NCAR flight team receives Antarctic honors

October 19, 2016 | Four pilots and one instrumentation technician in NCAR's Earth Observing Laboratory recently received the Antarctica Service Medal from the National Science Foundation (NSF) for their research flights in that remote and challenging region. The recipients are based in EOL's Research Aviation Facility (RAF).

Soil moisture, snowpack data could help predict 'flash droughts'

BOULDER, Colo. — New research suggests that "flash droughts" — like the one that unexpectedly gripped the Southern Rockies and Midwest in the summer of 2012 — could be predicted months in advance using soil moisture and snowpack data. Researchers at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) analyzed the conditions leading up to the 2012 drought, which ultimately caused $30 billion in economic losses, looking for any warning signs that a drought was on the way. In a study funded by the National Science Foundation and published in the Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres, the scientists find that observations of snowmelt and soil moisture could have predicted the ensuing drought up to four months in advance."The 2012 drought over the Midwest was one of the most severe and extensive U.S. droughts since the 1930s Dust Bowl, but it was also extremely challenging to predict," said Debasish PaiMazumder, lead author of the study. "This study demonstrated the potential to improve seasonal drought outlooks in the future, giving farmers, water planners, and others more time to prepare."The official U.S. Drought Monitor issued on Aug. 21, 2012. The map shows the exceptionally severe drought across the middle of the country. Just three months before, drought forecasts failed to predict that a drought was on the way. Click to enlarge. (Image courtesy National Drought Mitigation Center.)Seasonal drought forecasts issued in May 2012 for the upcoming summer did not foresee a drought forming in the country's midsection. But by the end of August, a drought that had started in the Southern Rockies had spread across the Midwest, parching Oklahoma, Kansas, Nebraska, and Missouri.These flash droughts — which form and intensify rapidly — can catch forecasters off guard because they are not preceded by any large-scale climate patterns that could act as a warning signal. For example, one contributor to the recent California drought was a persistent high-pressure system parked off the west coast of Canada that deflected storms away from the state. Because forecasters could identify the high-pressure system, they could also accurately predict fewer storms and a worsening of the drought.Previous research has shown that looking at soil moisture alone could improve the lead-time of drought predictions by one to two months. PaiMazumder and NCAR colleague James Done were interested in whether they could extend this further by adding snowpack into the equation.“Advance knowledge of a drought even a month or two ahead of time can greatly minimize the effects on society,” said Anjuli Bamzai, program director in NSF’s Division of Atmospheric and Geospace Sciences, which funded the research.  “This study highlights the role of snowpack and soil moisture conditions in predicting the sudden onset of drought.”To explore the physical connections among snowpack, soil moisture, and drought, the researchers analyzed data collected between 1980-2012. To supplement those observations, they also explored the physical connections in a new NCAR-based community Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model dataset comprising 24 simulations of the period 1990-2000 and 2012. Because each simulation was run with small tweaks to the way the model represents atmospheric physics, the result was a broad look at different climate scenarios that could have plausibly unfolded during the study period."The model helped us get a handle on how robust the relationships between snowpack, soil moisture, and drought are," Done said. "The stronger the relationship, the better a predictor is."While observations of snowpack and soil moisture could have helped predict the 2012 drought, the method does not replace other drought prediction measures that identify large-scale phenomena that frequently lead to drought conditions."This is another ingredient that could be used when making seasonal drought forecasts," Done said. "But it's not the only ingredient, and for many droughts that are tied to large-scale precursors, it may not be the most important one." About the articleTitle: Potential Predictability Sources of the 2012 US Drought in Observations and a Regional Model EnsembleAuthors: Debasish PaiMazumder and James DoneJournal: Journal of Geophysical Research – Atmospheres, DOI: 10.1002/2016JD025322Writer:Laura Snider, Senior Science Writer and Public Information Officer   

