NCAR scientists work to improve sharing, storing of hydrology data

Project supports collaborative hydrology research

NCAR scientists Martyn Clark and David Gochis are part of an effort funded by the National Science Foundation to improve Hydroshare. The project is being led by Utah State University, a UCAR member institution. The following is an excerpt from a USU news release.

Sept. 29, 2017 | Utah State University hydrologists are revolutionizing the way scientific data is stored and shared among scientists around the globe.

USU’s David Tarboton will lead a $4 million National Science Foundation-funded collaborative effort aimed at improving HydroShare – an online database system that simplifies the storage and sharing of hydrological data and models.

“Hydroshare is an online system for the scientific community that allows us to easily and freely share products from our research,” said Tarboton, a professor of civil and environmental engineering and a leading hydrology expert who helped create HydroShare. “We’re interested in sharing not just the scientific publication summarizing a study, but also the data and models used to create that study.”

Tarboton says sharing scientific data helps researchers collaborate and improves the quality of data and scientific knowledge. Enhancing HydroShare’s capabilities, he added, will help hydrologists and a broad community of earth-science researchers transform data sharing techniques and accelerate the pace of discovery. Improvements to HydroShare include enhancements to data sharing tools, and new features that enable its 1,000-plus users to develop their own unique apps to access HydroShare resources.

Read the full news release.

 


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The University Corporation for Atmospheric Research manages the National Center for Atmospheric Research under sponsorship by the National Science Foundation. Any opinions, findings and conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.