Staff Notes Daily Calendar Events

Monday, February 8, 2016 - 2:00pm

NOAA’s recent, upcoming and longer-term plan to use low

altitude, air-deployed UAS in severe storm environments

Dr. Joseph J. Cione

NOAA Earth Systems Research Laboratory

Monday, 8 February 2016 at 2 pm

Foothills Laboratory Building 2, Room 3107


The hurricane boundary layer is the lowest layer of the atmosphere where momentum is exchanged with the surface and where heat and moisture are extracted from the ocean. As such, this region of the storm is critical as it relates to tropical cyclone formation, maintenance, intensification and weakening. Despite the inherent importance of this environment, flight safety risks currently limit the routine collection of wind, pressure, temperature and moisture observations near the ocean-atmosphere interface. In-situ measurements below 500m in high wind hurricane conditions are typically from point-source, instantaneous, GPS dropsonde observations. The lack of continuous data coverage at low levels is a primary reason why hurricane boundary layer structure and associated physical processes within this critical region of the storm remain poorly understood and inadequately represented in today’s operational models. In turn, inadequate representation of physical processes often leads to errors in data initialization and assimilation, which can adversely impact the accuracy of subsequent hurricane forecasts. It is believed that an improved understanding of boundary layer processes, through targeted, enhanced and continuous observation using low altitude unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) will be essential in order to significantly improve scientific understanding and future predictions of hurricane structure and intensity. In 2014 NOAA conducted the first-ever air-deployed, UAS experiments into a tropical cyclone environment. On 16 September 2014 Raytheon’s 13lb, 5-ft wingspan Coyote UAS was deployed into the eye of Major Hurricane Edouard. At an approximate altitude of 880m, the UAS penetrated Edouard’s western eyewall and recorded platform record-breaking winds of 50m/s as it proceeded to ‘orbit’ this high wind region during its historic 28-min inaugural mission. On 17 September a second successful P-3/Coyote UAS flight was conducted. This event set endurance records for the Coyote platform as it remained airborne within the hurricane boundary layer for 68 min (at controlled altitudes ranging from 400-800m). Recent analyses from these flights have validated Coyote UAS measurements using nearby observations from GPS sondes and wind estimates from P-3 tail Doppler radar. Results from these two inaugural flights along with NOAA’s future plans to use low altitude UAS in hurricanes will be discussed. In addition, preliminary comparisons of air-sea observations from buoys, GPS sondes and ocean probes with coupled output from NOAA’s Hurricane Weather Research and Forecasting modeling system will be presented

Presenter(s):
Dr. Joseph J. Cione
Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
FL2
Room:
3107
Will this event be webcast by NCAR/UCAR?
No

Posted by Rhonda Moore (rhonda@ucar.edu) at x8389
Lab/division hosting the event:
NCAR, RAL
Affiliation or organization:
Monday, February 8, 2016 - 3:30pm

Chemical analyses of trace species present in ice cores are routinely used to investigate the impact of natural variation and anthropogenic influence on past environment and climate. Much of this previous work has focused on characterizing the inorganic species in the cores, including sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, and black carbon, while the organic species have received relatively less attention.  In part this is due to the chemical complexity and low abundance of the organic species, which makes identification and quantification difficult. In this work, we use high-resolution mass spectrometry to measure the soot, inorganic, and organic species present in an ice core from Northern Greenland that spans from 269 AD to 2013 AD. We examine the bulk organic composition and use tracer ions and co-variance with inorganic species to identify how the organic matter is influenced by biomass burning, marine emissions, and anthropogenic emissions.  Additionally, we discuss how the composition and abundance of reactive nitrogen has changed over this time period and how these changes motivate our current research on organic nitrogen chemistry. 

Date:  Monday, February 8, 2016

Time:  3:15 refreshments; 3:30 seminar

FL2-1022, Large Auditorium

Presenter(s):
Eleanor C. Browne
Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
FL2
Room:
1022
Will this event be webcast by NCAR/UCAR?

