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2011 holiday party blends awards and memories


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Five new trustees join UCAR's board

BOULDER — Five new trustees are taking their seats this week on the board of the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR), which manages the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR).The five new trustees are: Susan Avery, president emerita of Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution; Raymond Ban, managing director of Ban & Associates; Shuyi Chen, professor of meteorology and physical oceanography at the University of Miami; Sherri Goodman, senior fellow at the Woodrow Wilson International Center; and Harlan Spence, director of the University of New Hampshire's Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans, and Space. Each was elected by UCAR’s 110 member universities to a three-year term.The board, which determines UCAR's overall direction, elected a new chair: Everette Joseph, director of the Atmospheric Sciences Research Center at the University at Albany-SUNY. Joseph is serving his second three-year term as a trustee.At this week's meeting, UCAR President Antonio J. Busalacchi and Joseph thanked outgoing Chair of the Board Eric Betterton for his outstanding leadership, dedication, and commitment to UCAR."Eric is a tough act to follow, but I am looking forward to working with the new and returning trustees to ensure that UCAR continues to be regarded as one of the world's leading resources in the atmospheric and related Earth system sciences," Joseph said.Betterton, who has served as chair since 2015, said he was delighted to see Joseph assume the role. "Everette is exceptionally well placed to take over as chair, having served as vice chair since 2015. He has a deep understanding of UCAR, most recently evidenced by his leadership last spring of the successful search for a new UCAR president," Betterton said.Petra Klein from the University of Oklahoma will assume the vice chair role. She has served as a trustee since 2015.The UCAR member universities also re-elected two sitting trustees to additional terms: Betterton, also director of the University of Arizona's Department of Hydrology and Atmospheric Sciences; and Romy Olaisen, a vice president of enterprise ground solutions at Harris Corp. Eleven board members have continuing terms in a staggered-term system that assures continuity."I am excited to work with a board that has the depth of expertise from academia, government, and the private sector needed to help tackle the complex challenges facing Earth system science," Busalacchi said. "The work of NCAR, the UCAR university consortium, and our many partners working on weather, water, and climate has never been more important for protecting lives and property, growing the economy, and advancing national security."UCAR is a nonprofit consortium of 110 North American colleges and universities focused on research and training in the atmospheric and related Earth system sciences. UCAR manages the National Center for Atmospheric Research with sponsorship by the National Science Foundation. UCAR's community programs offer a suite of innovative resources, tools, and services in support of the consortium's education and research goals.New UCAR chairEverette Joseph has been the director of the University at Albany-SUNY's Atmospheric Sciences Research Center since 2014. His current projects include research to improve extreme weather resiliency and the development and deployment of ground-based and satellite observing systems. In his prior position as director of the Howard University Program in Atmospheric Sciences, he helped Howard become a national leader in graduating African American and Hispanic Ph.D.s in atmospheric science. Read more about Joseph.  New UCAR trustees Susan Avery is an atmospheric physicist and president emerita of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, where she served as president from 2008–2015. Prior to that, Avery was a professor at the University of Colorado and held various leadership positions, including director of the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES). Avery also is a past president of the American Meteorological Society and a past chair of the UCAR Board of Trustees. Read more about Avery.  Raymond Ban is managing director of Ban & Associates, which provides consulting services to weather media companies. He also serves as a consultant to The Weather Channel, where he served as an executive vice president from 2002–2009. Read more about Ban.  Shuyi Chen is a professor at the Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science at the University of Miami. She has also been an affiliate scientist at NCAR since 2006. She serves as vice chair of the National Academies Board of Atmospheric Science and Climate (BASC). A fellow of the American Meteorological Society, Chen is an expert in the prediction of extreme weather events, including tropical cyclones and winter storms. Read more about Chen. Sherri Goodman is a senior fellow at the Woodrow Wilson International Center, affiliated with the center's Polar Initiative, Environmental Change and Security Program, and Global Women's Leadership Initiative. She is also a senior fellow at CNA, a nonprofit research and analysis organization, where she founded the CNA Military Advisory Board. Goodman is the former president and CEO of the Consortium for Ocean Leadership and former Deputy Undersecretary of Defense (Environmental Security). Read more about Goodman. Harlan Spence has been director of the University of New Hampshire's Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans, and Space since 2010. Prior to that, he was a professor of astronomy and department chair at Boston University. With expertise in solar research and the origins of space weather, he has worked closely with NCAR's High Altitude Observatory. He serves on several national committees providing advice to NASA and the National Science Foundation on potential space missions. Read more about Spence. 

