Staff Notes Daily Calendar Events

Friday, April 20, 2018 - 8:30am

ALL STAFF INVITED 2018 NCAR/UCP Day of Networking & Discovery

Date:  Friday, April 20th from 8:30 - 4:00 PM
Location:  CG Auditoriums
Lunch:  Noon - CG Lobby - In order to provide catering with an accurate number of lunch attendees, PLEASE take a moment to RSVP HERE
Reception: Immediately following sponsored by UCAR's President's Office
 
All stall are invited to participate in this special day of Science Discovery and Networking.  The day will offer an opportunity to interact with colleagues and be exposed to research, engineering and other technical advancements that are likely ou tside of your normal group of collaborators. This networking event can thus help identify synergies and opportunities for stronger collaborations across NCAR, and between NCAR and UCP.
 
To view previous Science Day agendas visit our webpage CLICK HERE. The 2018 Agenda will be available on the webpage soon.  
Type of event:
No event type category
Building:
CG1
Room:
Auditoriums

Posted by Kara Mayock (kmayock@ucar.edu) at x2188
Will this event be webcast?
No
Monday, April 30, 2018 - 3:30pm

ACOM Seminar

Title:  Deodorant, Cleaning Products and the Virtue of Smelling Bad: Investigations into Emerging Sources of Air Pollution from Consumer Chemical Products

Presenter:  Matthew M. Coggon, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado, Bouler

Abstract: Over the past 50 years, urban air pollution due to vehicle emissions has steadily decreased at a rate of 7.5%/year. In the meantime, other sources of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) have largely remained unchanged. Now that cars are cleaner, it has been estimated that other sources of reactive carbon, such as personal care products, cleaning products, and solvents from paints, may contribute up to half of the VOC burden in urban areas. The VOCs emitted from these sources are highest in indoor environments, but once exhausted to the outdoors, are likely to contribute to the formation of ozone and secondary organic aerosol. Here, we will present work aimed at evaluating VOCs emitted from consumer products. First, we present work from Los Angeles showing that volatile chemical products are a major source of VOCs in urban air. Second, we will explore potential tracers that could be used to detect the presence of VOCs emitted from consumer products, including decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5-siloxane). Finally, we will present recent measurements aimed at assessing emissions of terpenes from fragranced consumer products. We will explore whether an anthropogenic signal can be detected in the urban environment, and distinguishable from biogenic sources.

Monday, 30 April 2018, 3:30 PM
Refreshments 3:15 PM
NCAR-Foothills Laboratory • 3450 Mitchell Lane
Bldg 2 Large Auditorium (Rm1022)
Webcast: https://ucarconnect.ucar.edu/live (Room 2: FL2-1022)

Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
Foothills Labs
Room:
1022

Posted by Bonnie Slagel (bonnie@ucar.edu) at x8318
Hosting lab/division or program:
ACOM
Will this event be webcast?
Tuesday, April 24, 2018 - 11:00am

Title: ENSO teleconnections and climate impacts over North America: How well do we know them and how do we evaluate models accordingly?

Speaker: Clara Deser, NCAR

Tuesday, April 24, 2018 - 11:00 a.m.
Mesa Lab, Main Seminar Room

Abstract:
The canonical impacts of ENSO are generally assessed by compositing over a large number of events, thereby reducing the noise from internal variability unrelated to ENSO. In this talk, I shall discuss to what extent the 100-year observational record is adequate for revealing the true forced response to ENSO, with a focus on wintertime teleconnections and climate impacts over North America. I shall also discuss how to evaluate climate model simulations in the face of observational uncertainty in both the spatial pattern and amplitude of ENSO’s impacts. Such observational uncertainty necessitates an approach to model assessment that considers not only the model’s forced response to ENSO, but also its representation of internal variability unrelated to ENSO. I shall show results from so-called “Tropical Pacific Pacemaker” simulations with CESM1 and CM2.1 in which sea surface temperature anomalies in the eastern tropical Pacific are nudged to observations. The fully-coupled Pacemaker simulations will also be compared with CAM5 AMIP experiments. Finally, the role of ENSO diversity and non-linearity will also be discussed.