Posted by Dianne Hodshon (dhodshon@ucar.edu) at x1401
Lab/division hosting the event:
NCAR, ACOM
Affiliation or organization:
Tuesday, February 9, 2016 - 8:30am

This 3.5 day workshop is geared towards new users of the NCAR Command Language (NCL), a scripting language for the analysis and visualization of geoscientific data. It will consist of a combination of introductory lectures and hands-on labs. During the labs, the instructors will work with students one-on-one to help them write NCL programs for analyzing their own data.

The instructors are Dennis Shea, an associate scientist in NCAR/CGD, and Mary Haley, a software engineer in NCAR/CISL.

Students are expected to have a basic knowledge of programming in one or more languages like Fortran, C, Python, IDL, or matlab, and must be comfortable working on a UNIX system.

Registration is free and limited to 16 students, so be sure to register as soon as possible. See the link below for more information.

Presenter(s):
Dennis Shea, Mary Haley
Type of event:
Workshop
Building:
CG2
Room:
3024
Will this event be webcast by NCAR/UCAR?
No

Posted by Mary Haley (haley@ucar.edu) at x1254
Lab/division hosting the event:
NCAR, CISL, TDD
Affiliation or organization:
Wednesday, February 10, 2016 - 12:00pm

Climate change poses several issues for the statistical modeling of extremes. One issue concerns how to introduce non-stationarity into extreme value distributions for extreme weather and climate variables. The most common approach entails using time as a covariate through one or more of the parameters of extreme value distributions. For precipitation (with an apparent heavy tail and high variation on small spatial and temporal scales), this approach is usually unable to detect trends when applied to single sites. Rather, borrowing strength across space (termed regional analysis in hydrology) will be necessary, but would require accounting for the spatial dependence of extremes.

Another issue concerns what is an appropriate measure of the risk of non-stationary extreme events (e.g., for use in engineering design). Under a stationary climate, the risk of extreme events is usually measured in terms of a return level with a specified return period (i.e., a high quantile such as the so-called "100-year flood"). Under nonstationarity, I advocate abandoning the concept of return level and, instead, using the Design Life Level, a measure based on a desired "risk of failure" over a specified design period. The Design Life Level corresponds to a high quantile of the distribution of the maximum of the variable over the design period. For illustrative purposes, two real-world examples are used, one involving peak streamflow and another precipitation extremes.

Presenter(s):
Rick Katz
Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
Mesa Lab
Room:
680, Tower B
Will this event be webcast by NCAR/UCAR?
No

Posted by Kathy Peczkowicz (kathyp@ucar.edu) at x2431
Lab/division hosting the event:
NCAR, CISL, IMAGe
Affiliation or organization:
Wednesday, February 10, 2016 - 1:30pm

Babcock-Leighton solar dynamo: the role of radial pumping and the equatorward propagation of activity

The generation of poloidal field through the decay and dispersal of tilted bipolar active regions on the solar surface is observed. Parameterizing this process for the generation of poloidal field and by including an observed differential rotation for the generation of toroidal field we develop a kinematic dynamo model. When a meridional circulation--poleward near the surface and equatorward near the bottom--is included in this model, most of the basic features of the solar cycle, including the equatorward migration of the toroidal field, are reproduced. This is consistent with the previous flux transport dynamo models. However, when a radially downward magnetic pumping near the surface is included, the poloidal field becomes predominately radial which allows the negative radial shear in the near-surface layer to act on the radial field to produce a toroidal field. This consequently causes the dynamo wave with an equatorward migration of the toroidal field. In this scenario, we observe a clear equatorward migration of the toroidal field at low latitudes even when there is no meridional flow near the bottom or when there is a shallow meridional circulation with no flow underneath. Furthermore, the magnetic pumping suppresses the diffusion of fields at the surface which helps to achieve the 11-year dynamo cycle at a moderately larger value of magnetic diffusivity.

Presenter(s):
Bidya Binay Karak
Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
CG1
Room:
2126
Will this event be webcast by NCAR/UCAR?
No

Posted by Sheryl Shapiro (sheryls@ucar.edu) at x1567
Lab/division hosting the event:
NCAR, HAO
Affiliation or organization:
Thursday, February 11, 2016 - 10:00am

Monthly Web Advisory Group meeting. Review February meeting agenda for details!

