UCAR

2011 holiday party blends awards and memories


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UCAR Community Art Program Art Reception -- Dec. 10

The UCAR Community Art Program cordially invites you to an art reception for oil painter Olga Karpeisky and acrylic and mixed media painter Joan Jordan. The reception is Saturday December 10th from 4:00 to 7:00 pm in the NCAR Mesa Lab cafeteria 1850 Table Mesa Dr. Boulder, CO. Small appetizers and non-alcohol drinks will be served. Come meet the artists and be inspired by their beautiful artwork! Hope to see you there!

Happy Holiday's and Warmest Wishes for the New Year!

Thank you!

Audrey Lewis

 

UCAR publishes guidance to next presidential administration and Congress

BOULDER, Colo. — The University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR) has published guidance for the next U.S. presidential administration and Congress on the importance of better understanding and predicting weather, water, climate, and other aspects of the Earth system.A UCAR white paper emphasizes that focused investment of federal resources in the atmospheric, Earth, and related sciences will make significant contributions addressing important societal needs. These include protection of lives and property, expansion of new economic opportunities, enhancement of national security, and strengthening U.S. leadership in research and development."More than ever, federal support of research and education into the Earth system is critical to the nation," said UCAR President Antonio J. Busalacchi. "We are on the verge of a new era of prediction, based on understanding how the entire Earth system works. This will have a direct positive impact on lives and livelihoods."UCAR is a nonprofit consortium of 110 member colleges and universities.The white paper proposes federal support for advancing computer models, new observing systems, and more powerful computing resources, as well as a strong science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education system. Its proposals include a National Academies' decadal survey, involving representatives of the public and private sectors, which would develop priorities for weather research and forecasting."The United States should be the unambiguous leader in predicting weather, water, climate, and related systems," Busalacchi said. "Transforming this knowledge into action will allow our nation and the world to effectively respond and adapt to changing environmental conditions."UCAR federal government transition resources can be found here. 

UCAR/NCAR statement on the passing of Ralph J. Cicerone

Ralph Cicerone pictured at NCAR in the 1980s. (©UCAR. Photo by Ginger Hein. This image is freely available for media & nonprofit use.)The National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) and the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR) join colleagues in the Earth system science community and beyond in mourning the loss of renowned atmospheric scientist Ralph J. Cicerone, who died on Nov. 5.Dr. Cicerone left his job as a research chemist at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography in 1980 to join NCAR, where he led the Atmospheric Chemistry Division. In 1989, Dr. Cicerone took on a new challenge, accepting an offer to build an interdisciplinary department of geosciences at the University of California, Irvine.  "Ralph was a pioneer in thinking about the Earth as a connected system," said UCAR President Antonio J. Busalacchi. "His willingness to work across disciplines in pursuit of a deeper understanding of how the pieces of the Earth system fit together set an example for atmospheric scientists and helped set the research direction for our community as well as the whole of the National Academy of Sciences. His loss will be deeply felt at NCAR, UCAR, and far beyond."Read Dr. Cicerone's full obituary at the National Academy of Sciences webpage. 

