UCAR

2011 holiday party blends awards and memories


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2017 award winners honored at holiday party

December 12, 2017 | Staff and family members gathered at Center Green 1 on Friday, December 8, to celebrate the year's accomplishments and connect with colleagues from across the organization. 

UCAR Community Art Program Art Reception

The UCAR Community Art Program cordially invites you to an art reception for two new exhibits. Gallery l features Gary Molzan, oil & soft pastel painter. Gallery ll features Mark Zirinsky, aluminum sculptor. The reception is Saturday December 2nd from 5-8 pm. Light refreshments will be served. The event will be held in the Mesa Lab cafeteria, 1850 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, CO. Come meet the artists and be inspired by their beautiful artwork. Hope to see you there!

Thank you

Outstanding accomplishment awards - 2017 nominees

November 27, 2017 | Winners will be announced on December 8 at the 2017 Outstanding Accomplishment Awards and Holiday Celebration in the Center Green auditorium.

UCAR names inaugural Next Generation Fellows

BOULDER, Colo. — The University Corporation for Atmospheric Research has announced winners of the inaugural UCAR Next Generation Fellowships. The first cohort of three graduate students was selected from a highly competitive field. The fellowships are intended for graduate students from underrepresented communities who hold an undergraduate degree in atmospheric or related Earth system science and are attending a North American university for graduate work. Successful candidates receive financial support for two years of graduate school and two summer internships.The program offers three distinct tracks: Earth system science, diversity and inclusion in the Earth system sciences, and public policy."I am excited to welcome this talented inaugural cohort," said Antonio Busalacchi, UCAR president. "We created the Next Generation Fellowships because we recognize the value and importance of fostering greater diversity in Earth system science. I look forward to the mutual benefits that interaction with our new fellows will bring and welcome them to the UCAR community."The 2017 UCAR Next Generation Fellows(*indicates a UCAR Member Institution)Tania Lopez - Earth System Science FellowCarnegie Mellon UniversityUCAR Fellow Tania Lopez At Carnegie Mellon University, Tania Lopez is studying civil and environmental engineering as a first-year Ph.D. student. Her examination of engineering design standards and of changes in observed extreme precipitation are the first phases in her research on the impact of climate change on precipitation patterns for stormwater infrastructure design decisions, performance, and resilience. Lopez is interested in developing more expertise in computational and statistical tools for analyzing precipitation data and understanding changes in current and projected future patterns. These interests will bring her to Boulder to strengthen collaboration with NCAR scientists during her summer internships in 2018 and 2019.Lopez received a B.S. in engineering physics from Mexico's Monterrey Institute of Technology and Higher Education (ITESM). She credits her family’s encouragement for her persistence pursuing and achieving her goals. "Despite the difficulties I came across pursuing higher education, I was not discouraged," she said. "My desire grew stronger and I could envision a clearer goal." That included a master’s in civil and environmental engineering at Carnegie Mellon, which she earned on the way to her current doctoral studies. "I have always felt passionate about my field, my decisions, and speaking up for minority inclusion," she said. Lopez sums up her career ambitions this way: "to serve as an effective intermediary between climate science and decision making concerned with engineered systems, where human needs and climate interact."Aara’L Yarber - Diversity and Inclusion FellowPennsylvania State University*UCAR Fellow Aara'L Yarber First-year doctoral student Aara’L Yarber is in the meteorology program at Pennsylvania State University. She is studying atmospheric and climate dynamics and their societal impacts, with particular interest in Africa and the Caribbean. Yarber is planning research using WRF, the Weather Research and Forecasting model, along with its dust module, with the goals of developing an observation network in West Africa and of improving understanding of dust transport and its linkage to respiratory disease. She will continue focusing on her dual interests in environmental science and environmental justice during her 2018 and 2019 summer internships in Boulder with the UCAR Office of Diversity and Inclusion.Yarber began her undergraduate studies at Howard University* with a focus on physics and astronomy. With several undergraduate courses in weather and climate under her belt, she then participated in an atmospheric field campaign in Sal, Cape Verde. It was the summer before her senior year, and during the campaign she "became fascinated with weather, climate, and air quality, and the effects of these phenomena on underrepresented groups." In pursuit of atmospheric science, she hopes "to contribute not only to scientific advancement but also positively influence social and environmental change." Her career goals include advocating for diversity in atmospheric science "not only for the sole purpose of scientific advancement but to provide voices for communities that have long faced environmental inequity."Linh Anh Cat - Public Policy FellowUniversity of California, Irvine*UCAR Fellow Linh Anh CatLinh Anh Cat is in the fourth year of the doctoral program in ecology at the University of California, Irvine. In addition to her dissertation work on patterns of fungal disease dispersal and climate change, she has written a science policy review linking that research to her public policy focus. The review examines valley fever, a fungal disease prevalent in the U.S. Southwest, and calls for binational cooperation with Mexico to study the negative impact of climate change on exposure. She will explore her policy interests during her summer 2018 and 2019 internships with UCAR’s Washington, D.C., office.For her undergraduate work at the University of Central Florida, Cat earned dual bachelor of science degrees in environmental studies (policy track) and in biology. She has contributed to an array of activities during her academic career that reflect her interest in working at the intersections of diversity, equity, inclusion, and science policy. In addition to her studies, these activities have ranged from organizing local science outreach events to serving on the American Association of University Women’s National Student Advisory Council to tackle women and minority representation in STEM. "My goal is to be a leader in science policy," Cat said. "I want to work on enacting innovative policies at the intersection between climate change, air quality, human health, and the disproportionate impact on women and minorities."