Building:
Mesa Lab
Room:
Main Seminar Room

Posted by Barbara Middlebrook (bmiddleb@ucar.edu) at x1366
Will this event be webcast?
Yes - ML-Main Seminar Room - http://ucarconnect.ucar.edu/live
Tuesday, May 1, 2018 - 11:00am

Title: Belief in dissenter messages vs. anthropogenic climate change acceptance: A hard lesson in climate education

Speaker: Andrew Bentley, University of Northern Colorado

Tuesday, May 1, 2018 - 11:00 a.m.
Mesa Lab, Main Seminar Room

Abstract:
Organized climate change dissention dedicates a considerable amount of resources to spread misinformation regarding anthropogenic climate change (ACC). Anti-ACC messages work in opposition to the efforts of formal and informal climate educators. Misinformation produced by organized dissention covers a wide range of topics. My research focuses on the relationship between ACC dissenter message agreement, and the rejection ACC. In this talk I will discuss the results of my most recent distribution of the Anthropogenic Climate Change Dissenter Inventory. This inventory contains several authentic dissenter messages collected in a previous study. The dissenter messages in this instrument cover a wide range of topics which I factor into six themes (e.g., ACC is beneficial, mankind’s actions have no impact on climate, etc.). Respondents who agreed with the ‘recent warming is only part of a larger cycle’ messages were the most likely to reject ACC when compared to agreement with other dissenter message themes. Other stronger correlations included participants’ preferred news network and political ideology. Interestingly, belief in claims that scientists unethically conduct research or that a warming climate would be beneficial were not significantly correlated with dissent. A portion of this talk will examine the claim that ACC knowledge is not a strong predictor of dissent. Researchers making this claim often use self-assessed knowledge (e.g., “how much do you know about ACC”) in lieu of an ACC assessment when making claims. The prevalence of misinformation may be driving these researchers’ results—that belief or concern is lower for those with a higher understanding of the science of ACC. With that said, our results agree with these researchers’ assertion that knowledge is not the strongest predictor of dissent. Thus, teaching “just the science” when conveying climate change may be misguided. Recommendations for effective K-16 will be discussed. 

Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium

Posted by Barbara Middlebrook (bmiddleb@ucar.edu) at x1366
Will this event be webcast?
Yes - ML-Main Seminar Room - http://ucarconnect.ucar.edu/live
Tuesday, May 29, 2018 - 11:00am

Title: Circumglobal Teleconnections and Linkages with Heat Waves in the Northern Hemisphere Summer

Speaker: Haiyan Teng, NCAR

Tuesday, May 29, 2018 - 11:00 a.m.
Mesa Lab, Main Seminar Room

Abstract:
In contrast to some well-known teleconnection patterns that have strong variations in the meridional direction, such as the NAO and PNA, there is a class of intrinsic planetary wave patterns of subseasonal and longer co-variability that are primarily orientated in the zonal direction. These patterns are often referred to as circumglobal telenconnections (CGTs). They are associated with the waveguiding effect of the tropospheric mean jet on Rossby waves. In recent years, many studies have reported close linkages between midlatitude extremes (heat waves, floods) and CGTs in the northern summer, although the mechanisms for the CGTs should be less effective in the summer. In this talk, I shall review our recent work on the seasonality of the tropospheric waveguide teleconnections and their connections with the US heat waves. I shall use a series of CESM1 prescribed soil moisture experiments as an example, to discuss how land surface forcing, together with synoptic eddies, can force a circumglobal response despite the much weaker mean jets and waveguide effects in the northern summer. 

Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
Mesa Lab
Room:
Main Seminar Room

Posted by Barbara Middlebrook (bmiddleb@ucar.edu) at x1366
Will this event be webcast?
Yes - ML-Main Seminar Room - http://ucarconnect.ucar.edu/live
Tuesday, May 8, 2018 - 11:00am

Title: Importance of the ocean general circulation to Southern Ocean mixed layer formation

Speaker: Justin Small, NCAR

Tuesday, May 8, 2018 - 11:00 a.m.
Mesa Lab, Main Seminar Room

Abstract:
Deep mixed layers (O(100m)) form in relatively few locations of the world ocean during hemispheric winter, including isolated regions of the Labrador Sea and Greenland-Iceland-Norwegian Seas. In the southern hemisphere they cover a large zonal extent of the Southern Ocean, but are confined in the meridional direction. Most climate models, including the Community Earth System Model (CESM), have problems simulating sufficiently deep mixed layers in the Southern Ocean. The same models often have other deficiencies in this region, such as too-strong leakage of Agulhas waters into the Atlantic. This is associated with sea surface temperature (SST) and salinity biases in the Indian and Pacific Oceans, close to the Agulhas Return Current and Antarctic Circumpolar Current. In this talk I will describe the link between ocean circulation errors and the shallow mixed layer bias. This is done by exploring the sensitivity to ocean model resolution, and to nudging the ocean currents towards observed values. Two key processes lead to improved mixed layer depths when the ocean general circulation is more realistic: i) the response of the net surface heat flux to changes in SST and ii) the poleward transport of subtropical water with high salinity. Finally I will discuss whether these results have relevance to other regions such as North Atlantic mode water region and Labrador Sea convection.

Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
Mesa Lab
Room:
Main Seminar Room

Posted by Barbara Middlebrook (bmiddleb@ucar.edu) at x1366
Will this event be webcast?
Yes - ML-Main Seminar Room - http://ucarconnect.ucar.edu/live
Monday, April 23, 2018 - 3:30pm

Title: Ocean Heat Uptake and Dynamic Sea Level Rise: Past and Future Uncertainty

Speaker: Laure Zanna, Univ. of Oxford, U.K.

Monday, April 23, 2018 - 3:30 pm
Mesa Lab, Main Seminar Room

Abstract:
The ocean absorbs a significant portion of the anthropogenic heat released in the climate system, leading to an increase in global mean sea level rise. Observed and projected regional patterns of heat uptake in mid- and high-latitudes are controlled in part by changes in ocean circulation. Using a new estimate of ocean heat content, direct measurements and models, I will present evidence that in the Atlantic: 1) half of the thermosteric sea level trend since 1970 is due to ocean circulation changes; 2) the uncertainty in dynamic sea level projections can be explained by the ocean circulation response to uncertain air-sea fluxes (rather than from ocean model uncertainty). I will use a simple conceptual model to explain the changes and discuss the implications for climate projections of dynamic sea level. 

Building:
Mesa Lab
Room:
Main Seminar Room

Posted by Barbara Middlebrook (bmiddleb@ucar.edu) at x1366
Will this event be webcast?
No
Monday, April 23, 2018 - 12:00pm

CGD/CCR Brown Bag Seminar

Title:  Radiative Forcing, Radiative Response, and the Hydrological Cycle
Speaker:  Ryan Kramer, University of Miami

Abstract:  Changes to the hydrological cycle will be among the most societally impactful consequences of climate change.  Global-mean precipitation, a proxy for hydrological cycle strength, is robustly projected to increase with global warming in climate models.  However, the magnitude of this change varies considerably across models. Globally, energy balances in the climate system constrain hydrological cycle changes. We apply this framework to determine sources of inter-model spread. Using the radiative kernel technique, we quantify instantaneous radiative forcing, rapid adjustments and surface-temperature-mediated radiative responses acting on the hydrological cycle in a suite of Global Climate Models (GCMs) participating in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5).      We find that instantaneous radiative forcing contributes substantially to inter-model spread in the net radiative flux response at the Earth’s surface, suggesting that uncertainty in hydrological cycle projections can be traced to differences in the implementation of radiative transfer theory between models.  We also explore why recent applications of the radiative kernel technique have provided conflicting results regarding the role of cloud versus non-cloud radiative constraints on the hydrological cycle.  We identify notable differences between GCM-based radiative kernels and discuss what this implies for how we evaluate radiative responses in models and observations.  Finally, in relation to this work, we introduce the first set of radiative kernels based on satellite observations, which we use to estimate radiative feedbacks in the A-train satellite observational record.


Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
Mesa Lab
Room:
Damon Room

Posted by Stephanie Shearer (shearer@ucar.edu) at x1624
Hosting lab/division or program:
CGD
Will this event be webcast?
No
Wednesday, May 2, 2018 - 10:00am

Theory-guided Data Science: A New Paradigm for Scientific Discovery Combining Physics with Machine Learning
Anuj Karpatne
University of Minnesota Twin Cities 

This talk will introduce theory-guided data science, a novel paradigm of scientific discovery that leverages the unique ability of data science methods to automatically extract patterns and models from data, but without ignoring the treasure of knowledge accumulated in scientific theories. Theory-guided data science aims to fully capitalize the power of machine learning and data mining methods in scientific disciplines by deeply coupling them with models based on scientific theories. This talk will describe several ways in which scientific knowledge can be combined with data science methods in various scientific disciplines such as hydrology, climate science, aerospace, and chemistry. To demonstrate the value in combining physics with data science, the talk will also introduce a novel framework for combining deep learning methods with physics-based models, termed as physics-guided neural networks, and present some preliminary results of this framework for an application in lake temperature modeling. The talk will conclude with a discussion of future prospects in exploiting latest advances in deep learning for building the next generation of scientific models for dynamical systems, where theory-based and data science methods are used at an equal footing.

Biography
Anuj Karpatne is currently a Postdoctoral Associate at the University of Minnesota, where he develops data mining methods for solving scientific and socially relevant problems in Prof. Vipin Kumar's research group. He has published more than 25 peer-reviewed articles at top-tier conferences and journals in computer science (e.g., KDD, ICDM, SDM, TKDE, and ACM Computing Surveys), given multiple invited talks, and served on panels at leading venues (e.g., SDM and SSDBM). His research has resulted in a system to monitor the dynamics of surface water bodies on a global scale, which was featured in an NSF news story. He is also a co-author of the second edition of the textbook, "Introduction to Data Mining." Anuj received his Ph.D. in September 2017 from the University of Minnesota under the guidance of Prof. Kumar. Before joining the University of Minnesota, Anuj received his bachelor's and master's degrees from the Indian Institute of Technology Delhi. Anuj will be joining Virginia Tech as an assistant professor in computer science starting Fall 2018.

Refreshments will be served at 9:45am outside of the MSR!
Wednesday, May 2nd, 2018
10:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.
Mesa Lab, Main Seminar Room

Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
Mesa Lab
Room:
MSR

Posted by Kathy Peczkowicz (kathyp@ucar.edu) at x2431
Hosting lab/division or program:
CISL
Will this event be webcast?
No
Tuesday, April 24, 2018 - 2:30pm

Planar Nanotube-Based Radiometers for Space and Telecommunications
John H. Lehman
NIST, Sources and Detectors Group

The primary standards for optical power measurements at NIST and other National Metrology Institutes in the world are based on thermal detectors and the principle of electrical substitution. Traceability is realized through electrical measurements and the SI by way of the volt and ohm. We have recently demonstrated that we can achieve small, fast, accurate and extremely efficient and broadband radiometers based on micromachined silicon and vertically aligned carbon nanotubes. These chipscale radiometers embody all the essential elements of an absolute radiometer on a single chip. The application for these radiometers ranges from optical fiber power meter calibrations, laser-power measurements, and space-based solar irradiance and solar spectral irradiance.

