.edu) at x1253
Hosting lab/division or program:
IMAGe
Friday, June 23, 2017 - 6:00pm

Parents’ Night Out is a great opportunity for you and your significant other to go out to dinner and a movie!

Contact Stephanie Ivancic, Director of UCAR’s Child Care Center, to sign your child up from 6 pm - 8 pm ($30 for one child or $40 for two children) or 6 pm - 10 pm ($50 for one child and $60 for two children).

Children are welcome to wear their pajamas for a fun evening of movies and pizza! If your child has a video that he or she would like to share, bring it along! Please make sure it is labeled and let the fun begin! Siblings under the age of 7 are welcome, too.

We invite all UCAR employees to take advantage of this fun evening as your child does not need to be enrolled at the UCAR Child Care Center to partake! 

Mark your calendars for future dates:   Friday, April 14 and 28, May 12 and 26, June 9 and 23, July 7 and 21.

Please contact Stephanie Ivancic for enrollment as well as drop-in care rates.  Stephanie’s email address is sivancic@cclc.comand her phone number is 303-443-5595.


Posted by Laurie Carr (lcarr@ucar.edu) at x8702
Hosting lab/division or program:
Human Resources
Friday, July 7, 2017 - 6:00pm

Parents’ Night Out is a great opportunity for you and your significant other to go out to dinner and a movie!

Contact Stephanie Ivancic, Director of UCAR’s Child Care Center, to sign your child up from 6 pm - 8 pm ($30 for one child or $40 for two children) or 6 pm - 10 pm ($50 for one child and $60 for two children).

Children are welcome to wear their pajamas for a fun evening of movies and pizza! If your child has a video that he or she would like to share, bring it along! Please make sure it is labeled and let the fun begin! Siblings under the age of 7 are welcome, too.

We invite all UCAR employees to take advantage of this fun evening as your child does not need to be enrolled at the UCAR Child Care Center to partake! 

Mark your calendars for future dates:   Friday, April 14 and 28, May 12 and 26, June 9 and 23, July 7 and 21.

Please contact Stephanie Ivancic for enrollment as well as drop-in care rates.  Stephanie’s email address is sivancic@cclc.comand her phone number is 303-443-5595.


Posted by Laurie Carr (lcarr@ucar.edu) at x8702
Hosting lab/division or program:
Human Resources
Friday, July 21, 2017 - 6:00pm

Parents’ Night Out is a great opportunity for you and your significant other to go out to dinner and a movie!

Contact Stephanie Ivancic, Director of UCAR’s Child Care Center, to sign your child up from 6 pm - 8 pm ($30 for one child or $40 for two children) or 6 pm - 10 pm ($50 for one child and $60 for two children).

Children are welcome to wear their pajamas for a fun evening of movies and pizza! If your child has a video that he or she would like to share, bring it along! Please make sure it is labeled and let the fun begin! Siblings under the age of 7 are welcome, too.

We invite all UCAR employees to take advantage of this fun evening as your child does not need to be enrolled at the UCAR Child Care Center to partake! 

Mark your calendars for future dates:   Friday, April 14 and 28, May 12 and 26, June 9 and 23, July 7 and 21.

Please contact Stephanie Ivancic for enrollment as well as drop-in care rates.  Stephanie’s email address is sivancic@cclc.comand her phone number is 303-443-5595.


Posted by Laurie Carr (lcarr@ucar.edu) at x8702
Hosting lab/division or program:
Human Resources
Friday, June 23, 2017 - 11:00am

Fuqing Zhang
Penn State
Department of Meteorology and Atmospheric Sciences
University Park, Pennsylvania

The focus of the talk will be on the potential of assimilating all-sky satellite radiances from both IR and MW sensors for severe weather and tropical cyclones. I will first present the impacts of assimilating GOES-R all-sky infrared brightness temperatures on tropical cyclone analysis and prediction were demonstrated through a series of convection-permitting OSSE and real-data experiments using an WRF-based ensemble Kalman filter. Assimilation of the simulated high temporal and spatial resolution infrared radiance observations not only constrained well the thermodynamic variables, including temperature, moisture and hydrometeors, but also considerably reduced analysis and forecast errors in the wind fields. The potential of all-sky radiances is further demonstrated through an additional proof-of-concept experiment assimilating real-data infrared brightness temperatures from GOES-13 and Himawara-8. We developed an empirical flow-dependent adaptive observation error inflation (AOEI) method to limit erroneous analysis increments where there are large representativeness errors, as is often the case for cloudy-affected radiance observations. Meanwhile, to better assimilate all-sky microwave radiance from polar-orbiting satellites, we begin to modify the Community Radiative Transfer Model (CRTM) to ensure that the cloud and precipitation particle scattering properties for calculating microwave radiances are consistent with the particle properties and size distributions internal to microphysics parameterization schemes. Using microphysics-consistent cloud scattering properties generates much greater variety in the simulated brightness temperature fields across the different microphysics schemes than the traditional use of effective radius.  The use of microphysics-consistent cloud scattering properties in the CRTM will help developing a more self-consistent tool for analyzing and constraining microphysics schemes, and to improve all-sky microwave radiance assimilation for convection-permitting analysis and prediction. Preliminary MW radiance assimilation experiments will also be presented. Also discussed will be the challenges and promises in assimilation of synthetic GOES-R observations for severe continental convective storms, in particular with regards to covariance localization across scales, and across variables.