Raising the visibility of women in IT

October 17, 2016 | To provide a boost to women working in information technology, the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR) is helping to bring together a team of women who will help build and operate a high-capacity network at a major supercomputing conference.The Women in IT Networking at SC program, or WINS, is a collaboration among UCAR, the U.S. Department of Energy’s Energy Sciences Network, and the Pennsylvania-based Keystone Initiative for Network Based Education and Research. Following a national competition, WINS selected seven women who work in IT departments at universities and national labs around the country to help build and operate SCinet, the very high capacity network at the SC16 international supercomputing conference in Salt Lake City next month.For the second year in a row, UCAR will help bring together a team of women to provide technical support at SC, a leading supercomputing conference. UCAR's Marla Meehl (left) and ESnet's Jason Zuraski (second from left) are pictured at last year's conference, meeting with WINS team members. (Photo by Marijke Unger, NCAR.)"This provides the women with great exposure to the latest in technology, working with some of the top engineers who are out there," said Marla Meehl, manager of the Network Engineering and Telecommunications Section for UCAR and NCAR, the National Center for Atmospheric Research. "It's an opportunity to learn and have exposure to things that they don't work with every day."Women are increasingly underrepresented in technological fields. A report last year by the American Association of University Women found that the number of U.S. women working in the computing and mathematical professions dropped from 35% in 1990 to just 26% in 2013.Meehl worked with several other IT experts to launch WINS last year and expand the number of women among the volunteers who design and deliver SCinet. Planning begins more than a year in advance and culminates in a high-intensity, around-the-clock installation in the days leading up to the conference."I’m grateful to be one of the WINS grant awardees and participate in SCinet," said Angie Asmus, IT security analyst at Colorado State University. "Because of WINS, I will be able to be mentored by and work with some of the brightest minds in IT. This is an amazing opportunity for me to gain hands-on experience and build important relationships that will be valuable to me as I progress in my career."Other participants are Denise Grayson, Sandia National Laboratories; Julie Locke, Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kali McLennan, University of Oklahoma: Amber Rasche, North Dakota State University; Jessica Shaffer, Georgia Institute of Technology; Julia Staats, CENIC; and, with separate funding, Indira Kassymkhanova of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.The WINS participants were chosen from 28 eligible applicants—a big jump from the 19 applications received the previous year. The selection team weighed a variety of factors, looking for applicants who had experience in networking; whose skillset matched their area of interest; whose participation was supported by their institution; and who added to the group’s diversity, whether geographically, institutionally or otherwise.The WINS awardee selection team, led by Wendy Huntoon of the Keystone Initiative, included Susan Lucas from ESnet, Linda Winkler from Argonne National Labs, Dave Jent from Indiana University, and Florence Hudson from Internet2.Meehl was able to secure funding from the National Science Foundation for participants from research and education organizations. The Department of Energy is supporting the women from its national laboratories.“Although there are more jobs in IT, there’s a massive shortage of workers, especially in the number of women in the field,” Meehl said. “It was really fulfilling this year to see a huge jump in the number of really qualified applicants. It was very hard to choose.”Writer/editor:David Hosansky, Manager of Media Relations