 Tuesday, 24 April 2018, 2:30 PM
Refreshments 2:15 PM
NCAR-Foothills Laboratory • 3450 Mitchell Lane
Bldg 2 Large Auditorium (Rm1022)

 Webcast: https://ucarconnect.ucar.edu/live (Room 2: FL2-1022)

Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
FL2
Room:
1022

Posted by Erin Fundalinski (erinf@ucar.edu) at x8713
Hosting lab/division or program:
EOL
Will this event be webcast?
Thursday, May 31, 2018 - 11:00am

On forecasting solar eruptive events - Leap forward in predicting Space Weather

With the purpose to introduce one of the most accurate and reliable Space Weather forecasting tool, we present new insights into the pre-flare and Coronal Mass Ejection behavior and the evolution of the Active Regions (ARs) by analysing the SOHO/MDI-Debrecen Data (SDD) and the SDO/HMI - Debrecen Data (HMIDD) sunspot catalogues. After a brierf general introduction to the toppic for setting the scene, we embark on our method developed recently that employs the so-called weighted horizontal gradient of magnetic field (WG_M). WG_M is defined between opposite polarity spot-groups that are present in the vicinity of the polarity inversion line(s) of ARs. This parameter provides important diagnostic information (i) about the accurate prediction of flare onset time, (ii) on the flare intensity and (iii) towards CME risk assessment from C- to the X-class flares. We will also discuss additional two auxiliary parameters that guide us about which AR should be given attention for pre-flare and CME monitoring and further analysis. Finally, we discuss how local (sub)surface dynamics may be linked to the global evolution of the solar cycle and how this link may be exploited for impriving space weather forecasting.

 
Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
CG1
Room:
2139

Posted by Sheryl Shapiro (sheryls@ucar.edu) at x1567
Hosting lab/division or program:
HAO
Will this event be webcast?
No
Wednesday, May 2, 2018 - 2:00pm

Experimental testing of scattering polarization models

We realized a laboratory experiment to study the polarization of the Na I doublet at 589.3 nm, in the presence of a magnetic field. The purpose of the experiment is to test the theory of scattering polarization for illumination conditions typical of astrophysical plasmas. This work was stimulated by solar observations of the Na I doublet that have proven particularly challenging to reproduce with current models of polarized line formation, even casting doubts on our very understanding of the physics of scattering polarization on the Sun. The experiment has confirmed the fundamental correctness of the current theory, and demonstrated that the "enigmatic'' polarization of those observations is exclusively of solar origin.

 

Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
CG1
Room:
2126

Posted by Sheryl Shapiro (sheryls@ucar.edu) at x1567
Hosting lab/division or program:
HAO
Will this event be webcast?
Monday, July 9, 2018 - 9:00am

NCL + VAPOR Workshop

July 9-12, 2018
Corporate Technical Training Center
Center Green campus, 3085 Center Green Drive (CG-2)
Boulder, CO

This 4-day workshop is geared towards new users of NCL and VAPOR. It will include a combination of introductory lectures on NCL and scientific data formats and graphics, and 3D visualization using VAPOR. Students will be encouraged to bring their own data to the workshop. There will be hands-on labs every afternoon, where the instructors will work individually with students to help them analyze their own data using NCL and VAPOR.

Registration is limited and the summer workshop tends to fill up quickly, so register as soon as possible. The deadline is June 15, 2018.

Travel support is available on a first-come, first-served basis for qualified students from EPSCoR states or minority-serving institutions to attend. The deadline for applying for funds is May 14, 2018.