Note Special Date and Time
Friday, 23 June 2017, 11:00 AM
Refreshments:  10:45 AM
NCAR-Foothills Laboratory
3450 Mitchell Lane
Bldg. 2, Main Auditorium, Room 1022

Building:
FL2
Room:
1022

Posted by Bobbie Weaver (weaver@ucar.edu) at x8946
Will this event be webcast?
Thursday, June 22, 2017 - 2:30pm

RAL/HAP Seminar - Combining a large sample of catchments and a flexible hydrological modeling framework: benefits and challenge  Note - now at 2:30 pm
Nans Addor,  Post-doctoral scientist in RAL/HAP
22 June 2017, 2:30 pm, FL2-1001

Abstract:

In hydrological studies, the formulation of generally valid conclusions is often impeded by the small number of catchments and hydrological models involved. Many studies at the catchment scale rely on a handful of catchments, so it is usually unclear to which extent their conclusions apply to catchments in other locations. Similarly, when modeling is involved, the number of models is typically low, so one may wonder whether the modeling results are generally valid, or if they are conditional on the modeling setup. To progress on these two fronts, I am co-developing and using a large sample of catchments (CAMELS) and a flexible hydrological modeling framework (FUSE). CAMELS is a new data set involving 671 catchments in the contiguous USA (CONUS). It consists of i) daily atmospheric forcing and discharge time series and ii) a wide range of catchment attributes describing the topography, vegetation, soil, geology and network characteristics of each catchment. I will show how CAMELS can be used to assess the information content of hydrological signatures (indices characterizing hydrologic behavior) and to explore how well those signatures can be predicted using catchment attributes. I will summarize these findings by introducing a ranking of hydrological signatures, useful for the evaluation, calibration and selection of hydrological models. FUSE is a flexible hydrological modeling framework enabling the construction of conceptual models piece by piece. I adapted the original FUSE model and produced a new version optimized for parallel computing and that can be run either at the catchment scale or on a grid. I used FUSE to explore whether a flexible modeling framework can replace a small ensemble of hydrological models typically used for impact modeling. I ran different FUSE instances over the CONUS using 10 CMIP5 climate projections over 1980-2100. FUSE simulations are realistic and compare well with simulations from the hydrological models VIC and PRMS. I will discuss the potential of flexible modeling frameworks to provide more reliable and more tractable estimates of the uncertainty in hydrological projections.

 

Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
FL2
Room:
1001

Posted by Andrew Newman (anewman@ucar.edu) at x8456
Hosting lab/division or program:
HAP
Will this event be webcast?
Thursday, June 22, 2017 - 8:00am
Date and Time: 
2017 June 22nd - whole day class
2017 June 23rd - whole hands on
Location: 
Mesa Lab Fleishmann building
 
Speaker: Neal McBurnett

Apache Spark is a modern open source cluster computing platform. It is helping data scientists analyze and explore large datasets more effectively than ever before, in terms of both software development productivity and efficient use of hardware, scaling from on-premises clusters to on-demand cloud computing.

Come see examples of Spark at work on scientific datasets, and learn how the largest open source project in data processing can help unify a variety of tasks, including machine learning, streaming data and SQL queries, using Python, Scala Java or R. 

We'll also touch on Tensorflow, the hot new deep learning and numerical computation library from Google.

Speaker Description: 
Neal McBurnett is a consultant in Boulder Colorado. Since his career as a Distinguished Member of Technical Staff at Bell Labs, working on tools for software development, security and open source web collaboration, he has taught Artificial Intelligence at CU and worked as a techincal content developer at Databricks for courses on Apache Spark, including two massive online courses on Spark in 2015.

Please email Cecilia Banner at banner@ucar.edu to register for this class, there is limited space.  There is no fee.

