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A field study of wheat demonstrates how the nutritional quality of food crops can be diminished when elevated levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide interfere with a plant's ability to process nitrate into proteins.

Rising carbon dioxide levels harm wheat quality by interfering with the plant's ability produce proteins.

Researchers have debated for more than two decades the likely impacts, if any, of global warming on the worldwide incidence of malaria, a mosquito-borne disease that infects more than 300 million people each year.

An Anopheles gambiae mosquito, which transmits malaria in the Ethiopian highlands.

A real-time hurricane analysis and prediction system that effectively incorporates airborne Doppler radar information may accurately track the path, intensity and wind force in a hurricane, according to Penn State meteorologists.

Hurricane Sandy

Two University of Iowa researchers recently tested the ability of the world’s most advanced weather forecasting models to predict the Sept. 9-16, 2013 extreme rainfall that caused severe flooding in Boulder, Colo.

Dark blue regions that received more than 1,000 percent of their normal rainfall

Microscopic fungi that live in plants' roots play a major role in the storage and release of carbon from the soil into the atmosphere.

Mushrooms

Scientists project the Jersey Shore's sea level will rise 11 to 15 inches higher than the global average over the next century.

The amusement pier at Seaside Heights, N.J., under attack by Hurricane Sandy.

A University of Missouri researcher has found that the temperature of the Pacific Ocean could help scientists predict the type and location of tornado activity in the U.S.

Link between sea temperatures and tornadoes

A new University of Colorado Boulder study indicates drought high in the northern Colorado mountains is the primary trigger of a massive spruce beetle outbreak.

spruce beetle epidemic in Colorado

A University of Arizona-led research team has provided the first on-the-ground evidence that Southwestern plants are being pushed to higher elevations by an increasingly warmer and drier climate. 

Researchers assessing plant growth.

Should climate change trigger the upsurge in heat and rainfall that scientists predict, people may face a threat just as perilous and volatile as extreme weather — each other.

Climate-change models

The Pacific Northwest is beginning to get the type of nighttime heat waves that are routine in some other areas of the nation but historically rare in Oregon and Washington.

Sunset over the pacific

A study led by a UA ecologist has found that many species evolve too slowly to adapt to the rapid climate change expected in the next 100 years.

European Fire Salamander

A new report on sea level rise recommends that the State of Maryland should plan for a rise in sea level of as much as 2 feet by 2050.

New satellite imagery reveals that several areas across the United States are all but certain to suffer water-related catastrophes, including extreme flooding, drought and groundwater depletion.

 A drop falling into a puddle creates a crown of water.

Residents of Manhattan will not just sweat harder from rising temperatures in the future, says a new study; many may die.

Manhattan resident suffering from heat

Almost imperceptibly, rainfall over the Hawaiian Islands has been declining since 1978, and this trend is likely to continue with global warming to the end of this century.

dew drop

Billions of trees killed in the wake of mountain pine beetle infestations have not resulted in a large spike in carbon dioxide released into the atmosphere, contrary to predictions.

Forest succumbing to pine beetle outbreaks

A delay in the summer monsoon rains that fall over the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico is expected in the coming decades.

saguaro cactuses

Knowing the temperatures that viruses, bacteria, worms and all other parasites need to grow and survive could help determine the future range of infectious diseases under climate change, according to new research.

Traveling parasites

Creeping climate change in the Southwest appears to be having a negative effect on pinyon pine reproduction, a finding with implications for wildlife species sharing the same woodland ecosystems.

pinyon pine cone

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