See the link below for full details and a link to the registration form.

http://www.ncl.ucar.edu/Training/Workshops/

Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
CG2
Room:
Corporate Technical Training Center

Posted by Elizabeth Faircloth (fair@ucar.edu) at x1253
Will this event be webcast?
No
Tuesday, June 5, 2018 - 8:00am
NCAR is pleased to partner with CUAHSI to offer an extended (3.5day) training workshop on the Community WRF-Hydro Modeling System the week of June 5-8 2018. Applications are now being accepted and interested applicants can apply through the event Website until 5:00 p.m. ET on February 28, 2018. We recommend that you submit your application as soon as possible, as applications will be reviewed on a rolling basis first-come, first-served. Below is a summary of the workshop. 
 

Course Description

This training workshop will provide graduate students and early career scientists with formal instruction on the structure and application of the WRF-Hydro system and will offer hands-on experience in setting up and running the system for several different research and prediction applications.

Specific topics to be covered during the workshop include:

  • Conceptualization and structure of the WRF-Hydro system
  • Description of physics components options within WRF-Hydro v5.0
  • Model porting and compilation and overview of parallel computing with WRF-Hydro
  • Model input data preparation
  • Model configuration and execution
  • Visualization and post-processing of model output
  • Test cases and experimental runs
  • Setup and use of the open source Rwrfhydro hydrologic model evaluation package
  • Model calibration
  • Open discussion on class participant interests and applications

Class participants will receive in-depth training via lectures and hands-on activities on the implementation and use of the WRF-Hydro system where all hands-on tutorial activities will be conducted in a formal computer laboratory located at NCAR in Boulder, CO.

Type of event:
Tutorial/Training
Building:
FL2
Room:
1024

Posted by Molly McAllister (mollymca@ucar.edu) at x8253
Hosting lab/division or program:
HAP
Will this event be webcast?
No
Wednesday, April 25, 2018 - 11:30am

Enhancing eddy-mean flow interaction in ocean models
Laure Zanna
University of Oxford

Abstract:
The role of turbulent mesoscale (10-100km) eddies is crucial for the ocean circulation and its energy cycle. The sub-grid scale eddy variability needs to be parametrized in ocean models, even at so-called eddy permitting resolutions. I will present some recent advances we have made in representing turbulent eddy fluxes using a non-Newtonian viscous stress.  The non-Newtonian stress depends on the partially resolved scales and their variability and is shown to be a good parametrization of ocean turbulence by enhancing the kinetic energy inverse cascade. The parametrization possesses attractive features for implementation in global models:  little computational cost, flow- and scale-awareness, and a dependence on the life cycle of mesoscale turbulence. 

Wednesday, 25 April 2018
11:30 am – 12:30 pm
Mesa Lab, 1850 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, CO
ML-245 – Chapman Room
Seminar will not be webcast
For more information, please contact Teresa Foster, teresaf@ucar.edu, 303-497-1741

Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
Mesa Lab
Room:
ML-245 Chapman Room

Posted by Teresa Foster (teresaf@ucar.edu) at x1741
Hosting lab/division or program:
CGD
Will this event be webcast?
No
Thursday, April 26, 2018 - 3:30pm

Speaker: Annareli Morales
University of Michigan  

Atmospheric rivers (ARs) are responsible for 30-50% of the annual precipitation for the U.S. West Coast, mainly through mountain snowfall. When the moist nearly neutral flow associated with these ARs interacts with topography, complex interactions occur between the dynamics, thermodynamics, and cloud microphysics that make it difficult to disentangle the dominant controls on precipitation type, amount, and its location over a mountain. This seminar presents recent work exploring the sensitivity of clouds and precipitation to microphysical parameter perturbations using an idealized modeling framework. Results for the most influential microphysical parameters found in this case (i.e., snow fallspeed coefficient, snow particle density, ice-cloud water collection efficiency, and rain accretion) will be presented. Additionally, experiments are performed to test how an environment with a weaker wind profile and an environment with a lower freezing level impact the microphysical parameter perturbation results. In general, perturbations to microphysical parameters affect the location of peak precipitation, while the total amount of precipitation is more sensitive to environmental parameter perturbations. A preview of current work using the Morris screening method, which is a robust statistical tool allowing for simultaneous perturbation of numerous parameters, will also be shown. Overall these results highlight the complexity of the orographic precipitation response to microphysical parameter changes and suggests that a small subset of the total number of parameters are responsible for most of the microphysics-induced variability in orographic precipitation.