WAG Purpose & Goals 
Develop policies and strategies, recommend technologies and coordinate existing expertise and infrastructure related to UCAR’s use of the WWW. The scope of the committee covers a broad range of web-specific aspects of UCAR’s IT and includes hardware, software, design, and maintenance.

Presenter(s):
David Vance and Terri Hamner co-chairs
Type of event:
No event type category
Building:
CG1
Room:
3131
Will this event be webcast by NCAR/UCAR?
No

Posted by Terri Hamner (thamner@ucar.edu) at x8927
Lab/division hosting the event:
NCAR/UCAR-Wide Groups
Affiliation or organization:
Thursday, February 11, 2016 - 3:30pm

Certain aspects of the hurricane boundary layer (HBL) are closely tied to overall hurricane intensity and structure.  However, observations within the HBL of strong hurricanes are rare, primarily because conditions in the HBL are hazardous.  Numerical simulations offer an opportunity to help interpret these few observations and, in principle, simulations can provide datasets for applications that need high-resolution depictions of the HBL.  This talk will describe two techniques developed in MMM to study the HBL using large eddy simulation.  For one technique, the numerical-model domain encompasses the entire inner core of a hurricane, including the hurricane eye, eyewall, and primary rainbands.  This technique provides the most complete picture of HBLs, and can be used to study the strongest gusts within hurricanes (i.e., those in the eyewall).  However, this “complex” technique is very expensive computationally, and thus only a small part of the parameter space of hurricane sizes and intensities can be studied.  More recently, a second technique was developed that uses much smaller domains encompassing only a portion of a hurricane.  For this “simple” technique, the mesoscale structure of the hurricane needs to be specified, by the model user, using a small number of input parameters.  Efforts to evaluate these two techniques are hampered by the aforementioned lack of observations in the HBL, although comparisons of model output with NOAA P3 data are encouraging. 

Presenter(s):
George Bryan
Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
FL2
Room:
1022
Will this event be webcast by NCAR/UCAR?

Posted by Wendy Hawkins (whawkins@ucar.edu) at x1552
Lab/division hosting the event:
NCAR, MMM
Affiliation or organization:
Tuesday, February 16, 2016 - 11:00am

Unprecedented climate change in the Arctic, particularly the reduction in summer sea ice has opened up opportunities for business in diverse sectors such as fossil fuel & mineral extraction, shipping and tourism. Recent studies have indicated that sea ice is a major source of climate predictability on seasonal and longer timescales, but this potential is yet to be realised in actual prediction systems. In this talk I will discuss where we are in terms of predicting Arctic sea ice on seasonal and longer timescales, what the major sources of predictability are, and what I see as the road ahead to achieve this potential. 

Presenter(s):
Jonathan Day, University of Reading
Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
Mesa Lab
Room:
Main Seminar Room
Will this event be webcast by NCAR/UCAR?
Yes - ML-Main Seminar Room - http://ucarconnect.ucar.edu/live

Posted by Gaylynn Potemkin (potemkin@ucar.edu) at x1618
Lab/division hosting the event:
NCAR, CGD
Affiliation or organization:
Wednesday, February 17, 2016 - 1:30pm

Simulating Solar Cycles

The existence of solar activity cycles has been recognized for more than 150 years; their influence on the Earth has been known for almost as long. Numerous segments of modern economies are strongly affected by the variable outputs of the Sun—radiation, energetic particles and electromagnetic fields—that are associated with solar activity. Therefore, it is of great value to understand the origins of solar activity, simulate individual cycles, and ultimately to be able to predict the characteristics of the next solar cycle. To do that requires a physical model that can be “calibrated” to the Sun, just as to be of value for weather and climate simulation and prediction, atmospheric dynamical models must be calibrated to atmospheric observations. I will describe a class of model that can be calibrated well for the Sun, namely the so-called Babcock-Leighton flux transport dynamo models. I will review successes achieved with a 2D version of this model, and also, when applied to prediction, what forecasts have been validated and what have not. I will show how the implementation of modern data assimilation methods in the dynamo model can utilize the vast SDO/HMI velocity and magnetic field data to improve the model's simulation capability. Furthermore, accounting for the role of longitude-dependent solar cycle features may significantly improve the model. I will show that nonlinear evolution of global HD/MHD instabilities in the tachocline can create large-scale longitude-dependent patterns of flow and magnetic fields, which can manifest as imprints at the surface. Therefore, I will describe how a 3D comprehensive dynamo model, coupled with a global tachocline instability model, can be built for operation in a data-assimilative mode, to simulate and ultimately predict the longitude-averaged as well as longitude-dependent solar cycle features that project into the interplanetary environment, such as coronal magnetic structures and solar wind streams.