UCAR letter on immigration order

Dear UCAR Community,As many of you are aware, President Donald Trump signed an executive order on Friday temporarily banning citizens of seven countries -- Iraq, Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, and Yemen -- from entering the United States. This ban is counter to our organization’s mission and values, and I would like to reaffirm, in the strongest possible terms, our commitment and support for members of our community who may be impacted by this executive order.UCAR and NCAR are devoted to hiring, working with, and welcoming the best employees and visiting staff in the world, regardless of their country of citizenship, religion, or personal characteristics. We understand that diverse perspectives are critical for finding solutions to the complex scientific problems we are tackling today. Further, the impact of our research is global in scale, stretching beyond the boundary of our own country and it is imperative that we are able to collaborate with our colleagues around the world.While it is not yet clear how this executive order -- parts of which have been stayed by multiple federal judges -- will be implemented, UCAR is carefully monitoring the possible impacts on our staff and community members. Among these impacts will surely be an emotional toll, and I would ask that all of us at UCAR’s 110 member institutions and beyond work to support each other during this difficult and uncertain time.Sincerely,Antonio Busalacchi, UCAR President

Top stories of 2016

Zika risk estimated for U.S. citiesA multidisciplinary team of scientists studied the possible timing and location of Zika virus risk in the United States. A powerful new supercomputerThe new system for the NCAR-Wyoming Supercomputing Center is capable of more than 2.5 times the amount of scientific computing performed by its predecessor. SOARS turns 20The SOARS Program has been boosting diversity in Earth system science for two decades.Extreme downpours could quintuple At century's end, the number of summertime storms that produce extreme downpours could increase by more than 400 percent across parts of the United States.New NCAR climate exhibitThe exhibits at NCAR's Mesa Lab in Boulder provide the public with an engaging and scientifically accurate forum to learn about climate. Solar model pulls order out of chaosPushing a solar model to the highest resolution ever attempted brings order back to the Sun's magnetic tangle.Investigating air quality in KoreaNCAR scientists traveled to South Korea as part of a field campaign to investigate the region's air quality.U.S. water forecasts tap NCAR modelNOAA is using an advanced NCAR prediction system as the core of the new National Water Model.UCAR partners with AmazonUnidata has partnered with Amazon Web Services to make NEXRAD data from NOAA available in the cloud in near real time. Flights investigate Southern Ocean  The ORCAS field campaign is helping scientists better understand just how much carbon dioxide the icy waters are able to lock away.  Ocean temps predict U.S. heat wavesThe formation of a distinct pattern of sea surface temperatures in the Pacific Ocean can predict an increased chance of summertime heat waves up to 50 days in advance.3D-printed weather stations Scientists successfully installed the first wave of low-cost weather stations in Zambia with 3D-printed parts. Visualization of the year  Researchers at NCAR and the University of Miami are seeking clues about what really goes on inside a tornado using highly detailed computer simulations of wind fields.