Investing in climate observations would generate major returns

November 14, 2017 | A major new paper by more than two dozen climate experts concludes that a well-designed climate observing system could deliver trillions of dollars in benefits while providing decision makers with the information they need in coming decades to protect public health and the economy."We are on the threshold of a new era in prediction, drawing on our knowledge of the entire Earth system to strengthen societal resilience to potential climate and weather disasters," said Antonio Busalacchi, president of the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research and one of the co-authors. "Strategic investments in observing technologies will pay for themselves many times over by protecting life and property, promoting economic growth, and providing needed intelligence to decision makers."Elizabeth Weatherhead, a scientist with the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences at the University of Colorado Boulder, is the lead author of the new paper, published last week in Earth's Future. The co-authors include two scientists associated with the National Center for Atmospheric Research: Jeffrey Lazo and Kevin Trenberth.The scientists urge that investments focus on tackling seven grand challenges. These include predicting extreme weather and climate shifts, the role of clouds and circulation in regulating climate, regional sea level change and coastal impacts, understanding the consequences of melting ice, and feedback loops involving carbon cycling.For more about the paper, see the CIRES news release.

UCAR Congressional Briefing: Moving research to industry

WASHINGTON — Federally funded scientific advances are enabling the multibillion-dollar weather industry to deliver increasingly targeted forecasts to consumers and businesses, strengthening the economy and providing the nation with greater resilience to natural disasters, experts said today at a congressional briefing.The panel of experts, representing universities, federally funded labs, and the private sector, said continued government investment in advanced computer modeling, observing tools, and other basic research provides the foundation for improved forecasts.The nonprofit University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR) sponsored the briefing."Thanks to a quiet revolution in modern weather prediction, we can all use forecasts to make decisions in ways that wouldn't have been possible just 10 years ago," said Rebecca Morss, a senior scientist with the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) and deputy director of the center's Mesoscale and Microscale Meteorology Lab. "Now we are looking to the next revolution, which includes giving people longer lead times and communicating risk as effectively as possible."Fuqing Zhang, a professor of meteorology and statistics at Pennsylvania State University, highlighted the ways that scientists are advancing their understanding of hurricanes and other storms with increasingly detailed observations and computer modeling. Researchers at Penn State, for example, fed data from the new National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration GOES-R satellite into NOAA's powerful FV3 model to generate an experimental forecast of Hurricane Harvey that simulated its track and intensity."The future of weather forecasting is very promising," said Zhang, who is also the director of the Penn State Center for Advanced Data Assimilation and Predictability Techniques.  "With strategic investments in observations, modeling, data assimilation, and supercomputing, we will see some remarkable achievements."Mary Glackin, director of science and forecast operations for The Weather Company, an IBM business, said the goal of the weather industry is to help consumers and businesses make better decisions, both by providing its own forecasts and by forwarding alerts from the National Weather Service. The Weather Company currently is adapting a powerful research weather model based at NCAR, the Model for Prediction Across Scales (MPAS), for use in worldwide, real-time forecasts.The NCAR-based Model for Prediction Across Scales simulates the entire globe while enabling scientists to zoom in on areas of interest. It is one of the key tools for improving forecasts in the future. (©UCAR. This image is freely available for media & nonprofit use.) "We have a weather and climate enterprise that we can be extremely proud of as a nation, but it's not where it should be," Glackin said. "Weather affects every consumer and business, and the public-private partnership can play a pivotal role in providing better weather information that is critically needed."Antonio Busalacchi, president of UCAR, emphasized the benefits of partnerships across the academic, public, and private sectors. He said that research investments by the National Science Foundation, NOAA, and other federal agencies are critical for improving forecasts that will better protect vulnerable communities and strengthen the economy."These essential collaborations between government agencies, universities, and private companies are driving landmark advances in weather forecasting," Busalacchi said. "The investments that taxpayers are making in basic research are paying off many times over by keeping our nation safer and more prosperous."The briefing was the latest in a series of UCAR Congressional Briefings that draw on expertise from UCAR's university consortium and public-private partnerships to provide insights into critical topics in the Earth system sciences. Past briefings have focused on wildfires, predicting space weather, aviation weather safety, the state of the Arctic, hurricane prediction, potential impacts of El Niño, and new advances in water forecasting.

