February 16, 2010
NCAR and university researchers are collaborating with the U.S. Department of Agriculture and Federal Aviation Administration to study how bird-detecting radar at airports could help prevent dangerous airplane bird strikes.
A crane on the broken windshield of a helicoptor.
January 28, 2010
A new study led by NCAR scientist Peter Lawrence has found that impacts to Earth's hydrological cycle are the most important driving force in how land use changes affect climate.
Deforestation in Brazil.
January 14, 2010
A team led by NCAR's Jim Smith has found that aminium salts make up as much as half of the mass of newly formed particles in places as diverse as Atlanta, Mexico City, northeast Colorado, and Finland.
Cattle on a feedlot.
January 10, 2010
The solar minimum that bottomed out from 2006 to 2010 was the longest and deepest since modern space observations began. Among other effects, it reorganized the areas of flux from open magnetic field lines that produce solar wind.
A diagram of the Sun.
January 08, 2010
NCAR scientist Natasha Flyer is using an innovative method known as radial basis function (RBF) to model simple physical processes in the geosciences. The research is poised to offer a new way of solving equations that could significantly improve models used by atmospheric and solar scientists.
Two sperical images side-by-side.
December 10, 2009
A collaboration of scientists that includes UCAR's John Braun is pioneering a new technique for using GPS satellite signals to measure snow depth as well as soil and vegetation moisture.
Marshall Field Site
December 09, 2009
NCAR researchers are increasingly adopting an innovative tool for statistical computing and graphics. Called R, this community software project is the statistics equivalent of the LINUX movement.
A graph showing temperature data.
November 06, 2009
How do people and organizations respond to extreme weather events—in particular, flash floods? Flash floods are already on average the leading cause of weather-related fatalities in the United States and second most common worldwide.
Flooded highway.
October 15, 2009
Preliminary research at NCAR suggests that biological particles may contribute significantly to the mass of organic carbon stored in atmospheric aerosols. The study is an important step for scientists.
Christine Wiedinmyer taking measurements at Storm Peak Laboratory.
October 01, 2009
When it comes to global air pollution, what goes around comes around. Air pollution from factories, traffic, and power plants in Asia wafts over the Pacific Ocean to the United States, while pollutants produced in the United States wind up in Europe.
Map of globe showing carbon monoxide transport.
September 14, 2009
In 2006, a team of NCAR researchers convened in Mexico City for MIRAGE, a study of the chemical and physical transformation of air pollution in urban areas and its impact on air quality, ecosystems, and climate. Another MIRAGE field campaign kicks off this month, this time in Shanghai, China's largest city.
Factories on the shores of the lower Yangtze River in China.
September 10, 2009
The stretch of the subcontinent that runs from eastern Pakistan across northern India into Bangladesh is likely the world's most intensively irrigated region. A new NCAR study shows that between 2002 and 2008, the region depleted groundwater at a rate of around 13 cubic miles per year.
Side-by-side maps of India showing grounwater depletion.
August 27, 2009
A team of NCAR researchers led by Jacob Fugal is developing and testing a specialized instrument that uses digital holography to measure tiny cloud droplets.
HOLODEC 2 installed on Gulfstream V aircraft.
July 28, 2009
A new study led by NCAR scientist David Edwards is the first to apply the concept of Observing System Simulation Experiments to chemical weather (predicting pollution events and variability in the atmosphere’s chemical composition).
Pollution
July 02, 2009
An experimental modeling study by a team of scientists that includes NCAR’s Hanli Liu (High Altitude Observatory) points to the propagation of waves upward from the lower atmosphere as a driver for variability in the ionosphere. The research is an important step toward better understanding space weather.
Cirrocumulus clouds
June 08, 2009
NCAR researchers are studying whether the eruption of Indonesia’s Mt. Toba supervolcano about 70,000–75,000 years ago may have cooled Earth enough to initiate an ice age and potentially alter the course of human evolution.
A satellite image.
May 20, 2009
A new technique developed at NCAR will help asteroseismologists learn about stars from their oscillations, or “starquakes.” These variations in the brightness of stars reveal information about their internal structures.
Kepler satellite orbiting the Sun
May 11, 2009
One of the challenges for global climate modelers is accurately simulating cloud cover and its changes over time. This is vital for projecting future temperatures, rainfall, and other aspects of global and regional climate change.
Aerial photo of cumulus clouds
May 07, 2009
Using a highly efficient modeling technique, Pablo Ortiz (University of Granada) and Piotr Smolarkiewicz (ESSL/MMM) have simulated the role of winds in forming sand dunes and sandholes.
Sand dunes in the Atacama Desert
April 14, 2009
NCAR researchers are looking at how new generations of super-fast Graphical Processing Units (GPUs) and multicore chips, such as the Cell Broadband Engine, can be used in atmospheric models.
Sky with towering cumulus clouds
April 06, 2009
The 2008 Super Tuesday tornado outbreak swept through several southern states and the lower Ohio Valley, killing 57 people. NCAR scientist Julie Demuth helped the National Weather Service assess the societal impacts of the deadly storms.
The funnel cloud of a tornado
March 18, 2009
NCAR scientists are exploring the use of a novel statistical technique to help steer intercontinental flights away from thunderstorms.
Test of one-hour prediction skill for locations of showers and thunderstorms
March 11, 2009
NCAR scientists are working on a bigger, bolder version of WACCM (the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model), called WACCM-eXtension, or WACCM-X for short. The enhanced version extends the model to an altitude of about 310 miles.
Coronal mass ejection
March 09, 2009
A team of researchers that includes NCAR’s Synte Peacock and Frank Bryan has carried out the first-ever century-long global ocean simulations with high enough resolution to capture mesoscale eddies.
Ocean wave
February 17, 2009
NCAR scientist Fei Chen is collaborating with colleagues at China’s Institute of Urban Meteorology to explore how growth in Beijing is changing the city’s summer rainfall patterns, focusing specifically on the relationship between urban expansion, aerosols, and summer rainfall.
Sunset over Beijing, China

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