Staff Notes Daily Calendar Events

Monday, September 25, 2017 - 9:00am

The Bonfils Blood Center mobile bus will visit CG1 on Monday, September 25.  The bus will be located on the north side of CG1.  Appointments are available between 9:00 a.m. and 2:30 p.m.  The bus will be closed between 11:00 a.m. and noon.

If you would like to donate, please contact Laurie Carr, lcarr@ucar.edu, to make an appointment.  Please review the blood donation guidelines.    

Type of event:
No event type category
Building:
CG1
Room:
CG1 North parking lot

Posted by Laurie Carr (lcarr@ucar.edu) at x8702
Hosting lab/division or program:
Human Resources
Saturday, November 4, 2017 - 10:00am

Join the UCAR Center for Science Education (SciEd) for our Spectacular Super Science Saturday Event on Nov. 4th! This year's theme is "Wild Weather".

UCAR/NCAR/UCP staff help to make the event fun, meaningful, and informative by greeting the public, providing general information and engaging the public in simple science education activities. Please consider volunteering for one of the following shifts:
9:30 am – 1:00 pm
12:30 pm – 4:30 pm

Click on the link below to sign up to volunteer with us at this amazing event:

https://scied.ucar.edu/super-science-saturday/volunteer

Type of event:
Public Outreach
Building:
Mesa Lab

Posted by NATALIE PONSFORD (nataliep@ucar.edu) at x2585
Hosting lab/division or program:
UCAR Center for Science Education
Will this event be webcast?
No
Thursday, October 12, 2017 - 9:00am

Federally Funded Research and Development Centers (FFRDC) and universities are increasingly impacted by the rapidly evolving world of IT security, privacy and regulatory compliance. The Cybersecurity Partnership seeks to inform, clarify and initiate hands-on cooperation among the research community.

This event is highly recommended for security system administrators, principal investigators, proposal and budget administrators, project managers and staff working to support projects and proposals.

October 12 & 13, 2017

OBJECTIVES: Demystify Federal regulations and guidelines:

  • What is the Risk Management Framework and why should we care?
  • Does compliance equal security OR security equal compliance?
  • Is FISMA more than a “check box” exercise?
  • How can security training lead to measurable threat awareness?
  • Will revised Federal Acquisition Regulation impact my contracts?
  • How can budgets and proposals be managed for compliance?
  • How do we get started?
  • How do we factor costs into proposal budgets and justifications?
  • Is the protection of Controlled Unclassified Information (CUI) applicable to research?
  • How can security and privacy controls be integrated into the user environment?
  • Will compliance impact awards and cash flow?

… and many more questions may need clarification

Keynote Speakers
Dr. Ronald Ross, NIST Fellow and Director FISMA Project
Mark Riddle, Senior Program Analyst NARA Information Security Oversight
To learn more: https://www2.cisl.ucar.edu/events/workshops/cybersecurity-partnership, or email: cyber-partnership@ucar.edu
To register: https://www.regonline.com/builder/site/?eventid=2027735

 

Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
CG1
Room:
1210, 1212, 1214 (auditorium)

Posted by Cecilia Banner (banner@ucar.edu) at x1231
Will this event be webcast?
Yes - CG1-Auditorium - http://ucarconnect.ucar.edu/live
Tuesday, September 26, 2017 - 2:00pm

Extreme ocean waves and climate change in the Gulf of Mexico

Dr. Christian M. Appendini  | Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), Campus Sisal - Yucatan, Institute of Engineering

Most extreme waves in the Gulf of Mexico result from either tropical cyclones or anticyclone systems known as Nortes. Waves from tropical cyclones sometimes have devastating consequences but a low rate of occurrence, while Nortes frequently occur during autumn/winter and generate waves that disrupt maritime activities. While current planning practices for maritime operations and marine infrastructure design standards are based on historical data, climate change will likely affect such conditions during the coming years and into the 22nd century. Most projections of General Circulation Models significantly underestimate the maximum wind speeds of tropical cyclones. Meanwhile, the short historical record and low frequency of tropical cyclones pose additional hindrances to the estimation of true return rates. This work analyzes waves from tropical cyclones based on synthetic events to overcome these limitations. The effect of climate change on structure design is illustrated by the 100-year return periods for the present and the future climates. For the Norte-driven waves, a method to identify events is presented, as well as a classification of events based on wave power. The assessment of the effects of climate change on the Norte-driven waves is accomplished by evaluating the change of frequency for the different types of Nortes. In conclusion, the study shows that the extreme wave climate in the Gulf of Mexico due to climate change is expected to be characterized by an intensification of the waves generated by tropical cyclones, a lower occurrence of intense events generated by Nortes, and an increased occurrence of mild Norte events. As such, the design of maritime structures should consider an intensification of the design waves, due to tropical cyclones, and the operational design maritime structures should consider a lower occurrence of extreme events as a result of Nortes.  

Tuesday, September 26, 2017
2:00 PM-3:00 PM
FL2-1001

Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
FL2
Room:
1001

Posted by Jessa Johnson (jessaj@ucar.edu) at x2751
Hosting lab/division or program:
JNT
Will this event be webcast?
Wednesday, September 27, 2017 - 1:30pm

The statistical study of solar dimmings and their eruptive counterparts

Results are presented from analyzing the physical and morphological properties of 154 dimmings (transient coronal holes) and the associated flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Each dimming in the catalog was processed with the semi-automated Coronal Dimming Tracker (CoDiT) using Solar Dynamics Observatory AIA 193 Å observations and HMI magnetograms. Instead of the typically used difference images, the transient dark regions were detected “directly” in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) images. This allowed us to study dimmings as the footpoints of CMEs—in contrast with the larger, diffuse dimmings seen in difference images that represent the projected view of the rising, expanding plasma. Studying the footpoint-dimming morphology allowed us to better understand the CME structure in the low corona. While comparing the physical properties of dimmings, flares, and CMEs, the relationships between the different parts of this complex eruptive phenomenon were identified: larger dimmings were found to be longer-lived, which suggests that it takes longer to “close down” large open magnetic regions. During their growth phase, smaller dimmings were found to acquire a higher magnetic flux imbalance (i. e., become more unipolar) than larger dimmings. Furthermore, the EUV intensity of dimmings (indicative of local electron density) was found to correlate with how much plasma was removed and how energetic the eruption was. Studying the morphology of dimmings (single, double, fragmented) also helped identify different configurations of the quasi-open magnetic field.

Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
CG1
Room:
2126

Posted by Sheryl Shapiro (sheryls@ucar.edu) at x1567
Hosting lab/division or program:
HAO
Will this event be webcast?
Wednesday, October 18, 2017 - 1:30pm

Medium-Range Thermosphere Ionosphere Storm Forecasts and the Space Weather Forecast Testbed

Forecasting natural phenomena is a way that scientific understanding can bring societal benefits. However, the link between scientific knowledge and predictability of natural phenomena is not a straightforward one. As part of the NASA/NSF Partnership For Collaborative Space Weather Modeling, we are emphasizing methods of improving predictive skill in the thermosphere-ionosphere (T-I) for medium-range forecasts, defined as forecasts initiated after a driving solar event such as a coronal mass ejection (CME) has been detected. For such forecasts with lead times of 1-4 days, our approach is meant to provide quantitative measures of forecast skill despite varying degrees of scientific understanding, and despite environmental factors that are often poorly constrained. Using community models of the coupled thermosphere-ionosphere system as a basis, we are developing forecasting tools that help understand the factors limiting predictability in different situations. We will describe our algorithms for “forecast variables” (FVs) that are quantities derived from model outputs and observations. FVs are designed to provide insight into what limits predictive skill under geomagnetic storm conditions. We will describe a tool we have developed, the Space Weather Forecast Testbed (SWFT), which enables users to explore relationships between upper atmospheric characteristics and geospace and solar wind variables. SWFT contains more than 10 years of ionospheric observations in the form of Global Ionosphere Maps (GIM) produced daily over that past 20 years by JPL. SWFT also contains a database of post-processed solar parameters such as solar wind velocity, ion density, temperature, magnetic field, the F10.7 and sunspot indices and geomagnetic indices. The algorithms in SWFT permit users to develop statistical forecasts using techniques adapted from machine learning, or "big data" approaches. SWFT prepares us for a transition to upper atmosphere forecasting using first-principles models, using solar wind forecasts as the basis for upper atmosphere forecasts. SWFT is currently being transitioned to the NASA/NSF Community Coordinated Modeling Center for community use.

Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
CG1
Room:
2126

Posted by Sheryl Shapiro (sheryls@ucar.edu) at x1567
Hosting lab/division or program:
HAO
Will this event be webcast?
No
Monday, October 2, 2017 - 9:00am
Paleoclimate reanalysis workshop Oct. 2-3, Boulder, CO
The Last Millennium Reanalysis team invites your participation in its third workshop, to be held Oct 2-3 at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (Mesa Lab) in Boulder, CO. Paleoclimate data assimilation is emerging as a novel tool to understand low-frequency climate dynamics, blending multi-proxy paleoclimate observations with numerical simulations of Earth’s climate.  Previous workshops have investigated the use of proxy system modeling (2015) and modeling stable water isotopes in the climate system (2016). This workshop will share the project’s latest reconstructions and provide a forum to discuss relevant findings on the climate of the Common Era.  The event will focus on validating the approach against complementary datasets and investigations of low-frequency climate dynamics made possible by this framework. The meeting will be followed by a 1-day hackathon on October 4 to provide graduate students and early-career scientists with hands-on training to use the newly available data and code to perform experiments, manipulate the output, and analyze results..  Limited travel support is available for both events, with priority given to junior participants.  Registration and information are available at https://www.regonline.com/LMR.  Address questions to Loretta Quinn at UCAR (lquinn@ucar.edu).  Early registration for the meeting and the preferred meeting Hotel, the Best Western Plus Boulder Inn, is encouraged.
 
We look forward to seeing you in Boulder,
-The LMR team (David Anderson, Julien Emil-Geay, Greg Hakim, and Eric Steig)
Type of event:
Workshop
Building:
Mesa Lab
Room:
Main Seminar

Posted by Loretta Quinn (lquinn@ucar.edu) at x8670
Will this event be webcast?
No
Friday, September 29, 2017 - 6:00pm

Parents’ Night Out is a great opportunity for you and your significant other to go out to dinner and a movie!

Contact Stephanie Ivancic, Director of KinderCare Learning Center at UCAR, to sign your child up from 6 pm - 8 pm ($30 for one child or $40 for two children) or 6 pm - 10 pm ($50 for one child and $60 for two children).

Children are welcome to wear their pajamas for a fun evening of movies and pizza! If your child has a video that he or she would like to share, bring it along! Please make sure it is labeled and let the fun begin! Siblings under the age of 7 are welcome, too.

We invite all UCAR employees to take advantage of this fun evening as your child does not need to be enrolled at the KinderCare Learning Center at UCAR to partake! 

Mark your calendars for future dates:   Friday,October 13 & 27; November 10: December 1 & 15

Please contact Stephanie Ivancic for enrollment as well as drop-in care rates.  Stephanie’s email address is sivancic@cclc.comand her phone number is 303-443-5595.

Type of event:
No event type category

Posted by Laurie Carr (lcarr@ucar.edu) at x8702
Hosting lab/division or program:
Human Resources