Refreshments: 3:15 PM

Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
Foothills Labs
Room:
1022

Posted by Bobbie Weaver (weaver@ucar.edu) at x8946
Hosting lab/division or program:
MMM
Will this event be webcast?
Saturday, April 21, 2018 - 2:00pm

Over the last half-century, our ability to shrink transistors has led to the exponential growth in computing power, giving scientists a powerful new tool: the computer model. Computers act like mathematical “telescopes”, enabling scientists to peer into problems that can’t be solved by human brainpower alone. One such problem is the behavior of that crucial, thin layer of fluids that enshrouds planet Earth – our atmosphere and oceans. Computer modeling of the atmosphere yielded steady improving weather forecasts, which has saved innumerable lives and property. Modeling of the interplay of the components in the Earth’s climate system has led to an understanding of the risks of greenhouse gas emissions, knowledge critical to ensuring the sustainability of human civilization and perhaps even life on Earth.

But nature teaches us that all exponential growth can’t go on indefinitely. While the end of the growth of computing power is not at hand just yet, challenges have emerged that suggest the “free lunch” era is over. The road ahead will be fraught with emerging limits on Earth system models in terms of computational speed, energy consumption, software complexity, and data volumes. Ideas for meeting each of these challenges, so we can continue to make scientific progress, is the focus of this public lecture.

More details about this talk and other NCAR Explorer Series talks please click the link below:
https://ncar.ucar.edu/education-outreach/ncar-explorer-series

This is a public event and tickets are required. Order your ticket here:
https://www.eventbrite.com/e/what-are-the-limits-of-modeling-our-planet-tickets-41636716540?aff=es2

Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
Mesa Lab
Room:
Main Seminar Room

Posted by Scott Briggs (sbriggs@ucar.edu) at x1607
Hosting lab/division or program:
NCAR Education & Outreach
Will this event be webcast?
Yes - ML-Main Seminar Room - http://ucarconnect.ucar.edu/live
Wednesday, April 25, 2018 - 7:00pm

Over the last half-century, our ability to shrink transistors has led to the exponential growth in computing power, giving scientists a powerful new tool: the computer model. Computers act like mathematical “telescopes”, enabling scientists to peer into problems that can’t be solved by human brainpower alone. One such problem is the behavior of that crucial, thin layer of fluids that enshrouds planet Earth – our atmosphere and oceans. Computer modeling of the atmosphere yielded steady improving weather forecasts, which has saved innumerable lives and property. Modeling of the interplay of the components in the Earth’s climate system has led to an understanding of the risks of greenhouse gas emissions, knowledge critical to ensuring the sustainability of human civilization and perhaps even life on Earth.

But nature teaches us that all exponential growth can’t go on indefinitely. While the end of the growth of computing power is not at hand just yet, challenges have emerged that suggest the “free lunch” era is over. The road ahead will be fraught with emerging limits on Earth system models in terms of computational speed, energy consumption, software complexity, and data volumes. Ideas for meeting each of these challenges, so we can continue to make scientific progress, is the focus of this public lecture.

More details about this talk and other NCAR Explorer Series talks please click the link below:
https://ncar.ucar.edu/education-outreach/ncar-explorer-series

This is a public event and tickets are required. Order your ticket here:
https://www.eventbrite.com/e/what-are-the-limits-of-modeling-our-planet-tickets-41713640622?aff=es2

Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
Mesa Lab
Room:
Main Seminar Room

Posted by Scott Briggs (sbriggs@ucar.edu) at x1607
Hosting lab/division or program:
NCAR Education & Outreach
Will this event be webcast?
Yes - ML-Main Seminar Room - http://ucarconnect.ucar.edu/live