Congress unanimously passes law for research and innovation

BOULDER, Colo. — By voting unanimously this month to pass the American Innovation and Competitiveness Act, Congress has strengthened U.S. science and provided a major boost to the nation's economy and national security."Scientific research is the critical foundation of economic competitiveness," said Antonio J. Busalacchi, president of the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR). "This bipartisan legislation will propel advances in research and strengthen collaborations between scientists and private industry, creating jobs and providing far-ranging benefits for the nation in the years to come."UCAR President Antonio J. Busalacchi. (©UCAR. Photo by Carlye Calvin. This image is freely available for media & nonprofit use.)Busalacchi noted that federal investments in atmospheric research alone have spawned a multibillion private weather industry, providing critical forecasts to business leaders and local officials and helping to save lives from tornadoes, floods, and other disasters.The American Innovation and Competitiveness Act, which maximizes opportunities for basic research, won unanimous passage last week in the House and Senate. It was sponsored by Senators Cory Gardner (R-Colorado) and Gary Peters (D-Michigan), along with John Thune (R-South Dakota) and Bill Nelson (D-Florida).The bill encourages scientific entrepreneurship; provides incentives for private sector innovation; promotes improvements in manufacturing; strengthens national security; and promotes diversity in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) fields. It most directly focuses on programs in the National Science Foundation (NSF), National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), and the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy.Key provisions include:Maximizing basic researchMerit review: Reaffirms the appropriateness of NSF intellectual merit and broader impacts criteria used to evaluate grant proposals.EPSCoR: Updates NSF’s Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR) to continue promoting groundbreaking research in states that receive relatively little federal research money.Leveraging the private sectorIncentivizes private-sector innovation: Updates prize competition authority to encourage greater participation in federal prize competitions.Expands opportunities for public involvement: Permits federal science agencies to use crowdsourcing as a tool to conduct agency projects.Improving manufacturingEncourages improved manufacturing: Adjusts the federal cost-share ratio and implements new accountability and oversight provisions within NIST’s Hollings Manufacturing Extension Partnership (MEP) program.Promoting innovation and technology transferBolsters scientific entrepreneurship: Authorizes the successful I-Corps program to help scientists move their research from the laboratory to the marketplace.Reaffirms importance of commercialization: Directs NSF to continue awarding translational research grants and strengthen public-private cooperation.Supporting STEMScientific community input: Establishes a STEM Advisory Panel composed of academic and industry representatives to provide recommendations on federal STEM programs.Diversity in STEM fields: Creates a working group to study ways to improve inclusion of women and underrepresented individuals in STEM fields.The legislation also includes provisions to strengthen national security and foster more communication between science and national security agencies. It reduces paperwork burdens and promotes transparency by requiring public notices of grants to justify the project's expenditures and confirm that they align with NSF priorities."Congress's unanimous support of scientific research and innovation is an important step for securing our nation's future, " Busalacchi said. "At UCAR we look forward to working with NSF and other federal agencies, the research community, and the private sector to advance research in support of society."Full text: American Innovation and Competitiveness Act 

NCAR & UCAR Scientists Highlight Advances in Weather, Water & Climate Research at AGU 2016