Presenter(s):
Mausumi Dikpati
Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
CG1
Room:
South Auditorium
Will this event be webcast by NCAR/UCAR?
Yes - CG1-Auditorium - http://ucarconnect.ucar.edu/live

Posted by Sheryl Shapiro (sheryls@ucar.edu) at x1567
Lab/division hosting the event:
NCAR, HAO
Affiliation or organization:
Thursday, February 18, 2016 - 1:30pm

Connections between sudden stratosphere warmings and upper atmosphere variability

Sudden stratosphere warmings (SSWs) are dynamical disturbances that occur in the high latitude, wintertime, stratosphere. Though a connection between SSWs and variability in the equatorial ionosphere was initially proposed in the 1970's, it is only in recent years that observations have unequivocally tied upper atmosphere variability to SSWs. A direct coupling between the high-latitude stratosphere and equatorial ionosphere is unanticipated. The connection between SSWs and ionosphere variability is therefore surprising, and several different mechanisms have been proposed to explain this connection. Results from numerical modeling and observational studies aimed at understanding the mechanisms by which SSWs generate upper atmosphere variability will be presented. Model simulations are first used to demonstrate that the variability in the equatorial ionosphere is primarily driven by modulation of dynamo generated electric fields due to changes in the solar and lunar migrating semidiurnal tides. The tidal variability is further shown to modify the global circulation of the upper atmosphere, inducing near-global decreases in the mean thermosphere composition ([O]/[N2]) and ionosphere electron density. The results demonstrate that different mechanisms combine to generate complex upper atmosphere variability during SSWs.

Presenter(s):
Nick Pedatella
Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
CG1
Room:
South Auditorium
Will this event be webcast by NCAR/UCAR?
Yes - CG1-Auditorium - http://ucarconnect.ucar.edu/live

Posted by Sheryl Shapiro (sheryls@ucar.edu) at x1567
Lab/division hosting the event:
NCAR, HAO
Affiliation or organization:
Thursday, February 18, 2016 - 3:30pm

Tornadoes are among nature's most destructive forces. The most violent, long-lived tornadoes form within supercell thunderstorms. Tornadoes ranked EF4 and EF5 on the Enhanced Fujita scale that exhibit long paths are the least common but most damaging and deadly type of tornado.

In this talk, results from numerical simulations of supercells containing violent, long-track tornadoes will be presented, focusing primarily on a 30 meter simulation of a supercell modeled within the 24 May 2011 El Reno, OK supercell environment. Preliminary results from a recent 20 meter simulation of the 24 May 2011 storm will also be presented, including the entire life cycle of a multiple-vortex EF5 tornado which transitions from a single-celled tornado, to a two celled tornado, to a multiple vortex tornado before dissipating. The genesis, maintenance, and decay phases of the tornadoes will be explored using high quality visualization techniques designed to provide insight into the storm.

Presenter(s):
Leigh Orf
Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
FL2
Room:
1022
Will this event be webcast by NCAR/UCAR?

Posted by Caroline Haws (haws@ucar.edu) at x8189
Lab/division hosting the event:
NCAR, MMM
Affiliation or organization:
Friday, February 19, 2016 - 6:00pm

Parent's Night Out is a great opportunity for you and your significant other to get out to dinner and a movie! By emailing the Center Director, Stephanie Ivancic, you could sign your child up from 6pm-8pm ($30 for one child or $40 for two children) or 6pm-10pm ($50 for one child and $60 for two children).