NCAR, UCAR scientists win AMS honors

BOULDER, Colo. — Eight scientists at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) and the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR) have won special honors from the American Meteorological Society (AMS), garnering several of the most prestigious awards in the atmospheric sciences."The large number of award winners demonstrates the extent to which NCAR and UCAR are important leaders in our field," said NCAR Director James Hurrell. "Working with collaborators throughout the research community, these scientists are gaining new understanding of critical atmospheric processes in ways that will advance prediction and better protect society."The AMS, which has more than 13,000 members, is the nation's premier scientific and professional organization for the atmospheric and related sciences. It is presenting the awards to 74 individuals and five organizations. The winners will be recognized at a ceremony in January at the AMS annual meeting in Seattle.NCAR and UCAR honoreesPeggy LeMoneMargaret "Peggy" LeMone (Honorary Member of the AMS). LeMone, an NCAR senior scientist emerita and former AMS president, is being recognized by the society as a person of "acknowledged preeminence" in atmospheric science. An expert on storm structure and the interaction of the boundary layer with clouds and the surface, she served as chief scientist of the worldwide GLOBE science and education program and is the author or co-author of nearly 200 peer-reviewed papers.Richard RotunnoRichard Rotunno (Carl-Gustaf Rossby Research Medal). Rotunno, an NCAR senior scientist, is a leading expert in tornadoes and other severe storms, usingtheory and computer modeling to develop the understanding needed to improve forecasts. He won the Rossby medal — the top AMS honor — for "elegant, rigorous work that has fundamentally increased our understanding of mesoscale and synoptic-scale dynamics, especially the role of vorticity in the atmosphere." Sergey SokolovskiySergey V. Sokolovskiy (Verner E. Suomi Award). Sokolovskiy is a scientist with the UCAR COSMIC program, which uses a satellite-based GPS technology known as radio occultation to measure atmospheric parameters for weather, climate, and space weather applications. He won "for exceptional theoretical and practical contributions to the science and application of radio occultation observations of Earth’s atmosphere." Jennifer KayJennifer Kay (Henry Houghton Award). Kay, a visiting NCAR scientist and University of Colorado Boulder professor, uses observations and computer models to better understand climate variability and change. She won the award "for the innovative use of observations and global climate models to better understand the rapidly evolving climate of the polar regions." Scott EllisScott Ellis (Editor's Award). NCAR scientist Scott Ellis is a radar specialist who focuses on field campaigns and data analysis. An associate editor of the "Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology," Ellis won "for consistently excellent reviews." Mary BarthMary Barth (AMS Fellow). AMS Fellows are recognized for "outstanding contributions" to the atmospheric or related sciences over several years. Barth, an NCAR senior scientist, focuses on interactions between clouds and atmospheric chemistry. Her research, which draws on atmospheric measurements and computer models, sheds light on the effect of storms on gases and particles in the atmosphere that can affect weather and climate. Robert SharmanRobert Sharman (AMS Fellow). Sharman is a veteran NCAR scientist who specializes in atmospheric turbulence and its effect on aircraft. His work, with the Federal Aviation Administration and the airline industry, seeks to better predict turbulence and safely guide aircraft away from it. Christine Wiedinmyer In addition, the AMS granted a special award to the Earth Science Women's Network. Co-founded by NCAR scientist Christine Wiedinmyer, the network is dedicated to career development, peer mentoring, and community building for women in the geosciences. The network, which has grown since its founding in 2002 to more than 2,900 members, won "for inspirational commitment to broadening the participation of women in the Earth sciences, providing a supportive environment for peer mentoring and professional development." "I commend the honorees for their leadership across a remarkable breadth of research," said UCAR President Antonio J Busalacchi. "Our organization is truly a nexus for the expertise and creativity needed to better understand and predict the Earth system and its impacts on society."American Meteorological Society (AMS)Founded in 1919, the AMS is the nation’s premier scientific and professional organization promoting and disseminating information about the atmospheric, oceanic, hydrologic sciences. Its more than 13,000 members include scientists, researchers, educators, broadcast meteorologists, students, weather enthusiasts, and other professionals in the fields of weather, water, and climate.

The Impact of Changing the RRTMG Cloud Overlap Method on Tropical Cyclone Evolution in HWRF

RAL/DTC Seminar

Friday, October 14, 2016 | 11-12 pm | FL2 - Room 1001

National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder

The Impact of Changing the RRTMG Cloud Overlap Method on Tropical Cyclone Evolution in HWRF

