June 17, 2015
The SUMMA model lets users make individual decisions about how to treat a vast range of variables. This customizing allows users to mimic existing models or create something entirely new.
Hydrologic model lets users decide: side-by-side grid and basin maps
April 20, 2015
A new study estimates how much carbon dioxide is likely to be absorbed by plants by the end of the century.
Predicting plant uptake of carbon: photo of trees and ferns in Costa Rica
March 31, 2015
NCAR is taking part in a major international project to study how climate change will affect tropical rainforests around the world.
Climate and tropical forests: photo of tropical rainforest
December 30, 2014
A new study led by NASA and NCAR shows that tropical forests may be absorbing far more human-emitted carbon dioxide than many scientists thought.
tropical rain forests and CO2: Serra do Mar Paranaense, Brazil
September 08, 2014
Ozone pollution in India is damaging millions of tons of the country’s major crops, according to a new study by an international team of researchers. The pollution caused losses of more than $1 billion in a single year, destroying enough food to feed an estimated 94 million people.
Ground-level ozone's toll: A traffic jam in Delhi, India
July 25, 2014
The world faces a small but substantially increased risk over the next two decades of a major slowdown in the growth of global yields of corn and wheat because of warming temperatures.
Crops and climate change: Wheat ripens in a California field
April 10, 2014
Climate change will reduce water availability during dry seasons and increase it during wet seasons around the globe, new research suggests. It also finds there will be large regional variations in water-related impacts.
Water: too much, too little - Image shows effects of major drought on plants across U.S. on June 24, 2011
March 21, 2014
In recent years, spring snow has vanished even more quickly than computer models and climate scientists had expected, posing a research challenge and a potentially serious risk for water supplies.
Early snowmelt risk: Photo of daffodils amid late-winter snow in West Virginia
April 15, 2013
Forests across western North America have been ravaged by the most extensive bark beetle attacks on record. Scientists are getting a better handle on what comes next—and the answers aren’t as straightforward as they expected.
Mountain pine beetle damage near Grand Lake, Colorado
February 19, 2013
Farmers and other stakeholders are hungry for guidance on how crops may fare as the nation’s climate evolves over the coming decades. This year’s National Climate Assessment includes new findings on agriculture and climate change that draw from collaborations between NCAR and the U.S. Department of Agriculture.
Connecting agriculture & climate: Agricultural engineer Kenneth Sudduth examines samples of grain collected by a combine
August 13, 2012
Until supplies approach a trickle—or a torrent—public attention seldom focuses on water issues. But water is consistently Topic A for a wide-ranging group of researchers.
Illustration comparing total global water to much tinier total freshwater
August 13, 2012
States are having to make tough decisions regarding their water use and their interaction with water. NCAR scientists are involved in collaborative projects in Colorado, Louisiana, and Oklahoma to evaluate the long-term effects of today’s decisions.
UCAR Magazine
August 13, 2012
One of the largest bodies of water in the United States, the Ogallala Aquifer, lies underground. Crucial to life in the U.S. Great Plains, it's one of many aquifers around the world under stress as water demands increase. Satellite data are now painting a richer picture of how these water stores are evolving.
August 13, 2012
As rising temperatures melt glaciers around the world, scientists are tracking the changes and helping glacier-dependent regions adapt to a changing water supply.
Glacier in Alaska
August 06, 2012
Whether you’re looking at the next few weeks or the next few decades, many parts of the United States are likely to face the silent but devastating impacts of drought.
Global map showing regions drying by 2090s
April 03, 2012
March is normally the snowiest month of the year across parts of the central Rockies, but March 2012 left much of Colorado snowless and nervous.
Tallgrass struggles against drought in this file photo from eastern Colorado.
March 15, 2012
Days lengthen as spring arrives, but several other signs of the season are showing up earlier and earlier. Some animals and insects aren’t adapting fast enough to this "asynchrony," and there's an increasing disconnect with legal dates that govern hunting and other resource management.
Japanese cherry tree blossoms, Tidal Basin, Washington, DC
February 02, 2012
A new computer modeling study from NCAR investigates how an increase in shrubs in the Arctic may affect permafrost. Over the past few decades, a warming climate has meant that the Arctic’s grassy tundra is being increasingly overtaken by shrubs.
January 30, 2012
Volcanic eruptions and resulting changes to sea ice and ocean currents may be the cause.
October 03, 2011
A team that includes NCAR scientists Anne Boynard and Alex Guenther has found that the rate at which plant canopies emit isoprene, a volatile organic compound, is influenced by circadian rhythms.
Rain forest with lots of large ferns in the foreground.
July 21, 2011
If you’re an American, it’s tough to avoid corn. This ubiquitous starch turns up in soft drinks, compostable cups, and automobile fuel—and even plays a role in U.S. heat waves, including the intense one of 2011.
field of corn
June 09, 2011
Prior to massive flooding early in 2011, long-term drought plagued the Australian state of Queensland . As part of a broad research program on cloud seeding, NCAR researchers have been steadily crunching data from a 2008–09 field project that looked into how to make the clouds drop more rain on the region.
classroom scene
June 07, 2011
New research focusing on the Houston area suggests that widespread urban development alters weather patterns in a way that can make it easier for pollutants to accumulate during warm summer weather instead of being blown out to sea.
April 08, 2011
Alaska is among the fastest-warming places on Earth, with its interior region warming the most statewide. A study by NCAR’s Shannon McNeeley looks at the vulnerability to climate change of native rural communities.
Alaska Natives in a boat on the river with a moose they've just killed.
March 01, 2011
A study led by NCAR postdoctoral researcher Jia Hu and Julia Klein from Colorado State University looks at the relationship between plants, water, carbon, and climate on the Tibetan Plateau, which is warming at a rate twice that of the global average.
The skull of a yak with prayer flats on it and a lake and mountains behind


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