Policy & Society

Hurricane Sandy storm surge-wreckage of New Jersey roller coaster
December 31, 2012
More than two days ahead of landfall, it was clear that Hurricane Sandy could bring higher water than New York and New Jersey had seen in decades. But for thousands of people in the area, the threat simply didn’t register. (Part 1 of 2)
Cars buried in snow during March 2003 storm in Boulder County, CO
October 04, 2012
The United States faces more varied weather risks than most nations on Earth, but we also have uniquely strong capabilities to confront these risks, thanks to decades of research conducted by government agencies, universities, and the private weather industry.
Worker hoses commercial jet with deicing fluid from "cherry picker"
September 21, 2012
Innovative technologies are moving from the laboratory to the world at large through UCAR-facilitated teamwork.
solar panels
September 11, 2012
With its enormous computing capacity and speed, the new NCAR-Wyoming supercomputer will dramatically advance our understanding of Earth, helping to tackle major questions affecting our economy, health, and well-being.
UCAR Magazine
August 31, 2012
Researchers at NCAR are working with forecasters and emergency managers to unravel the communication challenges around hurricanes like Isaac, which had relatively weak winds but a strong storm surge.
August 17, 2012
Studies show 63% of hurricane-related deaths occur inland. To help emergency managers prepare, NCAR scientists are pinpointing vulnerable populations using tropical storm winds, census data, and flood maps.

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The University Corporation for Atmospheric Research manages the National Center for Atmospheric Research under sponsorship by the National Science Foundation. Any opinions, findings and conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.

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