Mike Iacono |Atmospheric and Environmental Research

Advanced computer model focuses on Hurricane Matthew

Oct. 6, 2016 | As Hurricane Matthew churns toward the southeastern U.S. coast, scientists at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) are testing an advanced research computer model to see how well it can predict the powerful storm's track and intensity.The Model for Prediction Across Scales (MPAS) uses an innovative software approach that allows scientists to focus on regional conditions while still capturing far-flung atmospheric processes that can influence the storm in question. This is a contrast to the forecast models typically used to track hurricanes today, which cannot simultaneously capture both global and local atmospheric processes.The experimental MPAS model simulates Hurricane Matthew hitting the Southeast. To see a range of model output, visit the MPAS tropical cyclone website. MPAS is able to do both because it uses a flexible mesh that allows it to zoom into higher resolution in some areas — over hurricane breeding grounds, for example — while zooming out over the rest of Earth. This ability to vary resolution across the globe requires a small fraction of the computer power needed to have high resolution everywhere.By testing MPAS during hurricane season, the research team can determine the adjustments that need to be made to the model while gaining insights into how to improve hurricane forecasting in the future."This is an experimental effort," said Chris Davis, a senior scientist and director of NCAR's Mesoscale and Microscale Meteorology Laboratory. "We're doing this to see if we can find systematic biases in the model so we can improve simulations of the tropics in general and hurricanes in particular."Davis and the other members of the research team, including NCAR scientists David Ahijevych, Sang-Hun Park, Bill Skamarock, and Wei Wang, are running MPAS once a day on NCAR's Yellowstone supercomputer, inputting various ocean and atmospheric conditions to see how it performs. The work is supported by the National Science Foundation and the Korea Institute of Science and Technology Information.Even though they are just tests, Davis said the MPAS simulations are often comparable with official forecast models such as those run by the National Hurricane Center and the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts. As Matthew was in its early stages, in fact, MPAS did a better job than other models in simulating the northward movement of the storm from the Caribbean Sea toward the Florida coast.The scientists will analyze how MPAS performed and share the results with colleagues in the meteorological community. It's a step in an ongoing research effort to better predict the formation and behavior of hurricanes."We run the model even when the tropics are quiet, but an event like Matthew gives us a special opportunity to see what contributes to errors in tropical cyclone prediction," Davis said. "While a major hurricane can have catastrophic impacts, we hope to learn from it and make computer models even better in the future."Funders:National Science FoundationKorea Institute of Science and Technology InformationWriter/contact:David Hosansky, Manager of Media Relations

