UCAR statement on nomination of Barry Myers to head NOAA

Myers is a leader of the American weather industry

October 12, 2017

BOULDER, Colo. — The University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR) congratulates Barry Myers on his nomination as administrator of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

Myers is CEO of AccuWeather and a leader of the American weather industry. He lent important support for the Weather Research and Forecasting Innovation Act of 2017, which emphasizes subseasonal to seasonal weather prediction — a priority for business and community leaders who need more reliable forecasts of weather patterns weeks to months in advance.

His nomination, announced today by the White House, comes at a critical time as the United States works to strengthen its resilience to severe weather events and regain global leadership in the field of weather prediction.

"From my years of working with Barry, I know he appreciates the importance of re-establishing U.S. preeminence in weather prediction," said UCAR President Antonio Busalacchi. "I look forward to hearing Barry’s plans to improve weather forecasting through partnerships among government agencies, private companies, and the university community. As we have seen from the recent hurricanes, timely and accurate forecasts are critical for evacuating residents and protecting lives and property, as well as strengthening our economy and safeguarding national security.”

In addition to running the National Weather Service, NOAA engages in weather and climate research and operates weather satellites and a national environmental data center. The agency also works to better understand and protect the nation's coasts, oceans, and fisheries.


 

 

 


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