Three new trustees join UCAR's board

BOULDER, Colo. — Three new trustees are joining the board of the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research.In addition, UCAR is welcoming seven new member universities. This brings the total membership for the nonprofit consortium to 117 universities and colleges across North America that focus on research and education in Earth system science.The three newly elected trustees are Alphonso Diaz, vice president of financial affairs and treasurer at Marymount University; Rana Fine, professor of ocean sciences at the Rosenstiel School of the University of Miami, and David Randall, university distinguished professor at Colorado State University.At the UCAR annual meeting, UCAR's members also reelected four sitting trustees on the 18-member board: Chris Bretherton, professor of atmospheric science and applied mathematics at the University of Washington; Petra Klein, professor of meteorology and associate dean in the College of Atmospheric and Geographic Science at the University of Oklahoma; Gudrun Magnusdottir, professor of Earth system science at the University of California, Irvine; and Charlette Geffen, chief science and technology officer for Earth and biological sciences at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory."Our new and returning trustees bring extensive experience and dedication, and I very much look forward to working with them to ensure that UCAR continues to be a world leader in the Earth system sciences," said Everette Joseph, chair of the UCAR Board of Trustees and director of the Atmospheric Sciences Research Center at the University at Albany-SUNY.The new member universities are University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa; Duke University; Louisiana State University; University of Maryland, Baltimore County; University of Massachusetts, Amherst; University of Massachusetts, Lowell; and University of Saskatchewan."It is an honor to welcome these great universities to UCAR," said UCAR President Antonio Busalacchi. "The work of university researchers and educators is more important than ever as they train the next-generation workforce and collaborate with partners in government and the private sector to advance our understanding of the Earth system for the betterment of society."

UCAR to host 7th annual job fair Nov. 2

BOULDER, Colo. — Veterans, people with disabilities, and the public can meet with 20 Front Range employers at a job fair hosted by the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research on Thursday, November 2, on UCAR's Center Green campus, 3080 Center Green Drive, in north Boulder.Participants in a previous UCAR job fair visit one of the employers' booths. (©UCAR. Photo by Carlye Calvin. This image is freely available for media & nonprofit use.)ERNow in its seventh year, the annual event is co-sponsored by UCAR, Workforce Boulder County, and the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation of the Colorado Department of Labor and Employment.The first hour of the job fair (10–11 a.m.) is dedicated to veterans and people with disabilities. The general public is then also welcome from 11 a.m. until the fair wraps up at 2 p.m."This is always one of my favorite events of the year," said Randy Schalhamer, UCAR's talent acquisition manager. "We are excited to have another great turnout from employers that share in UCAR’s commitment to assisting job seekers in the local community — especially veterans and people with disabilities.”DetailsWhat2017 Job Fair for Veterans & People with Disabilities WhenThursday, Nov. 2, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. (general public welcome from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.)WhereUCAR Center Green Campus (Bldg 1), 3080 Center Green Drive, Boulder 80301What to bringRésumés. (Free résumé reviews offered from 10 a.m. to noon) RegistrationRegistration for the job fair is optional and free; attendees are welcome to preregister at:http://bit.ly/ucarjobfair17AccessibilityUCAR's Center Green Campus is wheelchair accessible. To request a reasonable accommodation, please contact Macy Nedelka, 303-497-8723, by Monday, October 30. Participating Employers These Colorado companies will be recruiting for more than 700 current and upcoming job openings at this year's job fair:AeroTek, Allied Universal Security, Block Advisors/H&R Block, Boulder Valley School District, Catamount Constructors Inc., Children’s Hospital Colorado, Diversified Personnel LLC, FBI, First National Bank, FirstBank, Hilton, HUB International, Jeppesen, Level 3 Communications, McLane Western, Prescient, UCAR|NCAR, Wells Fargo, Winter Park Resort, and Xcel Energy 

UCAR statement on nomination of Barry Myers to head NOAA

BOULDER, Colo. — The University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR) congratulates Barry Myers on his nomination as administrator of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).Myers is CEO of AccuWeather and a leader of the American weather industry. He lent important support for the Weather Research and Forecasting Innovation Act of 2017, which emphasizes subseasonal to seasonal weather prediction — a priority for business and community leaders who need more reliable forecasts of weather patterns weeks to months in advance.His nomination, announced today by the White House, comes at a critical time as the United States works to strengthen its resilience to severe weather events and regain global leadership in the field of weather prediction."From my years of working with Barry, I know he appreciates the importance of re-establishing U.S. preeminence in weather prediction," said UCAR President Antonio Busalacchi. "I look forward to hearing Barry’s plans to improve weather forecasting through partnerships among government agencies, private companies, and the university community. As we have seen from the recent hurricanes, timely and accurate forecasts are critical for evacuating residents and protecting lives and property, as well as strengthening our economy and safeguarding national security.”In addition to running the National Weather Service, NOAA engages in weather and climate research and operates weather satellites and a national environmental data center. The agency also works to better understand and protect the nation's coasts, oceans, and fisheries.  

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