40 Earths: NCAR's Large Ensemble reveals staggering climate variability

Sept. 29, 2016 | Over the last century, Earth's climate has had its natural ups and downs. Against the backdrop of human-caused climate change, fluctuating atmosphere and ocean circulation patterns have caused the melting of Arctic sea ice to sometimes speed up and sometimes slow down, for example. And the back-and-forth formation of El Niño and La Niña events in the Pacific has cause d some parts of the world to get wetter or drier while some parts get warmer or cooler, depending on the year.But what if the sequence of variability that actually occurred over the last century was just one way that Earth's climate story could have plausibly unfolded? What if tiny — even imperceptible — changes in Earth's atmosphere had kicked off an entirely different sequence of naturally occurring climate events?"It's the proverbial butterfly effect," said Clara Deser, a senior climate scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). "Could a butterfly flapping its wings in Mexico set off these little motions in the atmosphere that cascade into large-scale changes to atmospheric circulation?"To explore the possible impact of miniscule perturbations to the climate — and gain a fuller understanding of the range of climate variability that could occur — Deser and her colleague Jennifer Kay, an assistant professor at the University of Colorado Boulder and an NCAR visiting scientist, led a project to run the NCAR-based Community Earth System Model (CESM) 40 times from 1920 forward to 2100. With each simulation, the scientists modified the model's starting conditions ever so slightly by adjusting the global atmospheric temperature by less than one-trillionth of one degree, touching off a unique and chaotic chain of climate events.The result, called the CESM Large Ensemble, is a staggering display of Earth climates that could have been along with a rich look at future climates that could potentially be."We gave the temperature in the atmosphere the tiniest tickle in the model — you could never measure it — and the resulting diversity of climate projections is astounding," Deser said. "It's been really eye-opening for people."The dataset generated during the project, which is freely available, has already proven to be a tremendous resource for researchers across the globe who are interested in how natural climate variability and human-caused climate change interact. In a little over a year, about 100 peer-reviewed scientific journal articles have used data from the CESM Large Ensemble.Winter temperature trends (in degrees Celsius) for North America between 1963 and 2012 for each of 30 members of the CESM Large Ensemble. The variations in warming and cooling in the 30 members illustrate the far-reaching effects of natural variability superimposed on human-induced climate change. The ensemble mean (EM; bottom, second image from right) averages out the natural variability, leaving only the warming trend attributed to human-caused climate change. The image at bottom right (OBS) shows actual observations from the same time period. By comparing the ensemble mean to the observations, the science team was able to parse how much of the warming over North America was due to natural variability and how much was due to human-caused climate change. Read the full study in the American Meteorological Society's Journal of Climate. (© 2016 AMS.) A community effortRunning a complex climate model like the CESM several dozen times takes a vast amount of computing resources, which makes such projects rare and difficult to pull off. With that in mind, Deser and Kay wanted to make sure that the data resulting from the Large Ensemble were as useful as possible. To do that, they queried scientists from across the community who might make use of the project results — oceanographers, geochemists, atmospheric scientists, biologists, socioeconomic researchers — about what they really wanted."It took a village to make this ensemble happen and for it to be useful to and usable by the broad climate community," Kay said. "The result is a large number of ensemble members, in a state-of-the-art climate model, with outputs asked for by the community, that is publicly available and relatively easy to access — it's no wonder it's getting so much use."Scientists have so far relied on the CESM Large Ensemble to study everything from oxygen levels in the ocean to potential geoengineering scenarios to possible changes in the frequency of moisture-laden atmospheric rivers making landfall. In fact, so many researchers have found the Large Ensemble so useful that Kay and Deser were honored with the 2016 CESM Distinguished Achievement Award, which recognizes significant contributions to the climate modeling community.The award citation noted the pair was chosen because "the Large Ensemble represents one of NCAR's most significant contributions to the U.S. climate research community. … At a scientific level, the utility of the Large Ensemble cannot be overstated."The power of multiple runs: Looking forward — and backwardClearly, the CESM Large Ensemble is useful for looking forward: What is the range of possible futures we might expect in the face of a changing climate? How much warmer will summers become? When will summer Arctic sea ice disappear? How will climate change affect ocean life?But the Large Ensemble is also an extremely valuable tool for understanding our past. This vast storehouse of data helps scientists evaluate observations and put them in context: How unusual is a particular heat wave? Is a recent change in rainfall patterns the result of global warming or could it be from solely natural causes?With only a single model run, scientists are limited in what they can conclude when an observation doesn't match up with a model's projection. For example, if the Arctic sea ice extent were to expand, even though the model projected a decline, what would that mean? Is the physics underlying the model wrong? Or does the model incorrectly capture the natural variability? In other words, if you ran the model more times, with slightly different starting conditions, would