Children are welcome to wear their pajamas for a fun evening of movies and pizza! If your child has a video that he or she would like to share, bring it in. Please make sure it is labeled and let the fun begin! Siblings under the age of 7 are welcome as well.

We are inviting all UCAR employees to take advantage of this as your child does not need to be enrolled at the center to partake!

Children’s Creative Learning Center (CCLC)
Stephanie Ivancic (sivancic@cclc.com)
3050 34th Street, Boulder
http://www.cclc.com/our-centers/boulder/co/000674/

Presenter(s):
Children’s Creative Learning Center
Type of event:
Wellness/Benefits
Building:
CCLC: 3050 34th Street, Boulder
Will this event be webcast by NCAR/UCAR?
No

Posted by Laurie Carr (lcarr@ucar.edu) at x8702
Lab/division hosting the event:
UCAR
Affiliation or organization:
Tuesday, February 23, 2016 - 11:00am

This seminar will give an overview of the many facets of deriving and implementing a new transport scheme into the state-of-the-art climate model CAM (Community Atmosphere Model). To meet the challenge of high computational throughput on supercomputers for many-tracer climate/weather applications and demands for increased accuracy and consistency, a new tracer transport scheme has been developed (CSLAM – Conservative semi-Lagrangian Multi-tracer Transport scheme). To achieve important aspects of accuracy such as mass-conservation, shape-preservation, optimal maintenance of correlations as well as consistency, the coupling of the transport scheme and the dynamical core is crucial and often overlooked. A novel algorithm for coupling finite-volume schemes, such as CSLAM, with spectral element dynamics (CAM-SE) will be presented. Introducing CSLAM into CAM-SE has motivated a separation of the grid on which physical parameterizations are computed and the grid used by the dynamical core. This opens avenues for novel research on physics-dynamics coupling. 

Presenter(s):
Peter Lauritzen, NCAR/CGD
Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
Mesa Lab
Room:
Main Seminar room
Will this event be webcast by NCAR/UCAR?
Yes - ML-Main Seminar Room - http://ucarconnect.ucar.edu/live

Posted by Gaylynn Potemkin (potemkin@ucar.edu) at x1618
Lab/division hosting the event:
NCAR, CGD
Affiliation or organization:
Wednesday, February 24, 2016 - 3:30pm

The current generation of models has followed a myriad of different development paths, making it difficult to identify a clear path to model improvement. Model comparison studies have been undertaken to explore model differences, but have not been able to meaningfully attribute inter-model differences to individual model components because there are often too many differences among the participating models. Model comparison studies have therefore provided limited insight into the causes of differences in model behavior, and model development has relied on the inspiration and experience of individual modelers rather than on a systematic analysis of model shortcomings. 


This presentation introduces a unified approach to process-based hydrologic modeling to enable controlled and systematic evaluation of different modeling approaches. Our model framework, called the Structure for Unifying Multiple Modeling Alternatives (SUMMA), formulates a general set of conservation equations, providing the flexibility to experiment with different spatial representations, different flux parameterizations, different model parameter values, and different time stepping schemes. We present a series of case studies to illustrate how the SUMMA framework enables users to decompose the modeling problem into the individual decisions made as part of model development, and evaluate different model development decisions in a systematic and controlled way.

Presenter(s):
Martyn Clark
Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
FL2
Room:
1022
Will this event be webcast by NCAR/UCAR?

Posted by Rhonda Moore (rhonda@ucar.edu) at x8389
Lab/division hosting the event:
NCAR, RAL, HAP
Affiliation or organization:
Wednesday, March 2, 2016 - 12:00pm

How unsteady winds can fuel phytoplankton blooms at fronts in the upper ocean

Daniel Whitt

University of Cambridge

Abstract:

Observations and models suggest that upper-ocean density fronts sometimes exhibit higher chlorophyll, more biomass and/or different plankton community composition at and/or below the surface in a narrow region localized to the front. However, the dynamics that lead to biogeochemical anomalies at fronts are not fully understood. 

