In Brief

Future of weather prediction: Thunderstorm near Denver's Front Range radar
July 10, 2014
More than 1,000 forecasters, researchers, and other professionals from around the globe will convene in Montréal on August 16–21 for a first-of-a-kind meeting aimed at pooling international thought on where weather prediction is headed. NCAR and UCAR participants are on tap to cover a wide range of promising developments.
Map showing areas of US Northeast and Midwest where Lyme disease is most common
July 09, 2014
Warmer temperatures, higher humidity, and less rain help lead to an earlier Lyme disease season, researchers have found. They have also identified several weather variables that can be used to predict the onset and peak of the next seasons.
Space junk: Artist's depiction of space debris circling Earth
July 02, 2014
Space debris poses serious risks to a wide array of satellites critical to society. NCAR is part of a collaborative effort to help reduce those risks by modeling the effects of space weather on satellite orbits, helping operators steer spacecraft more accurately around debris.
Research radar on the road: S-Pol radar in the Maldives
June 18, 2014
In a first for NCAR, the center’s Colorado-based S-Pol research radar is being operated from 1,600 miles away. Four students at North Carolina State University are learning about severe storm structure and radar operations at the same time.
Hurricanes, risk, and response: National Guard monitors Key West beach as Hurricane Ike approaches, 9/9/08
June 11, 2014
The perceived gender of a hurricane’s name is just one of many factors potentially shaping how someone reacts to a given storm, according to several scientists at NCAR who take a multifaceted approach to studying hurricane response.
Climate simulations for late 21st-century temperature from different scenarios: IPCC AR5, Ch. 12, FAQ 12.1
June 03, 2014
Researchers are finding new ways to work with aspects of climate change that are surprisingly linear, an approach that could help save time and money in future climate research while providing a richer range of information to help guide policy.
Sources of airborne wind energy: Forecast-model depiction of winds at 850-mb level on 1/30/13
May 28, 2014
What if all the energy needed by society existed just a mile or two above our heads? NCAR, the University of Delaware, and the energy firm Garrad Hassan have begun examining where the strongest winds are and how much electricity they may be able to generate.
Effects of gravity waves: Noctilucent clouds over Helsinki, Finland, on July 2, 2012
May 21, 2014
A field project this June and July will study gravity waves, towering atmospheric features little-known to the public. Novel instruments to be deployed for the international DEEPWAVE project, based in New Zealand, will provide an unprecedented view of gravity waves, a major shaper of atmospheric variability at multiple heights.
El Niño’s high-altitude highway: Map showing temperature anomalies during El Niño and La Niña years with sudden stratospheric warmings, 1958-2013
May 14, 2014
El Niño exerts its global impact through two different atmospheric pathways, one located miles above the other—a finding that may help bolster regional climate prediction.
Flash flooding on Boulder's Bear Creek during record rainfall, 9/12/13
May 07, 2014
Two one-hour webinars on May 20 and 21 will feature nationally recognized hydrometeorologist Matt Kelsch on the science behind flash flooding, including the conditions that lead to extreme rainfall and what happens to all that rain after it falls.

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The University Corporation for Atmospheric Research manages the National Center for Atmospheric Research under sponsorship by the National Science Foundation. Any opinions, findings and conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.

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