one of the model runs correctly project the growth in sea ice?The Large Ensemble helps answer that question. Armed with 40 different simulations, scientists can characterize the range of historic natural variability. With this information, they can determine if observations fit within the envelope of natural variability outlined in the model, instead of comparing them to a single run.Creating an envelope of what can be considered natural also makes it possible to see when the signal of human-caused climate change has pushed an observation beyond the natural variability. The Large Ensemble can also clarify the climate change "signal" in the model. That's because averaging together the 40 ensemble members can effectively cancel out the natural variability — a La Niña in one model run might cancel out an El Niño in another, for example — leaving behind only changes due to climate change."This new ability to separate natural internal variability from externally driven trends is absolutely critical for moving forward our understanding of climate and climate change," said Galen McKinley, a professor of atmospheric and oceanic sciences at the University of Wisconsin–Madison.McKinley used the Large Ensemble — which she called a "transformative tool" — to study changes in the ocean's ability to take up carbon dioxide in a warming climate.The two components of the climate systemThe CESM Large Ensemble is not the first ensemble of climate simulations, though it is perhaps the most comprehensive and widely used. Scientists have long understood that it makes sense to look at more than one model run. Frequently, however, scientists have done this by comparing simulations from different climate models, collectively called a multi-model ensemble.This method gives a feel for the diversity of possible outcomes, but it doesn't allow researchers to determine why two model simulations might differ: Is it because the models themselves represent the physics of the Earth system differently? Or is it because the models have different representations of the natural variability or different sensitivities to changing carbon dioxide concentrations?The Large Ensemble helps resolve this dilemma. Because each member is run using the same model, the differences between runs can be attributed to differences in natural variability alone. The Large Ensemble also offers context for comparing simulations in a multi-model ensemble. If the simulations appear to disagree about what the future may look like—but they still fit within the envelope of natural variability characterized by the Large Ensemble—that could be a clue that the models do not actually disagree on the fundamentals. Instead, they may just be representing different sequences of natural variability.This ability to put model results in context is important, not just for scientists but for policy makers, according to Noah Diffenbaugh, a climate scientist at Stanford University who has used the Large Ensemble in several studies, including one that looks at the contribution of climate change to the recent, severe California drought.“It’s pretty common for real-world decision makers to look at the different simulations from different models, and throw up their hands and say, 'These models don't agree so I can't make decisions,'" he said. "In reality, it may not be that the models are disagreeing. Instead, we may be seeing the actual uncertainty of the climate system. There is some amount of natural uncertainty that we can't reduce — that information is really important for making robust decisions, and the Large Ensemble is giving us a window that we haven’t had before.”Deser agrees that it's important to communicate to the public that, in the climate system, there will always be this "irreducible" uncertainty."We’re always going to have these two components to the climate system: human-induced changes and natural variability. You always have to take both into account," Deser said. "In the future, it will all depend on how the human-induced component is either offset — or augmented — by the sequence of natural variability that unfolds."About the articleTitle: The Community Earth System Model (CESM) Large Ensemble Project: A Community Resource for Studying Climate Change in the Presence of Internal Climate VariabilityAuthors:  J. E. Kay, C. Deser, A. Phillips, A. Mai, C. Hannay, G. Strand, J. M. Arblaster, S. C. Bates, G. Danabasoglu, J. Edwards, M. Holland, P. Kushner, J.-F. Lamarque, D. Lawrence, K. Lindsay, A. Middleton, E. Munoz, R. Neale, K. Oleson, L. Polvani, and M. VertensteinJournal: Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society, DOI: 10.1175/BAMS-D-13-00255.1Funders: National Science FoundationU.S. Department of EnergyIn the news: Stories about research using the CESM Large EnsembleCauses of California drought linked to climate change, Stanford scientists sayStanford University (UCAR Member)The difficulty of predicting an ice-free ArcticUniversity of Colorado Boulder (UCAR Member)Widespread loss of ocean oxygen to become noticeable in 2030sNCARCornell Scientist Predicts Climate Change Will Prompt Earlier Spring Start DateCornell University (UCAR Member)The 2-degree goal and the question of geoengineeringNCAR New climate model better predicts changes to ocean-carbon sinkUniversity of Wisconsin Madison (UCAR Member)Future summers could regularly be hotter than the hottest on recordNCARExtreme-Weather Winters Becoming More CommonStanford (UCAR Member)More frequent extreme precipitation ahead for western North AmericaPacific Northwest National LaboratoryCloudy With A Chance of WarmingUniversity of Colorado Boulder (UCAR Member)Climate change already accelerating sea level rise, study finds NCARLess ice, more water in Arctic Ocean by 2050s, new CU-Boulder study findsUniversity of Colorado Boulder (UCAR Member)California 2100: More frequent and more severe droughts and floods likelyPacific Northwest National Laboratory Searing heat waves detailed in study of future climateNCAR Did climate change, El Nino make Texas floods worse?Utah State University (UCAR Member)Writer/contact:Laura Snider, Senior Science Writer and Public Information Officer