Applying indigenous and Western knowledge to environmental research

November 3, 2016 | Native American researchers, students, and community members will partner with Western science organizations to help shape mutually beneficial research projects as part of a two-year National Science Foundation grant awarded recently to the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research. UCAR manages the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) under sponsorship by NSF.The project marks a milestone in collaborations between NCAR|UCAR and Native American partners to increase the presence of indigenous perspectives and participants in geoscience research. It also comes at a time when indigenous people are among the hardest-hit by climate change, with several communities forming America's first wave of climate refugees.Aimed at building research partnerships between Native American and Western scientists, the NCAR|UCAR project has two supporting goals: broadening career paths for Native American students interested in Earth system science, and increasing the cultural sensitivity of Western scientists. Other partners in the project include the NCAR-based Rising Voices program, Haskell Indian Nations University, the University of Arizona's Biosphere 2, Michigan State University, and the GLOBE citizen science program conducted by the UCAR-based Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment."It's an exciting opportunity for both young indigenous scientists and scientists at NCAR and Biosphere 2," said Carolyn Brinkworth, NCAR director of Diversity, Education, and Outreach, and principal investigator of the project. "It's also a very different way of thinking about the science - truly integrating indigenous and traditional Western practices to benefit all of our partners."For example, she noted, indigenous communities can contribute important information about climate change by bringing generations of knowledge and experience with resource management and environmental and ecological processes.Students attending the Rising Voices workshop in Waimea, Hawaii, in 2016, visited a food garden planted according to traditional Hawaiian techniques to learn about climate change and phenology – the study of the seasonality of plants and animals. (Photo courtesy Craig Elevitch.)The pilot project is one of 37 awarded nationwide as part of a new NSF program called INCLUDES (Inclusion across the Nation of Communities of Learners of Underrepresented Discoverers in Engineering and Science). The program aspires to make careers in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) more accessible to underserved populations.Two students from tribal colleges and universities will be selected to become interns in UCAR's SOARS program (Significant Opportunities in Atmospheric Research and Science). The students will join research teams comprised of mentors from NCAR, Biosphere 2, and their home communities to co-develop their research projects.One of the project partners, the four-year-old Rising Voices program, has brought social and physical scientists and engineers together with Native American community members to build bonds that lead to research collaboration."The INCLUDES project will actualize many topics we've been talking about in Rising Voices," said Heather Lazrus, an NCAR environmental anthropologist and Rising Voices co-founder. "The project will create a pathway for the students to become engaged in atmospheric sciences at a young age through a citizen science component, and then help keep them engaged for the long haul.”The GLOBE citizen science component will help the SOARS students reach out to their communities through a number of activities, especially with middle- and high-school students. The project also will connect community youth with undergraduate programs at Haskell and the University of Arizona.As it does for all its interns, SOARS will provide multiple mentors to help the Native American students develop their research, computer modeling, scientific communication, and professional skills.SOARS Director Rebecca Haacker said the internship program has brought in students from Haskell before. “But this will enable us to expand our relationship with indigenous students, and it's nice to see the student internships being part of this larger effort.”The mentors will be supported with cultural training by Michigan State University professor Kyle Powys Whyte, who is also a member of Rising Voices. "We don't want a situation of Western scientists working with Native Americans without any preparation," Brinkworth said. "We want the Western scientists to be introduced to the students' culture, their ways of thinking, their ways of working."The plan is for two SOARS interns to be selected by early 2017 and participate in research projects over the summer. In a second phase, NSF plans to bring together all the pilot projects two years from now with the goal of building out a comprehensive “Alliance” program.Brinkworth said that when she saw the request for proposals, she thought NCAR was uniquely positioned, in part because of Rising Voices, which has strengthened relationships among participating scientists and Native American communities.She hopes the new pilot project and the lessons to be learned will become a template for other efforts. "We are trying to produce a model for other Western scientific organizations that want to partner with indigenous scientists and communities," she said.Writer/contactJeff Smith, Science Writer and Public Information Officer 