In this talk, I will briefly review observations of anomalous biogeochemistry at fronts in the upper ocean. Then, I will present some results from an ongoing numerical process study of how the unsteady part of the wind stress frequency spectrum can sustain higher upward nutrient fluxes and plankton biomass at geostrophic fronts. In particular, I will use experiments with a wind-forced primitive-equation model of an idealized geostrophic front coupled to a four-component ecosystem model to illustrate a synergistic interaction between stronger low frequency (sub-inertial) and weaker high frequency (near-inertial) parts of the wind stress. In this scenario, the addition of a weak high-frequency stress to a strong low-frequency stress leads to a qualitative change from deep biomass maximum to surface bloom and a large increase in the depth-integrated biomass at the front. I will discuss the physics that lead to this biogeochemical sensitivity and the potential implications for other ocean biogeochemical models with different levels of the high-frequency wind stress variance and/or mesoscale-submesoscale geostrophic kinetic energy.

Wednesday, 2 March 2016  

12:00 - 1:00 pm

Mesa Lab, 1850 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, CO

ML-239 - Damon Room

Presenter(s):
Daniel Whitt
Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
Mesa Lab
Room:
ML239 - Damon Room
Will this event be webcast by NCAR/UCAR?
No

Posted by Teresa Foster (teresaf@ucar.edu) at x1741
Lab/division hosting the event:
NCAR, CGD
Affiliation or organization:
Friday, March 4, 2016 - 6:00pm

Parent's Night Out is a great opportunity for you and your significant other to get out to dinner and a movie! By emailing the Center Director, Stephanie Ivancic, you could sign your child up from 6pm-8pm ($30 for one child or $40 for two children) or 6pm-10pm ($50 for one child and $60 for two children).

Children are welcome to wear their pajamas for a fun evening of movies and pizza! If your child has a video that he or she would like to share, bring it in. Please make sure it is labeled and let the fun begin! Siblings under the age of 7 are welcome as well.

We are inviting all UCAR employees to take advantage of this as your child does not need to be enrolled at the center to partake!

Children’s Creative Learning Center (CCLC)
Stephanie Ivancic (sivancic@cclc.com)
3050 34th Street, Boulder
http://www.cclc.com/our-centers/boulder/co/000674/


Presenter(s):
Children’s Creative Learning Center
Type of event:
Wellness/Benefits
Building:
CCLC: 3050 34th Street, Boulder
Will this event be webcast by NCAR/UCAR?
No

Posted by Laurie Carr (lcarr@ucar.edu) at x8702
Lab/division hosting the event:
UCAR
Affiliation or organization:
Monday, March 7, 2016 - 11:00am

ACOM Seminar - Lynne E. Gratz Assistant Professor, Environmental Program Colorado College

Atmospheric Mercury from the Boundary Layer to the Free Troposphere: Airborne Observations of Emissions, Transport, and Chemistry, Environmental Program Colorado College

Abstract:

Mercury (Hg) is a bioaccumulative neurotoxin that is emitted to the atmosphere from both natural and anthropogenic sources. Once in the atmosphere, chemistry and transport are fundamental in determining the introduction of Hg to terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. While gaseous elemental mercury (Hg(0)) may remain in the atmosphere for months, chemical conversion to the more soluble oxidized form (Hg(II)) facilitates atmospheric deposition. Characterizing the relative atmospheric emissions from major sources and deciphering the mechanism for atmospheric Hg(0) oxidation are therefore paramount to understanding the global Hg cycle. During the 2013 Nitrogen, Oxidants, Mercury and Aerosol Distributions, Sources and Sinks (NOMADSS) campaign, airborne Hg measurements were collected in the eastern U.S. to (1) constrain Hg emissions from major source regions, and (2) identify the mechanism for enhanced Hg(II) in the free troposphere. Two case studies are presented addressing these objectives. First, measurements of total atmospheric Hg, carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NOx), and sulfur dioxide (SO2) are used to characterize emissions from the Chicago/Gary urban/industrial area with respect to the U.S. EPA National Emissions Inventory (NEI). FLEXPART model analyses suggest that there are many small emission sources that are not fully accounted for within the inventory, and/or that the re-emission of legacy Hg is a significant source of Hg to the atmosphere in this region. Second, measurements in a free tropospheric air mass over Texas are used to investigate the mechanism for atmospheric Hg oxidation, which is purportedly induced by bromine radicals but direct observational evidence for this process has been unavailable. Results of a chemical box model for the sampled air mass support the role of bromine as the dominant oxidant of Hg in the upper troposphere. These and other NOMADSS results collectively provide important new insight into the atmospheric emissions, transport, and chemistry that influence global Hg cycling.