 
 
 
Type of event:
Tutorial/Training
Building:
Fleischman

Posted by Cecilia Banner (banner@ucar.edu) at x1231
Will this event be webcast?
No
Thursday, June 29, 2017 - 3:30pm

Robert Jeffrey Trapp
Department of Atmospheric Sciences
University of Illinois

Strong-to-violent tornadoes cause a disproportionate amount of damage, in part because the width and length of a tornado damage track are correlated to tornado intensity. Indeed, the tendency expressed in the observational record is that the most intense tornadoes are typically the widest. Here we explore the rather simple hypothesis that wide, intense tornadoes should form more readily out of wide, rotating updrafts. This hypothesis is supported by a quantification of Kelvin’s circulation theorem using Doppler radar observations. It is further supported by idealized numerical simulations of supercellular thunderstorms, wherein updraft width is controlled most significantly by environmental vertical wind shear; analyses of linear and nonlinear dynamic pressure forcing readily explain this control. In addition to a robust relation between updraft width and tornadic-vortex intensity, the simulations show internal consistency between the supercellular updraft, downdraft, cold pool, and cloud top characteristics. Some broader implications of this convective coupling will discussed, including a possible application of satellite remote sensing to anticipate high-impact convective weather.

Refreshments 3:15 PM
NCAR-Foothills Laboratory
3450 Mitchell Lane 

 

Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
FL2
Room:
1001 (Note Location)

Posted by Bobbie Weaver (weaver@ucar.edu) at x8946
Will this event be webcast?
Thursday, June 22, 2017 - 3:30pm

Peter Sullivan
NCAR/MMM

Recently, we performed very high resolution large eddy simulations (LESs) of canonical stable boundary layers (SBL) over a range of stratification using a mesh of 1024^3 gridpoints (mesh spacing 0.39 m). The stratification h/L varied from 1.7 to 6 where h is the SBL height and L is the Monin-Obukhov length.  For the highest stratification considered continuous turbulence is maintained, but the SBL appears to split vertically with different dynamics above and below the height of the low-level jet. One of the most intriguing features in these simulations is the presence of ubiquitous temperature fronts. Animations show that these sharp fronts are tilted in the downstream direction, exhibit spatial spanwise and vertical coherence and propagate in time as organized entities. The front tilt and vertical separation is determined by the balance between the background stratification and the amplitude of the turbulent fluctuations.  The fronts are internally generated by the dynamical interaction between turbulence and a stably stratified temperature field--the surface boundary conditions in the LES are horizontally homogeneous.  Based on conditional averaging, the flow fields near a temperature front appear to be controlled by pairs of upstream and downstream vortices. Guided by the LES findings, we are able to identify qualitatively similar patterns in temperature profiles collected during the CASES-99 field campaign.

Thursday, 22 June 2017, 3:30 PM
Refreshments:  3:15 PM
NCAR-Foothills Laboratory
3450 Mitchell Lane
Bldg. 2, Main Auditorium, Room 1022 

Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
FL2
Room:
1022

Posted by Bobbie Weaver (weaver@ucar.edu) at x8946
Will this event be webcast?
Tuesday, June 27, 2017 - 1:30pm

Weather risk transfer: A growing weather data-driven area of finance

Day-to-day variability of weather like temperature, precipitation, and wind—which is distinct from natural catastrophes like hurricanes and severe thunderstorms—can have significant financial impact on sectors like energy, agriculture, water, construction, and outdoor entertainment, amongst others. Businesses and governments that hold weather risk can choose to transfer it to a financial institution like an insurer. They shed weather risk by paying a premium to the financial institution, in exchange for financial protection when weather is bad for business operations. Weather risk transfer has grown into a multi-billion dollar market because of ample historical weather data; a large appetite of financial institutions for weather risk; and the intuitive relationship between weather and the financial performance of weather-exposed entities. However, market growth has been slower than expected. This is largely due to a lack of independent advisors who understand weather and have the analysis expertise to quantify the linkages between weather and a weather-exposed entity’s financial performance. Such an advisor would be well positioned to translate weather into the financial concern of interest, creating an environmental and economic opportunity for the advisor, weather-exposed entities, sellers of financial protection, and the broader weather risk transfer market.

At Nephila Advisors LLC, Matthew has the role of Portfolio Analyst and works within the Weather Risk investment strategy. Matthew's expertise includes designing customized risk transfer products; quantifying the frequency and severity of weather and water events; and ongoing portfolio management and business development. He joined the company in July 2011 and previously worked at Citadel LLC and the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), giving him a unique blend of experience in capital markets, insurance, and weather risk management. Matthew has an MBA in Finance from the University of Virginia’s Darden School of Business, an MS in Meteorology from the Pennsylvania State University, and a BS in Chemistry and Environmental Sciences from the University of Virginia. Matthew is an alumnus of NCAR’s SOARS internship program.

Tuesday, June 27, 2017 1:30PM-2:30PM FL2-1001

 
Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
FL2
Room:
1001

Posted by Jessa Johnson (jessaj@ucar.edu) at x2751
Hosting lab/division or program:
RAL
Will this event be webcast?
No