UCAR hosts 6th annual veterans job fair Nov. 18

BOULDER, Colo. — Veterans, people with disabilities, and the public can meet with more than 30 Front Range employers at a job fair hosted by the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research on Friday, Nov. 18, on UCAR's Center Green campus, 3080 Center Green Drive, in north Boulder.Now in its sixth year, the annual event is co-sponsored by UCAR, Workforce Boulder County, and the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation of the Colorado Department of Labor and Employment. Starting at 10 a.m., the first hour is dedicated to veterans and people with disabilities, after which the general public is also invited to participate, starting at 11 a.m. until the fair ends at 2 p.m.Participants in a previous job fair at UCAR in discussion near the University of Colorado booth.  More than 30 employers from the Colorado Front Range will be participating in the 2016 event for veterans, people with disabilities, and the general public. (©UCAR. Photo by Carlye Calvin. This image is freely available for media & nonprofit use.)"It's gratifying to have so many great employers from so many industries — more this year than ever," said Randy Schalhamer, UCAR's talent acquisition manager. "The job fair exemplifies UCAR's commitment to assisting veterans and people with disabilities."DetailsWhat2016 Job Fair for Veterans & People with Disabilities WhenFriday, Nov. 18, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. (general public welcome from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.)WhereUCAR Center Green Campus (Bldg 1), 3080 Center Green Drive, Boulder, 80301What to bringRésumésAccessabilityUCAR's Center Green Campus is wheelchair accessible.To request a reasonable accommodation, please contact Randy Schalhamer, 303-497-8703, rschalha@ucar.edu, by Friday, November 11.Participating EmployersThese Colorado companies will be recruiting for more than 700 current and upcoming job openings at this year's job fair: Ball Aerospace; Ball Corporation; Boulder Valley School District; BT; Catamount Constructors, Inc.; CBOPC Veterans Affairs; Children's Hospital Colorado
; City of Longmont; Denver Water; Dr Pepper Snapple Group; EchoStar Corporation; Enterprise Holdings; First National Bank; FirstBank; GE Lighting & GE Power; HUB International; HS Markit; Jeppesen; McLane Western; Platte River Power Authority; Shamrock Foods Company; Swingle Lawn, Tree and Landscape Care; UCAR Event Services
; Verizon Wireless; West Safety Services; 
Western States Fire Protection;  Winter Park Resort; Workforce Boulder County; Xcel Energy; and additional employers.

UCAR Community Art Program Art Reception

The UCAR Community Art Program cordially invites you to an art reception for tactile artist Ann Cunningham and mixed media art by Nathan Abels and Arapahoe Community College students. The reception is Saturday November 12th from 12:00 to 3:00 pm in the NCAR Mesa Lab cafeteria 1850 Table Mesa Dr. Boulder, CO. Small appetizers and non-alcohol drinks will be served. Come meet the artists and be inspired by their beautiful artwork! Hope to see you there!

Thank you!

UCAR Drupal Users Group (UDUG) Meeting - October 2016

Are you interested in adding a UCAR/NCAR staff only role to your Drupal site?  If so, then come to the October UDUG meeting for a demo of the UCARAuth Role Drupal module, created by Stephen Geinosky.  Stephen will be:

  • Looking for user acceptance of the module
  • Looking for discussion/questions regarding the code and coding structure

Following Stephen's demo we will engage in an open Lean Coffee discussion of other Drupal related topics, questions and ideas.

