January 21, 2015
The affiliation establishes a long-term collaboration between UCAR's science education center and the Smithsonian.
UCAR named Smithsonian Affiliate: Kids experiment with cloud exhibit
December 30, 2014
A new study led by NASA and NCAR shows that tropical forests may be absorbing far more human-emitted carbon dioxide than many scientists thought.
tropical rain forests and CO2: Serra do Mar Paranaense, Brazil

Ever notice an earthy smell in the air after a light rain? Now scientists at MIT believe they may have identified the mechanism that releases this aroma, as well as other aerosols, into the environment.

Aerosol generation after drop impingement on porous media is a three-step process, consisting of bubble formation, bubble growth, and bubble bursting.  Image courtesy of Youngsoo Joung

To accurately forecast wintertime bad air days in Utah’s Uintah Basin, researchers must use real atmospheric measurements to estimate chemical emissions from nearby oil and natural gas fields, a new study in Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics has found. 

Smoke from oil refinery
February 9, 2015 | While some folks were looking to Punxsutawney Phil on Groundhog Day, scientists were learning about the weather through a different route: flying a highly advanced cloud radar on its maiden voyage above a major northeast storm.
The powerful HIAPER Cloud Radar, mounted in the white pod, flies over a major Nor'easter
February 2, 2015 | The difference between a breath of cold air and a breath of warm air isn’t just the temperature. It’s also the pollutants they might contain. Until now, wintertime air pollution hasn’t been studied in much detail. Scientists have focused more on warm air, partly because summertime's stagnant atmospheric conditions and intense sunshine tend to worsen ozone pollution. But that's about to change as researchers turn their attention to winter air quality in the eastern United States.
Air quality in WINTER: Map highlighting research areas for WINTER field campaign
January 7, 2015 | A new study in Geophysical Research Letters offers for the first time unequivocal evidence that large storms move significant amounts of ozone from the stratosphere down to the troposphere, the lowest part of the atmosphere. The finding has implications for global climate because tropospheric ozone is a powerful greenhouse gas as well as a pollutant that affects human health and the environment.
Thunderstorms and ozone:  A rotating supercell thunderstorm moves across northeast Colorado.
November 5, 2014 | Concentrations of hydrogen chloride (HCl), the main reservoir of chlorine in the stratosphere, have increased by several percent over much of the Northern Hemisphere since 2007, a new study finds. The observed buildup in HCl is attributed to a temporary shift in atmospheric circulation, rather than to any increased emission of the chlorine-containing, ozone-destroying compounds that are banned by the Montreal Protocol.
Ozone concentrations above the Arctic in March 2011
February 24, 2015 | Earth’s weather extends into higher regions of the atmosphere than the one we inhabit. But the influence of those regions has been challenging to chart until recently.
Impacts of atmospheric waves: Photo of EISCAT Svalbard incoherent scatter radar
Matt Kelsch • January 28, 2014 | As this week’s blizzard rumbled toward the U.S. Northeast, many media outlets posted the top-10 snow events for major cities.
Snowfall measurement: cars buried under lots of snow