November 03, 2010
International collaboration has always been at the heart of COSMIC, a six-satellite network that intercepts GPS signals to measure weather, climate, and space weather variables. Now one of the leading university collaborators on COSMIC, the University of Graz, is UCAR’s latest international affiliate.
UCAR president Rick Anthes and representatives from University of Graz
November 02, 2010
Kevin Knupp at the University of Alabama investigates heat bursts, unusual pockets of very warm, dry air descending from thunderstorms.
Kevin Knupp
November 02, 2010
Julia Slingo from the U.K. Met Office foresees physicists and mathematicians engaging with many other disciplines to provide world-class weather and climate science and services.
Julia Slingo, UK Met Office
November 02, 2010
There was no gold medal, no podium ceremony, and definitely no tears from the losers on 30 July, but there was a new national champion. On that date, NOAA proclaimed that a South Dakota hailstone had surpassed all contenders in both size and weight.
Charles Knight with 2010 Vivian, SD, hailstone
November 02, 2010
UCAR president Rick Anthes says the good forecasts of Hurricane Earl were not unusual. The accuracy of hurricane track forecasts has increased steadily over the years.
Hurricane Earl
November 02, 2010
It’s not exactly a moment for celebration, but when a tropical storm is born in the Atlantic, millions of people learn about it quickly. As with any birth, though, a great deal has to happen in just the right way before a tropical storm is christened.
NASA’s DC-8 shuttled to St. Croix for a flight into the remnants of Gaston
October 26, 2010
A new computer simulation of a deadly, fast-spreading 2006 wildfire in California shows how far researchers have come in their quest to better understand fire dynamics.
UCAR Magazine
October 18, 2010
A team of NCAR scientists is studying how advanced satellite technology that measures lightning could help protect aircraft from turbulence caused by severe weather.
Lightning flashing from clouds down to the ground.
September 16, 2010
Can a distant hurricane play havoc with your GPS unit? Scientists aren’t sure of the answer, but they suspect that hurricanes affect more than land and water.
model simulation of wind and density in outer atmosphere
September 08, 2010
On December 20, 2008, a Boeing 737 with Continental Airlines encountered a crosswind gust during takeoff at Denver International Airport, causing it to veer off the runway. Simulations done at NCAR indicate that a mountain lee wave amplified over DIA within minutes of the accident.
Lenticular clouds at sunset over the Front Range.
August 25, 2010
NCAR scientists are collaborating with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to help fight plague in Uganda. Plague is believed to have been responsible for the Black Death pandemic that swept Europe in the 14th century, killing more than 25 million people.
Two rats crawling in a house.
August 18, 2010
A windstorm that swept across Kansas, Missouri, and Illinois on May 8, 2009, was so remarkably fierce that NCAR scientists coined a new term to describe it: super derecho.
Two images side by side, the first from radar and the second from the WRF model.
July 27, 2010
A turbulence warning system alerting pilots landing at and departing from Juneau International Airport in southeast Alaska has taken a significant step toward completion with the integration of Federal Aviation Administration radio communications into the system.
Photo of mountains and ocean around Juneau, taken from the air.
July 20, 2010
Researchers and aircraft will search for secrets of hurricane formation above the tropical Atlantic Ocean.
Hurricane Felix satellite image
June 17, 2010
In the spring of 2009, researchers on the Second Verification of the Origins of Rotation in Tornadoes Experiment (VORTEX2) field project set out across the Great Plains to study tornadoes, but that’s not the only phenomenon they observed.
A truck driving down an empty highway with a menacing storm in the background.
June 14, 2010
Turboprop and jet aircraft can create hole-punch clouds, which have long fascinated the public.
hole-punch cloud
June 10, 2010
They’ve been called “crop circles in the sky.” Across the world, sightings of oddly circular holes within cloud layers—dubbed hole-punch clouds by scientists—have triggered bemusement and speculation.
Andy Heymsfield
June 09, 2010
Cirrus clouds—thin strands or sheets usually composed of ice crystals—form high in the atmosphere. A new study led by NCAR scientist Steve Massie employs satellite technology to observe the clouds in greater detail than before.
Thin, wispy cirrus clouds in the sky.
June 09, 2010
Stephen Cavallo (University of Oklahoma) examines polar lows, a potentially significant factor in generating wintertime cyclones.
Steven Cavallo
June 09, 2010
Rick Anthes, UCAR president, examines the unprecedented boom in the atmospheric sciences after World War II.
Earthrise from Apollo 10, December 1968
May 28, 2010
The sirens sound when the skies turn black and violent supercell thunderstorms roar through.
UCAR Magazine
May 17, 2010
The year 2010 brought a difficult and sometimes tragic few months of weather events—first the snowstorms and record cold that battered much of the Northern Hemisphere, then tornadoes and floods in the United States.
Atlantic sea-surface temperatures, May 2010
May 11, 2010
After a very unusual tornado caused extensive damage along a 34-mile (55-kilometer) swath of northern Colorado in 2008, a team of scientists from NCAR and Colorado State University undertook a multidisciplinary study integrating meteorology, climatology, and social science.
Radar image of Windsor tornado.
April 28, 2010
The collaborative international project, involving scientists from NCAR and other organizations, may ultimately improve tornado forecasting.
February 25, 2010
Like a cat toying with its prey, an intense area of low pressure took swipes at New England and the mid-Atlantic.
UCAR Magazine

Pages

Subscribe to