Raising the visibility of women in IT

October 17, 2016 | To provide a boost to women working in information technology, the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR) is helping to bring together a team of women who will help build and operate a high-capacity network at a major supercomputing conference.The Women in IT Networking at SC program, or WINS, is a collaboration among UCAR, the U.S. Department of Energy’s Energy Sciences Network, and the Pennsylvania-based Keystone Initiative for Network Based Education and Research. Following a national competition, WINS selected seven women who work in IT departments at universities and national labs around the country to help build and operate SCinet, the very high capacity network at the SC16 international supercomputing conference in Salt Lake City next month.For the second year in a row, UCAR will help bring together a team of women to provide technical support at SC, a leading supercomputing conference. UCAR's Marla Meehl (left) and ESnet's Jason Zuraski (second from left) are pictured at last year's conference, meeting with WINS team members. (Photo by Marijke Unger, NCAR.)"This provides the women with great exposure to the latest in technology, working with some of the top engineers who are out there," said Marla Meehl, manager of the Network Engineering and Telecommunications Section for UCAR and NCAR, the National Center for Atmospheric Research. "It's an opportunity to learn and have exposure to things that they don't work with every day."Women are increasingly underrepresented in technological fields. A report last year by the American Association of University Women found that the number of U.S. women working in the computing and mathematical professions dropped from 35% in 1990 to just 26% in 2013.Meehl worked with several other IT experts to launch WINS last year and expand the number of women among the volunteers who design and deliver SCinet. Planning begins more than a year in advance and culminates in a high-intensity, around-the-clock installation in the days leading up to the conference."I’m grateful to be one of the WINS grant awardees and participate in SCinet," said Angie Asmus, IT security analyst at Colorado State University. "Because of WINS, I will be able to be mentored by and work with some of the brightest minds in IT. This is an amazing opportunity for me to gain hands-on experience and build important relationships that will be valuable to me as I progress in my career."Other participants are Denise Grayson, Sandia National Laboratories; Julie Locke, Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kali McLennan, University of Oklahoma: Amber Rasche, North Dakota State University; Jessica Shaffer, Georgia Institute of Technology; Julia Staats, CENIC; and, with separate funding, Indira Kassymkhanova of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.The WINS participants were chosen from 28 eligible applicants—a big jump from the 19 applications received the previous year. The selection team weighed a variety of factors, looking for applicants who had experience in networking; whose skillset matched their area of interest; whose participation was supported by their institution; and who added to the group’s diversity, whether geographically, institutionally or otherwise.The WINS awardee selection team, led by Wendy Huntoon of the Keystone Initiative, included Susan Lucas from ESnet, Linda Winkler from Argonne National Labs, Dave Jent from Indiana University, and Florence Hudson from Internet2.Meehl was able to secure funding from the National Science Foundation for participants from research and education organizations. The Department of Energy is supporting the women from its national laboratories.“Although there are more jobs in IT, there’s a massive shortage of workers, especially in the number of women in the field,” Meehl said. “It was really fulfilling this year to see a huge jump in the number of really qualified applicants. It was very hard to choose.”Writer/editor:David Hosansky, Manager of Media Relations

UCAR president to be inducted into National Academy of Engineering

BOULDER, Colo. — Antonio "Tony" J. Busalacchi, president of the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR), will be inducted next week into the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) during a ceremony in Washington, D.C.Election to the NAE honors those who have made outstanding contributions to engineering research, practice, or education. It is among the highest professional distinctions accorded to an engineer and those working at the intersection of science and engineering.Busalacchi was elected for his contributions to "understanding of tropical oceans in coupled climate systems via remotely sensed observations and for international leadership of climate prediction/projection research."UCAR President Antonio J. Busalacchi has been elected to the National Academy of Engineering. Click here for a higher-resolution image. (©UCAR. Photo by Carlye Calvin. This image is freely available for media & nonprofit use.)"I am deeply honored to be elected to this distinguished group," Busalacchi said. "As a nation we face a number of challenges in sustaining our ability to observe and predict weather, water, and climate. Despite such challenges, I am very optimistic about what the future holds at UCAR for our ability to predict the coupled Earth system to the ultimate betterment of society."UCAR is a consortium of more than 100 North American member colleges and universities focused on research and training in the atmospheric and related Earth system sciences.Busalacchi joined UCAR as president in August. He was previously the director of the Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center at the University of Maryland. Busalacchi is also a fellow of the American Meteorological Society (2005), the American Geophysical Union (2009), and the American Association for the Advancement of Science (2011)."The leadership and vision that Tony has brought to the Earth system science community — recognized by his numerous awards, including this induction into the distinguished National Academy of Engineering — are a tremendous asset to UCAR," said Eric Betterton, Chair of the UCAR Board of Trustees and a distinguished professor at the University of Arizona. "We are thrilled that Tony agreed to join UCAR and help set our direction as an interdisciplinary hub for researchers tackling some of the toughest scientific problems of our time."Busalacchi is one of 80 U.S. members and 22 foreign members who will be inducted into the NAE during its annual meeting on Oct. 9. He joins other past inductees from UCAR or the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), which is managed by UCAR on behalf of the National Science Foundation. Those academy members include C. Gordon Little (1974), Robert Serafin (1994), Margaret LeMone (1997), Robert Dickinson (2002), Warren Washington (2002), and Timothy Killeen (2007).The mission of NAE is to advance the well-being of the nation by promoting a vibrant engineering profession and by marshaling the expertise and insights of eminent engineers to provide independent advice to the federal government on matters involving engineering and technology. The NAE is part of The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.

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