Date:  Monday, March 7, 2016

Time:  10:45 refreshments; 11:00 seminar

FL2-1001, Small Auditorium

Presenter(s):
Lynne E. Gratz Assistant Professor
Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
FL2
Room:
1001
Will this event be webcast by NCAR/UCAR?
No

Posted by Dianne Hodshon (dhodshon@ucar.edu) at x1401
Lab/division hosting the event:
NCAR, ACOM
Affiliation or organization:
Friday, March 18, 2016 - 6:00pm

Parent's Night Out is a great opportunity for you and your significant other to get out to dinner and a movie! By emailing the Center Director, Stephanie Ivancic, you could sign your child up from 6pm-8pm ($30 for one child or $40 for two children) or 6pm-10pm ($50 for one child and $60 for two children).

Children are welcome to wear their pajamas for a fun evening of movies and pizza! If your child has a video that he or she would like to share, bring it in. Please make sure it is labeled and let the fun begin! Siblings under the age of 7 are welcome as well.

We are inviting all UCAR employees to take advantage of this as your child does not need to be enrolled at the center to partake!

Children’s Creative Learning Center (CCLC)
Stephanie Ivancic (sivancic@cclc.com)
3050 34th Street, Boulder
http://www.cclc.com/our-centers/boulder/co/000674/

Presenter(s):
Children’s Creative Learning Center
Type of event:
Wellness/Benefits
Building:
CCLC: 3050 34th Street, Boulder
Will this event be webcast by NCAR/UCAR?
No

Posted by Laurie Carr (lcarr@ucar.edu) at x8702
Lab/division hosting the event:
UCAR
Affiliation or organization:
Monday, March 28, 2016 - 8:00am

CISL is excited to announce a new series of short courses coordinated by the Institute for Mathematics Applied to Geosciences:  “Beyond P-values”.  This series is aimed at  NCAR  staff and visitors with an interest in acquiring more advanced statistical and data analysis skills. 

Each course will provide a targeted selection of topics in a  specific statistical subject taught by experts in that area. The instruction will be data-driven and will include hands-on teaching of statistical software tools.  The courses will last two to three days and will be limited to a small number of participants to provide high quality one-on-one support by the instructors and additional coaches.  The first course in the series is on the Statistics of Extremes and will take place March 28th through March 30th.  Details on the course agenda and registration can be found here.

Presenter(s):
Dorit Hammerling
Type of event:
Tutorial/Training
Building:
Fleischman
Will this event be webcast by NCAR/UCAR?
No

Posted by Kathy Peczkowicz (kathyp@ucar.edu) at x2431
Lab/division hosting the event:
NCAR, CISL, CISL/IMAGe
Affiliation or organization:
Wednesday, March 30, 2016 - 1:30pm

Suomi NPP’s Day/Night Band Changes the Nightscape of Satellite Remote Sensing

Daytime measurements of reflected sunlight at visible-light wavelengths have been a mainstay of Earth-viewing radiometers since the advent of environmental satellites. At night, optical spectrum radiometers traditionally have been limited to measures of thermal infrared emission, which provide relatively poor information content for many important weather and climate parameters. These deficiencies have in turn limited our ability to characterize the full diurnal behavior of parameters relevant to improved monitoring, understanding and modeling of weather and climate processes. Visible-spectrum light information does in fact exist during the nighttime hours, originating from a wide variety of sources, but its detection requires specialized technology. Such measurements have existed, in a limited way, on U.S. Department of Defense satellites, but the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP) satellite, which carries a Day/Night Band (DNB) radiometer, now offers the first quantitative measurements of nocturnal visible light. Here, we review through striking imagery examples the paradigm shift in nocturnal low-light visible applications enabled by the DNB. Via a combination of terrestrial and extraterrestrial light sources, we show that visible observations are indeed always available—including moonless nights. The measurements expand many current applications while enabling entirely new and unexpected ones as well. These novel low-light measurements illuminate a wealth of heretofore untrodden interdisciplinary research pathways while providing key insight for the optimized design of follow-on low-light visible sensors.