SAN FRANCISCO – Scientists with the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) and the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR) will make dozens of presentations at the fall meeting of the American Geophysical Union (AGU) during the week of December 12–16.Media Q&AThe Path Forward from Paris, One Year LaterUCAR President Antonio J. Busalacchi, AGU President Margaret Leinen (Scripps Institution of Oceanography), and Carlos Nobre (Brazilian National Institute of Science & Technology for Climate Change) - related to Union Session U23ATuesday, December 13, 4 p.m. - Moscone West 3000 (Press Conference Room)Note: The Moscone West Q&A follows Union Session U23A with these participants in Moscone North Hall E from 1:40-3:40 p.m.Selected Talks MONDAY | TUESDAY | WEDNESDAY | THURSDAY | FRIDAYFull calendar, special events& exhibitsNCAR & UCAR at AGU 2016>@AtmosNewsLive | #NCARscience MONDAY, December 12Getting Space Weather Data and More From 'Noise' in GPS Signals: The COSMIC MissionsWilliam Schreiner, UCARSA11A-04: Satellite Constellations for Space Weather and Ionospheric Studies: Overview of the COSMIC and COSMIC-2 Missions8:45-9:00 a.m., Moscone West 2016Climate Change, Lyme, Zika, and Other Vector-Borne DiseasesAndrew Monaghan, NCARGC12A-02: Assessment of Climate Change and Vector-Borne Diseases in the United States10:35-10:50 a.m., Moscone West 2020Extreme Rainfall Could Increase Fivefold Across Parts of the U.S. Later This CenturyAndreas Prein, NCARGC13H-04: The Future Intensification of Hourly Precipitation Extremes2:25-2:40 p.m., Moscone West 3003Building Resilient Cities and Ecosystems: Food, Energy, and Water SecurityPatricia Romero-Lankao, NCARU13A-05: Urbanization, Extreme Climate Hazards, and Food/Energy/Water Security2:54-3:12 p.m., Moscone West 2022/2024TUESDAY, December 13Carbon Dioxide's Opposite Effects in the Upper AtmosphereStan Solomon, NCARSA21C-03: Climate Change in the Upper Atmosphere8:30-8:45 a.m., Moscone West 20163D-Printed Weather Stations Aid Forecasting in Developing NationsPaul Kucera, NCARH23F-1637: Development of Innovative Technology to Expand Precipitation Observations in Satellite Precipitation Validation in Under-developed Data-Sparse Regions1:40-6:00 p.m., Moscone South - Poster HallScenarios for Reaching the Paris Agreement TargetsBen Sanderson, NCARGC24D-02: Pathways to 1.5 Degrees: New GCM Simulations for Scenarios Which Meet the Paris Temperature Targets4:15-4:27 p.m., Moscone West 3003WEDNESDAY, December 14Seeing Into Tornadoes and Hurricanes with High-Resolution SimulationsGeorge Bryan, NCARIN31F-07: Insights into Tornadoes, Hurricanes from High-Resolution Simulations9:30-9:45 a.m., Moscone West 2000A Weather Resiliency Toolbox for Communities and BusinessesJames Done, NCARPA32A-03: Tools in Support of Planning for Weather and Climate Extremes10:58-11:11 a.m., Moscone South 304Exploring Unanswered Questions in the Evolution of Prehistoric Climate - The Emiliani LectureBette Otto-Bliesner, NCARPP32A-01: Resolving Some Puzzles of Climate Evolution Since the Last Glacial Maximum: A Melding of Paleoclimate Modeling and Data11:20 a.m.-12:20 p.m., Moscone West 2022/2024THURSDAY, December 15Novel Uses of Climate Information for Water Utility Planners David Yates, NCAR U42A-02: The Novel Use of Climate Information in Water Utility Planning 10:40-10:58 a.m., Moscone South 102What's In Wildfire Smoke? Jerome Barre, NCAR A42D-04: Quantifying Fire Emissions and Associated Aerosol Species Using Assimilation of Satellite Carbon Monoxide Retrievals 11:05-11:20 a.m., Moscone West 3004 <FRIDAY, December 16What's Causing Errors in Hurricane & Tropical Storm Forecasts? Chris Davis, NCAR A54F-06: On the Origin of Large Tropical Cyclone Track Errors 5:15-5:30 p.m., Moscone West 3012  Full calendar, special events & exhibit infoNCAR & UCAR at AGU 2016>@AtmosNewsLive | #NCARscience | #AGU16

UCAR Community Art Program Art Reception -- Dec. 10

The UCAR Community Art Program cordially invites you to an art reception for oil painter Olga Karpeisky and acrylic and mixed media painter Joan Jordan. The reception is Saturday December 10th from 4:00 to 7:00 pm in the NCAR Mesa Lab cafeteria 1850 Table Mesa Dr. Boulder, CO. Small appetizers and non-alcohol drinks will be served. Come meet the artists and be inspired by their beautiful artwork! Hope to see you there!

Happy Holiday's and Warmest Wishes for the New Year!

Thank you!

Audrey Lewis

 

