Three NCAR scientists named AGU Fellows

August 13, 2015

BOULDER – Three senior scientists with the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) have been named Fellows of the American Geophysical Union (AGU) for advancing Earth science and related fields.

The three honorees are Bette Otto-Bliesner, William Randel, and Michael Thompson. Thompson is currently serving as interim president of the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR), which manages NCAR under sponsorship of the National Science Foundation.

Three NCAR scientists named AGU Fellows, including Michael Thompson
Michael Thompson
Three NCAR scientists named AGU Fellows, including Bette Otto-Bliesner
Bette Otto-Bliesner
Three NCAR scientists named AGU Fellows, including Bill Randel
Bill Randel

The three are among 60 individuals from across the United States and overseas selected as Fellows this year of the AGU, which has almost 60,000 members worldwide. The honor recognizes those who have made exceptional scientific contributions and attained acknowledged eminence in the fields of Earth and space sciences.

“This is outstanding recognition for our science,” said NCAR Director James Hurrell. “It is a well-deserved honor for these three dedicated researchers who have advanced our understanding of the atmosphere and the Sun.”

Of the 60 Fellows, more than half come from UCAR’s 105 member colleges and universities. The Fellows will be recognized during a ceremony on Dec. 16 during the AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco.

Thompson is an internationally recognized solar physicist with expertise in the structure and dynamics of the interior of the Sun and of other stars. He has worked extensively on analysis of scientific data from several space missions and ground-based observing networks to advance understanding of the physics of the Sun.

Otto-Bliesner, one of the world's leading climate modelers, specializes in using computer-based models of Earth's climate system to study past environmental change. She has contributed as a lead author to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), which shared the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize.

Randel is one of the world’s foremost experts on ozone depletion in the stratosphere, including the so-called ozone hole. He focuses on the chemistry of the atmosphere, and has played a leading role with such international science organizations as the IPCC and the World Meteorological Organization.

The three join 25 other NCAR scientists who were named AGU Fellows in past years.

The AGU is dedicated to advancing the Earth and space sciences for the benefit of humanity through its scholarly publications, conferences, and outreach programs. It is a not-for-profit, professional, scientific organization representing members in 139 countries.

 


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The University Corporation for Atmospheric Research manages the National Center for Atmospheric Research under sponsorship by the National Science Foundation. Any opinions, findings and conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.