Food security report wins USDA award

BOULDER, Colo. — A comprehensive report warning of the impacts of climate change on the world's food security has won a top U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) award."Climate Change, Global Food Security, and the U.S. Food System," with co-authors from the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), provides an overview of recent research in climate change and agriculture. It warns that warmer temperatures and altered precipitation patterns can threaten food production, disrupt transportation systems, and degrade food safety, among other impacts, and that the world's poor and those living in tropical regions are particularly vulnerable.Michael Scuse, USDA acting deputy secretary (center), with members of the team of experts who produced the award-winning report, "Climate Change, Global Food Security, and the U.S. Food System." Those pictured are (back row from left): William Easterling (The Pennsylvania State University), Edward Carr (Clark University), and Peter Backlund (Colorado State University); front row from left: Rachel Melnick (USDA), Margaret Walsh (USDA), Scuse, Moffat Ngugi (U.S. Agency for International Development/USDA), and Karen Griggs (NCAR). (Photo by USDA.) The USDA this month named it as the winner of the 2016 Abraham Lincoln Honor Award for Increasing Global Food Security. The Abraham Lincoln Honor Award is the most prestigious USDA award presented by the Secretary of Agriculture, recognizing noteworthy accomplishments that significantly contribute to the advancement of the USDA's strategic goals, mission objectives, and overall management excellence.The report was produced as part of a collaboration between NCAR, the USDA, and the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR), which manages NCAR on behalf of the National Science Foundation. It was written by 32 experts from 19 federal, academic, nongovernmental, intergovernmental, and private organizations in the United States, Argentina, Britain, and Thailand. The authors included three NCAR scientists, as well as eight experts affiliated with UCAR member universities."This award highlights the importance of addressing climate change in order to maintain the progress the world has made on food security in recent decades," said NCAR program director Lawrence Buja, who helped oversee production of the report. "Scientists will continue to study this critical issue and work with decision makers to co-develop the information they need about potential climate impacts on future production, distribution, and other aspects of our U.S. and global food systems."Published under the auspices of the U.S. Global Change Research Program, the reportfocuses on identifying climate change impacts on global food security through 2100. The authors emphasize that food security — the ability of people to obtain and use sufficient amounts of safe and nutritious food — will be affected by several factors in addition to climate change, such as technological advances, increases in population, the distribution of wealth, and changes in eating habits."Climate change has a myriad of potential impacts, especially on food, water, and energy systems," said UCAR President Antonio J. Busalacchi. "I commend the authors of this report for clearly analyzing this very complex issue in the agriculture sector, which has implications for all of society, from the least developed nations to the most advanced economies."Report authorsMolly Brown, University of Maryland*John Antle, Oregon State University*Peter Backlund, Colorado State University *Edward Carr, Clark UniversityBill Easterling, Pennsylvania State University*Margaret Walsh, USDA Office of the Chief Economist/Climate Change Program OfficeCaspar Ammann, NCARWitsanu Attavanich, Kasetsart UniversityChris Barrett, Cornell University*Marc Bellemare, University of Minnesota*Violet Dancheck, U.S. Agency for International DevelopmentChris Funk, U.S. Geological SurveyKathryn Grace, University of Utah*John Ingram, University of OxfordHui Jiang, USDA Foreign Agricultural ServiceHector Maletta, Universidad de Buenos AiresTawny Mata, USDA/American Association for the Advancement of ScienceAnthony Murray, USDA-Economic Research ServiceMoffatt Ngugi, U.S. Agency for International Development/USDA Foreign Agricultural ServiceDennis Ojima, Colorado State University*Brian O'Neill, NCARClaudia Tebaldi, NCAR*UCAR member universityReport project teamLawrence Buja, NCARKaren Griggs, NCAR 

Welcome Cheyenne: New supercomputer arrives in Wyoming

Sept. 19, 2016 | Last Monday, five semi trucks loaded down with NCAR's next supercomputer, Cheyenne, arrived at the NCAR-Wyoming Supercomputing Center after a long drive from Wisconsin. Staff from Silicon Graphics International Corp. (SGI), which built the computer along with the NCAR project team, have been working since on the hardware installation, which should be completed in about another week. Software installation and system integration work will begin after all the hardware has been installed and checked out.


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