UCAR breakfast honors AGU Fellows

December 19, 2016 | UCAR cemented a new tradition at the fall conference of the American Geophysical Union in San Francisco last week by hosting its second annual AGU Fellows breakfast. The event honors newly elected Fellows from NCAR and UCAR member universities as well as those elected in the past."I am delighted to recognize and congratulate you on your exceptional scientific contributions and the recognition of your standing in the Earth and space sciences," UCAR President Antonio Busalacchi told the Fellows.Only one in 1,000 AGU members are elected Fellows in any given year. About 40 percent of this year's Fellows are from NCAR and the 110 member colleges and universities of UCAR.Inez Fung and Antonio Busalacchi (©UCAR. Photo by David Hosansky. This image is freely available for media & nonprofit use.)Inez Fung, professor of atmospheric science at the University of California, Berkeley, and an AGU Fellow, delivered the keynote address at the breakfast. Fung was appointed by President Obama to the National Science Board in 2012, and she focused her remarks on the board.The National Science Board, which includes the director of the National Science Foundation (NSF) and establishes the policies of the agency, is apolitical and independent. Fung explained that, in addition to providing the president and Congress with major reports about research in the United States, the board's 25 members are putting more emphasis on building strong relationships with members of Congress."Because we represent a wide area of expertise, are spread across the country, and serve on the board for six-year terms, we are well positioned to invest in building professional relationships on Capitol Hill," Fung said. "Our focus has been on relevant congressional committee chairs as well as our own congressional delegations. We have found these meetings very worthwhile and are continuing to cultivate congressional relationships."Fung also spoke about a personal highlight of her board membership: her trip to Antarctica three years ago. Board members are invited to visit Antarctica because of the importance of the U.S. Antarctic Program, which is funded and managed by NSF."I came away from that trip totally in awe of Antarctica—of the scientists working there to understand the geology, atmosphere, ocean, ice and biology of the place and of the men and women who make the science happen in such a faraway and challenging environment," she said.During a question-and-answer session following her remarks, Fung emphasized the importance of basic research for the United States, as well as Congress's support for research."Basic science is the engine of the economy; it is the engine of innovation," she said.  "This is very important for American leadership in the world."Writer/contact:David Hosansky, Manager of Media Relations

UCAR publishes guidance to next presidential administration and Congress

BOULDER, Colo. — The University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR) has published guidance for the next U.S. presidential administration and Congress on the importance of better understanding and predicting weather, water, climate, and other aspects of the Earth system.A UCAR white paper emphasizes that focused investment of federal resources in the atmospheric, Earth, and related sciences will make significant contributions addressing important societal needs. These include protection of lives and property, expansion of new economic opportunities, enhancement of national security, and strengthening U.S. leadership in research and development."More than ever, federal support of research and education into the Earth system is critical to the nation," said UCAR President Antonio J. Busalacchi. "We are on the verge of a new era of prediction, based on understanding how the entire Earth system works. This will have a direct positive impact on lives and livelihoods."UCAR is a nonprofit consortium of 110 member colleges and universities.The white paper proposes federal support for advancing computer models, new observing systems, and more powerful computing resources, as well as a strong science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education system. Its proposals include a National Academies' decadal survey, involving representatives of the public and private sectors, which would develop priorities for weather research and forecasting."The United States should be the unambiguous leader in predicting weather, water, climate, and related systems," Busalacchi said. "Transforming this knowledge into action will allow our nation and the world to effectively respond and adapt to changing environmental conditions."UCAR federal government transition resources can be found here. 

UCAR/NCAR statement on the passing of Ralph J. Cicerone

Ralph Cicerone pictured at NCAR in the 1980s. (©UCAR. Photo by Ginger Hein. This image is freely available for media & nonprofit use.)The National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) and the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR) join colleagues in the Earth system science community and beyond in mourning the loss of renowned atmospheric scientist Ralph J. Cicerone, who died on Nov. 5.Dr. Cicerone left his job as a research chemist at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography in 1980 to join NCAR, where he led the Atmospheric Chemistry Division. In 1989, Dr. Cicerone took on a new challenge, accepting an offer to build an interdisciplinary department of geosciences at the University of California, Irvine.  "Ralph was a pioneer in thinking about the Earth as a connected system," said UCAR President Antonio J. Busalacchi. "His willingness to work across disciplines in pursuit of a deeper understanding of how the pieces of the Earth system fit together set an example for atmospheric scientists and helped set the research direction for our community as well as the whole of the National Academy of Sciences. His loss will be deeply felt at NCAR, UCAR, and far beyond."Read Dr. Cicerone's full obituary at the National Academy of Sciences webpage. 

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