Presenter(s):
Steve Miller
Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
CG1
Room:
South Auditorium
Will this event be webcast by NCAR/UCAR?

Posted by Sheryl Shapiro (sheryls@ucar.edu) at x1567
Lab/division hosting the event:
NCAR, HAO
Affiliation or organization:
Friday, April 1, 2016 - 6:00pm

Parent's Night Out is a great opportunity for you and your significant other to get out to dinner and a movie! By emailing the Center Director, Stephanie Ivancic, you could sign your child up from 6pm-8pm ($30 for one child or $40 for two children) or 6pm-10pm ($50 for one child and $60 for two children).

Children are welcome to wear their pajamas for a fun evening of movies and pizza! If your child has a video that he or she would like to share, bring it in. Please make sure it is labeled and let the fun begin! Siblings under the age of 7 are welcome as well.

We are inviting all UCAR employees to take advantage of this as your child does not need to be enrolled at the center to partake!

Children’s Creative Learning Center (CCLC)
Stephanie Ivancic (sivancic@cclc.com)
3050 34th Street, Boulder
http://www.cclc.com/our-centers/boulder/co/000674/

Presenter(s):
Children’s Creative Learning Center
Type of event:
Wellness/Benefits
Building:
CCLC: 3050 34th Street, Boulder
Will this event be webcast by NCAR/UCAR?
No

Posted by Laurie Carr (lcarr@ucar.edu) at x8702
Lab/division hosting the event:
UCAR
Affiliation or organization:
Friday, April 15, 2016 - 6:00pm

Parent's Night Out is a great opportunity for you and your significant other to get out to dinner and a movie! By emailing the Center Director, Stephanie Ivancic, you could sign your child up from 6pm-8pm ($30 for one child or $40 for two children) or 6pm-10pm ($50 for one child and $60 for two children).

Children are welcome to wear their pajamas for a fun evening of movies and pizza! If your child has a video that he or she would like to share, bring it in. Please make sure it is labeled and let the fun begin! Siblings under the age of 7 are welcome as well.

We are inviting all UCAR employees to take advantage of this as your child does not need to be enrolled at the center to partake!

Children’s Creative Learning Center (CCLC)
Stephanie Ivancic (sivancic@cclc.com)
3050 34th Street, Boulder
http://www.cclc.com/our-centers/boulder/co/000674/

Presenter(s):
Children’s Creative Learning Center
Type of event:
Wellness/Benefits
Building:
CCLC: 3050 34th Street, Boulder
Will this event be webcast by NCAR/UCAR?
No

Posted by Laurie Carr (lcarr@ucar.edu) at x8702
Lab/division hosting the event:
UCAR
Affiliation or organization:
Friday, April 29, 2016 - 6:00pm

Parent's Night Out is a great opportunity for you and your significant other to get out to dinner and a movie! By emailing the Center Director, Stephanie Ivancic, you could sign your child up from 6pm-8pm ($30 for one child or $40 for two children) or 6pm-10pm ($50 for one child and $60 for two children).

Children are welcome to wear their pajamas for a fun evening of movies and pizza! If your child has a video that he or she would like to share, bring it in. Please make sure it is labeled and let the fun begin! Siblings under the age of 7 are welcome as well.

We are inviting all UCAR employees to take advantage of this as your child does not need to be enrolled at the center to partake!

Children’s Creative Learning Center (CCLC)
Stephanie Ivancic (sivancic@cclc.com)
3050 34th Street, Boulder
http://www.cclc.com/our-centers/boulder/co/000674/

Presenter(s):
Children’s Creative Learning Center
Type of event:
Wellness/Benefits
Building:
CCLC: 3050 34th Street, Boulder
Will this event be webcast by NCAR/UCAR?
No

Posted by Laurie Carr (lcarr@ucar.edu) at x8702
Lab/division hosting the event:
UCAR
Affiliation or organization: