Staff Notes Daily Calendar Events

Friday, April 29, 2016 - 6:00pm

Parent's Night Out is a great opportunity for you and your significant other to get out to dinner and a movie! By emailing the Center Director, Stephanie Ivancic, you could sign your child up from 6pm-8pm ($30 for one child or $40 for two children) or 6pm-10pm ($50 for one child and $60 for two children).

Children are welcome to wear their pajamas for a fun evening of movies and pizza! If your child has a video that he or she would like to share, bring it in. Please make sure it is labeled and let the fun begin! Siblings under the age of 7 are welcome as well.

We are inviting all UCAR employees to take advantage of this as your child does not need to be enrolled at the center to partake!

Children’s Creative Learning Center (CCLC)
Stephanie Ivancic (sivancic@cclc.com)
3050 34th Street, Boulder
http://www.cclc.com/our-centers/boulder/co/000674/

Presenter(s):
Children’s Creative Learning Center
Type of event:
Wellness/Benefits
Building:
CCLC: 3050 34th Street, Boulder
Will this event be webcast by NCAR/UCAR?
No

Posted by Laurie Carr (lcarr@ucar.edu) at x8702
Lab/division hosting the event:
UCAR
Affiliation or organization:
Tuesday, May 3, 2016 - 11:00am

It has been hypothesized that mesoscale ocean features, including here western boundary currents, have a strong influence on atmospheric synoptic variability. In addition, recent work suggests that there is co-variability between the mesoscale ocean and the atmosphere on longer timeperiods (monthly to interannual). Here we test these ideas using long (~100 year) simulations of CESM, with and without an eddy-resolving ocean model, performed during the last cycle of Accelerated Scientific Discovery. It is found that for the first case, there is a surprising regional reduction in storm track activity when the western boundary currents are resolved. This is due to changes in the absolute SST between the simulations, which affect both surface turbulent heat fluxes, and atmosphere baroclinicity. Here cooler and more realistic SST off the east coast of N. America and Japan in the eddy-resolving simulation leads to a local reduction of storm track activity there. For the second case of longer-term variability, there is enhanced atmospheric variance in a local sense, above the ocean eddy paths, and we quantify this for thermodynamic and dynamic variables. Finally, we analyze how the mesoscale air-sea interaction feeds back onto the ocean eddy activity and mean jets.

Presenter(s):
Justin Small, NCAR/CGD
Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
Mesa Lab
Room:
Main Seminar Room
Will this event be webcast by NCAR/UCAR?
Yes - ML-Main Seminar Room - http://ucarconnect.ucar.edu/live

Posted by Gaylynn Potemkin (potemkin@ucar.edu) at x1618
Lab/division hosting the event:
NCAR, CGD
Affiliation or organization:
Tuesday, May 3, 2016 - 3:30pm

Aircraft Measurements of Saharan Dust and Fluorescent Biological Particles and Implications for Ice Nucleation

Cynthia Twohy
Senior Research Scientist, NorthWest Research Associates
Visiting Researcher, Scripps Institution of Oceanography


Both mineral dust and some types of biological aerosol particles are known to nucleate ice in the atmosphere, with the potential to influence cloud microphysical properties and climate. Aircraft measurements of both types of particles were made in different meteorological regimes. The first half of the talk will focus on the interaction of Saharan dust with tropical convection over the Atlantic Ocean. In particular, we are investigating the impact of clouds on the Saharan Air Layer and how much dust is transported to the upper troposphere vs. how much is removed in precipitation. The removal and redistribution of dust by convection has important implications for direct and indirect radiative forcing, as well as for ocean biogeochemistry.


In the second half of the talk, vertical profiles of fluorescent biological aerosol particles using the Wideband Integrated Bioaerosol Sensor (WIBS-4A) will be presented. The WIBS-4A instrument was flown over the U.S. Great Plains region during the NSF IDEAS-2013 test campaign. Clear-air profiles showed a strong dependence of biological particles on altitude (or temperature), but much intra- and inter-flight variability. Some ice nuclei temperature spectra were also measured with offline analyses of filters. A preliminary assessment of the importance of biological aerosol particles for ice nucleation in mixed-phase clouds in the region will be discussed.

Seminar will be webcast at:  http://www.fin.ucar.edu/it/mms/fl-live.htm

 

Tuesday, 3 May 2016, 3:30 PM

Refreshments 3:15 PM

NCAR-Foothills Laboratory

3450 Mitchell Lane

Bldg 2 Main Auditorium (Rm1022)

Presenter(s):
Cynthia Twohy
Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
FL2
Room:
1022 - Main Auditorium
Will this event be webcast by NCAR/UCAR?

Posted by Meghan Stell (meghan@ucar.edu) at x2043
Lab/division hosting the event:
NCAR, EOL
Affiliation or organization:
Wednesday, May 4, 2016 - 3:30pm

ACOM Seminar

Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) constitutes a substantial fraction of fine particulate matter and has important impacts on climate and human health. The extent to which human activities alter SOA formation from biogenic emissions in the atmosphere is largely undetermined. The interactions of biogenic VOCs with NO3 radicals represent a direct way for positively linking anthropogenic and biogenic emissions. Here, we present direct observational evidence on the effects of anthropogenic NOx on biogenic SOA formation based on comprehensive ambient measurements in the southeastern United States and coordinated laboratory chamber studies. Multiple high-time-resolution mass spectrometry organic aerosol measurements were obtained during different seasons at various locations, including urban and rural sites in the greater Atlanta area and Centreville in rural Alabama. Experiments on nitrate radical oxidation of monoterpenes were conducted in the Georgia Tech Environmental Chamber facility (GTEC) to investigate the formation and fates of SOA and organic nitrates under conditions relevant to the southeastern US. Anthropogenic NOx is shown to enhance nighttime SOA formation via nitrate radical oxidation of monoterpenes, resulting in the ubiquitous presence of particulate organic nitrates in the southeastern US. Nighttime NO3 chemistry can contribute up to 22-34% of total measured OA in the southeastern US. Updating current modeling frameworks with these observational constraints will lead to more accurate treatment of aerosol formation for regions with substantial anthropogenic-biogenic interactions and consequently improve air quality and climate simulations. Results from these studies also illustrate the substantial insights one can gain into aerosol chemistry and ambient aerosol source apportionment through coordinated fundamental laboratory studies and field studies; it is imperative not to view laboratory studies as isolated efforts, but instead to make them essential and integrated parts of future field campaigns.

Presenter(s):
Nga Lee “Sally” Ng
Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
FL2
Room:
1022
Will this event be webcast by NCAR/UCAR?
No

Posted by Dianne Hodshon (dhodshon@ucar.edu) at x1401
Lab/division hosting the event:
NCAR, ACOM
Affiliation or organization:
Thursday, May 5, 2016 - 3:30pm

The talk introduces a global nonhydrostatic finite-volume module designed to enhance an established spectral-transform based numerical weather prediction (NWP) model. The module adheres to NWP standards, with formulation of the governing equations based on the classical meteorological latitude-longitude spherical framework. In the horizontal, a bespoke unstructured mesh with finite-volumes built about the reduced Gaussian grid of the existing NWP model circumvents the notorious stiffness in the polar regions of the spherical framework. All dependent variables are co-located, accommodating both spectral-transform and grid-point solutions at the same physical locations. In the vertical, a uniform finite-difference discretization facilitates the solution of intricate elliptic problems in thin spherical shells, while the pliancy of the physical vertical coordinate is delegated to generalize continuous transformations between computational and physical space. The newly developed module assumes the compressible Euler equations as default, but includes reduced soundproof PDEs as an option. Furthermore, it employs semi-implicit forward-in-time integrators of the governing PDE systems, akin to but more general than those used in the NWP model. The module shares the equal regions parallelization scheme with the NWP model, with multiple layers of parallelism hybridizing MPI tasks and OpenMP threads. The efficacy of the developed nonhydrostatic module is illustrated with benchmarks of idealized global weather.

Presenter(s):
Piotr Smolarkiewicz
Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
FL2
Room:
1022
Will this event be webcast by NCAR/UCAR?

Posted by Caroline Haws (haws@ucar.edu) at x8189
Lab/division hosting the event:
NCAR, MMM
Friday, May 6, 2016 - 12:00pm

Determining how precipitation, especially extreme precipitation, has and will change with warming is an important challenge in climate science. In order to accomplish this, we need to develop a robust understanding of how to quantify extreme precipitation, its change, and the associated uncertainty. But we must also address why these changes occur, and describe the physical drivers of how precipitation can change. I hope that this talk can help contribute to discussion about how to integrate physical and statistical approaches to studying precipitation extremes.

I will share some work which takes a physical approach to understanding changes in precipitation and its extremes. In the global mean, precipitation is in balance with radiative and sensible heat flux components of the atmosphere’s energy budget. Changes in global mean precipitation in climate model projections closely follow changes in clear-sky atmospheric radiative cooling, obeying an energetic constraint. Climate models vary in how heavy this rain is when it falls, but they generally agree on many aspects of how this distribution changes with warming. The changes in the distribution of rain can be described by “shift” and “increase” modes of change of the distribution. One aspect of precipitation change that models disagree about is the rate of change of extreme precipitation change with warming. These changes in extreme precipitation do not depend on the type of forcing that drives the warming (in contrast to mean precipitation). Convective organization could in principle contribute to the disagreement across models, and some methods of quantifying this relationship are in development.

Presenter(s):
Angeline Pendergrass
Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
Mesa Lab
Room:
ML 239- Damon Room
Will this event be webcast by NCAR/UCAR?
No

Posted by Kathy Peczkowicz (kathyp@ucar.edu) at x2431
Lab/division hosting the event:
NCAR, CISL, IMAGe
Monday, May 9, 2016 - 11:00am

Monday, May 9, 2016 | 11-12 Noon | FL2 - Room 1001

National Center for ATmospheric Research, Boulder

Freva – A Hybrid (Web and Shell) Software Infrastructure for Standardized Data and Tool Solutions in Earth System Science

Christopher Kadow | Research associate at the Institute of Meteorology, Freie University, Berlin

 

***************************************************************

Wouldn't it be nice ……

  • to connect a whole project or institute by a software and data sharing system?
  • to have a user friendly web environment and the power of a shell at the same time?
  • to support software developers in a framework which handles the translation into the web?
  • to find climate data easy and fast in a human readable database?
  • to aspire transparency and reproducibility via an automatic history system?
  • to have such a system at NCAR-RAL combined with the MET tools?
  • to listen to a talk about this?

This is Freva. The Free University Evaluation System Framework (freva.met.fu-berlin.de) for scientific infrastructures in Earth system modeling. Beta-Version at NCAR-RAL will be presented including first
scientific shots of MET 5.1 as a web application in climate science.

 

 This seminar will be webcasted at http://ucarconnect.ucar.edu/live

Presenter(s):
Christopher Kadow
Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
FL2
Room:
1001
Will this event be webcast by NCAR/UCAR?

Posted by Marybeth Zarlingo (zarlingo@ucar.edu) at x2751
Lab/division hosting the event:
NCAR, RAL - JNT/DTC
Affiliation or organization:
Tuesday, May 10, 2016 - 11:00am

Inadequate representation of snow in vegetation canopy is known to cause significant albedo biases in land surface models compared to satellite observations. The boreal forest in particular is the source of large discrepancies. Large variability between CMIP5 in surface albedo feedback also exists in these regions.  Previous lack of canopy snow unloading processes was contributing to overly high mid-winter albedo in CLM, and lack of explicit canopy snow storage was contributing to overly rapid spring declines. To address these issues, we incorporated a modified canopy scheme with snow interception as a prognostic variable and direct representation of snow unloading processes. The canopy radiation treatment has been updated so that optical parameters are directly related to the prognostic canopy snow storage, instead of solely temperature. With these modifications, albedo over North Hemisphere snow-affected land shows significant error reduction, particularly spring and winter, and particular in boreal evergreen dominated regions.

Presenter(s):
Justin Perket, Rutgers University
Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
Mesa Lab
Room:
Main Seminar Room
Will this event be webcast by NCAR/UCAR?
Yes - ML-Main Seminar Room - http://ucarconnect.ucar.edu/live

Posted by Gaylynn Potemkin (potemkin@ucar.edu) at x1618
Lab/division hosting the event:
NCAR, CGD
Affiliation or organization:
Friday, May 13, 2016 - 6:00pm

Parent's Night Out is a great opportunity for you and your significant other to get out to dinner and a movie! By emailing the Center Director, Stephanie Ivancic, you could sign your child up from 6pm-8pm ($30 for one child or $40 for two children) or 6pm-10pm ($50 for one child and $60 for two children).

Children are welcome to wear their pajamas for a fun evening of movies and pizza! If your child has a video that he or she would like to share, bring it in. Please make sure it is labeled and let the fun begin! Siblings under the age of 7 are welcome as well.

We are inviting all UCAR employees to take advantage of this as your child does not need to be enrolled at the center to partake!

Children’s Creative Learning Center (CCLC)
Stephanie Ivancic (sivancic@cclc.com)
3050 34th Street, Boulder
http://www.cclc.com/our-centers/boulder/co/000674/

Presenter(s):
Children’s Creative Learning Center
Type of event:
Wellness/Benefits
Building:
CCLC: 3050 34th Street, Boulder
Will this event be webcast by NCAR/UCAR?
No

Posted by Laurie Carr (lcarr@ucar.edu) at x8702
Lab/division hosting the event:
UCAR
Affiliation or organization:
Tuesday, May 17, 2016 - 11:00am

A new Pacific climate paradigm was recently proposed based on the two dominant coupled ocean-atmosphere (O–A) modes of surface variability and equatorial dynamics. These two leading modes can explain most of the North Pacific climate variability and are linked with each other. The second O–A mode reflects the footprint of the meridional variability associated with North Pacific Oscillation through the tropical–extratropical teleconnection and commonly evolves into the El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO) phase. This is confirmed by the occurrence of the warm Blob that developed after late 2013 in the northeastern Pacific, leading to the 2015 El Niño. Based on the new paradigm, a simple statistical model is derived to enhance the ENSO prediction through the evolution of the ocean heat condition and the oceanic Kelvin wave propagation associated with westerly wind events and easterly wind surges in the tropical Pacific. The hindcast skill of the proposed model is better than that based on the Warm Water Volume index in terms of the monthly correlation, normalized RMSEs and ENSO occurrences, The hindcast skill is also comparable to the predictions using other dynamical and statistical models, indicating that these processes are the keys to ENSO development.

Presenter(s):
Yu-Heng Tseng, NCAR/CGD
Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
Mesa Lab
Room:
Main Seminar Room
Will this event be webcast by NCAR/UCAR?
Yes - ML-Main Seminar Room - http://ucarconnect.ucar.edu/live

Posted by Gaylynn Potemkin (potemkin@ucar.edu) at x1618
Lab/division hosting the event:
NCAR, CGD
Affiliation or organization:
Wednesday, May 18, 2016 - 12:00pm

This study validates the near-surface temperature and precipitation output from decadal runs of eight atmospheric ocean general circulation models (AOGCMs) against observational proxy data from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction/National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCEP/NCAR) reanalysis temperatures and Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) precipitation data. We model the joint distribution of these two fields with a parsimonious bivariate Matérn spatial covariance model, accounting for the two fields' spatial cross-correlation as well as their own smoothnesses. We fit output from each AOGCM (30-year seasonal averages from 1981 to 2010) to a statistical model on each of 21 land regions. Both variance and smoothness values agree for both fields over all latitude bands except southern mid-latitudes. Our results imply that temperature fields have smaller smoothness coefficients than precipitation fields, while both have decreasing smoothness coefficients with increasing latitude. Models predict fields with smaller smoothness coefficients than observational proxy data for the tropics. The estimated spatial cross-correlations of these two fields, however, are quite different for most GCMs in mid-latitudes. Model correlation estimates agree well with those for observational proxy data for Australia, at high northern latitudes across North America, Europe and Asia, as well as across the Sahara, India, and Southeast Asia, but elsewhere, little consistent agreement exists.

This is a joint work with Robert Philbin, a graduate student in the department of statistics, Texas A&M University.

Presenter(s):
Mikyoung Jun
Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
Mesa Lab
Room:
ML- Chapman Room
Will this event be webcast by NCAR/UCAR?
No

Posted by Kathy Peczkowicz (kathyp@ucar.edu) at x2431
Lab/division hosting the event:
NCAR, CISL, IMAGe
Affiliation or organization:
Tuesday, May 24, 2016 - 11:00am

Over the past several decades, the stratosphere has been shown to play an essential role in influencing a number of aspects of the near-surface circulation and climate. For instance, the onset of the stratospheric ozone hole over Antarctica led to a poleward shift in the southern hemisphere surface westerlies, one of the few observed changes in the global circulation attributed to anthropogenic sources with any confidence by the fifth assessment report of the IPCC.

Nonetheless, there is a tendency to regard the extratropical stratosphere to a large extent as a 'passive integrator' of the forcing that arises from long wavelength, quasi-stationary Rossby waves whose behaviour is predominantly determined by tropospheric forcings. On the basis of some recent work on stratospheric sudden warmings, I will argue that in fact the stratosphere plays an important role in controlling these waves throughout the depth of the atmosphere, and that this control is in some cases the most important mechanism for the downward influence of the stratosphere.

Presenter(s):
Peter Hitchcock, Univ. of Cambridge
Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
Mesa Lab
Room:
Main Seminar Room
Will this event be webcast by NCAR/UCAR?
Yes - ML-Main Seminar Room - http://ucarconnect.ucar.edu/live

Posted by Gaylynn Potemkin (potemkin@ucar.edu) at x1618
Lab/division hosting the event:
NCAR, CGD
Affiliation or organization:
Friday, May 27, 2016 - 12:00pm

Global-scale geophysical, environmental, and climate science data sets require statistical models that explain the curvature of their spatial domain. Over the last few decades, statisticians have developed covariance models to capture their spatial and/or temporal behavior. Mathematical limitations have prevented the use of the geodesic distance, the most natural metric for measuring distance on the surface of a sphere, and instead some previous approaches have applied the Euclidean or chordal distance to approximate the covariance. However, because these approximations may result in physically unrealistic distortions on the sphere, covariance functions directly defined on the sphere using the geodesic distance are needed. We discuss the issues that arise when dealing with global-scale spherical data sets and review current geostatistical approaches. We illustrate the use of isotropic and nonstationary covariance models through deformations and geographical indicators for global surface temperature data. To assess the suitability of each method, we compare their log likelihood values and prediction score. This is a joint work with Mikyoung Jun and Marc G. Genton.

Presenter(s):
Jaehong Jeong
Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
Mesa Lab
Room:
ML- Damon Room
Will this event be webcast by NCAR/UCAR?
No

Posted by Kathy Peczkowicz (kathyp@ucar.edu) at x2431
Lab/division hosting the event:
NCAR, CISL, IMAGe
Friday, May 27, 2016 - 6:00pm

Parent's Night Out is a great opportunity for you and your significant other to get out to dinner and a movie! By emailing the Center Director, Stephanie Ivancic, you could sign your child up from 6pm-8pm ($30 for one child or $40 for two children) or 6pm-10pm ($50 for one child and $60 for two children).

Children are welcome to wear their pajamas for a fun evening of movies and pizza! If your child has a video that he or she would like to share, bring it in. Please make sure it is labeled and let the fun begin! Siblings under the age of 7 are welcome as well.

We are inviting all UCAR employees to take advantage of this as your child does not need to be enrolled at the center to partake!

Children’s Creative Learning Center (CCLC)
Stephanie Ivancic (sivancic@cclc.com)
3050 34th Street, Boulder
http://www.cclc.com/our-centers/boulder/co/000674/

Presenter(s):
Children’s Creative Learning Center
Type of event:
Wellness/Benefits
Building:
CCLC: 3050 34th Street, Boulder
Will this event be webcast by NCAR/UCAR?
No

Posted by Laurie Carr (lcarr@ucar.edu) at x8702
Lab/division hosting the event:
UCAR
Affiliation or organization:
Thursday, June 2, 2016 - 11:00am

A climate diagnostic method: covariation of

finite-amplitude wave activity and the zonal

mean flow in the mid-latitude troposphere

Lei Wang

University of Chicago

Abstract: 

Intra-seasonal atmospheric variability is a prediction gap between weather and climate predictions, and is important for skillfully predicting high-impact extreme events. Variations in jet stream are primarily driven by atmospheric waves that cannot be easily quantified by traditional linear theory. Using theory of finite-amplitude wave activity (FAWA), we develop a new zonal momentum-wave activity cycle, as a counterpart of global energy cycle (Lorenz 1955), but with several advantages for climate diagnostics. In midlatitude austral summer, the budget reveals a largely adiabatic, antiphase covariation of FAWA and the mean flow. A marked periodicity is found for FAWA around 20–30 days, consistent with the recently discovered Baroclinic Annular Mode by Thompson and collaborators. Analysis of the ERA-Interim product reveals that the 20-30 day periodicity in FAWA and eddy heat flux is robust only during the warm season. An idealized AGCM is shown to reproduce qualitatively a BAM-like eddy heat flux spectrum only if the zonal-mean state resembles that of the austral summer, which points to an important consequence of the basic state bias in climate simulations. I will also discuss the implications of this framework for the atmospheric wave variability in a changing climate. 

 Thursday, June 2, 2016

11:00 am

Mesa Lab, 1850 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, CO

ML-245-Chapman Room

For more information, please contact Teresa Foster, teresaf@ucar.edu, phone: 303-497-1741   

         The National Center for Atmospheric Research is operated by the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research under the sponsorship of the National Science Foundation

Presenter(s):
Lei Wang
Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
Mesa Lab
Room:
ML-245 - Chapman Room
Will this event be webcast by NCAR/UCAR?
No

Posted by Teresa Foster (teresaf@ucar.edu) at x1741
Lab/division hosting the event:
NCAR, CGD
Affiliation or organization:
Tuesday, June 7, 2016 - 8:45am

This 3.5 day workshop is geared towards new users of the NCAR Command Language (NCL), a scripting language for the analysis and visualization of geoscientific data. It will consist of a combination of introductory lectures and hands-on labs. During the labs, the instructors will work with students one-on-one to help them write NCL programs for analyzing their own data.

The instructors are Dennis Shea, an associate scientist in NCAR/CGD, and Mary Haley, a software engineer in NCAR/CISL.

Students are expected to have a basic knowledge of programming in one or more languages like Fortran, C, Python, IDL, or matlab, and must be comfortable working on a UNIX system.

Registration is free and limited to 16 students, so be sure to register as soon as possible. See the link below for more information.

Presenter(s):
Dennis Shea, Mary Haley
Type of event:
Workshop
Building:
CG2
Room:
3024
Will this event be webcast by NCAR/UCAR?
No

Posted by Mary Haley (haley@ucar.edu) at x1254
Lab/division hosting the event:
NCAR, CISL, TDD
Affiliation or organization:
Wednesday, June 8, 2016 - 3:00pm

Stellar Atmospheric Models

Our Sun is the only star we can observe with spatial and temporal resolution. But we can't change its mass, age, effective temperature and metallicity to study in which way these parameters affect its thermal structure and the physical processes responsible for it. On the other side, there is a great variety of stars, similar in atmospheric structure to our Sun, for which we can only obtain their spatially integrated spectra at different wavelengths. In this talk we deal with 1D solar atmospheric models as a source of stellar atmosphere models, and the results we can obtain from them.

Presenter(s):
Mariela Vieytes
Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
CG1
Room:
2126
Will this event be webcast by NCAR/UCAR?

Posted by Sheryl Shapiro (sheryls@ucar.edu) at x1567
Lab/division hosting the event:
NCAR, HAO
Affiliation or organization:
Friday, June 10, 2016 - 6:00pm

Parent's Night Out is a great opportunity for you and your significant other to get out to dinner and a movie! By emailing the Center Director, Stephanie Ivancic, you could sign your child up from 6pm-8pm ($30 for one child or $40 for two children) or 6pm-10pm ($50 for one child and $60 for two children).

Children are welcome to wear their pajamas for a fun evening of movies and pizza! If your child has a video that he or she would like to share, bring it in. Please make sure it is labeled and let the fun begin! Siblings under the age of 7 are welcome as well.

We are inviting all UCAR employees to take advantage of this as your child does not need to be enrolled at the center to partake!

Children’s Creative Learning Center (CCLC)
Stephanie Ivancic (sivancic@cclc.com)
3050 34th Street, Boulder
http://www.cclc.com/our-centers/boulder/co/000674/

Presenter(s):
Children’s Creative Learning Center
Type of event:
Wellness/Benefits
Building:
CCLC: 3050 34th Street, Boulder
Will this event be webcast by NCAR/UCAR?
No

Posted by Laurie Carr (lcarr@ucar.edu) at x8702
Lab/division hosting the event:
UCAR
Affiliation or organization:
Friday, June 17, 2016 - 3:00pm

Light appetizers and drinks are served. This is an opportunity to get out and relax with colleagues. Starts at 3:00 p.m.

Presenter(s):
None
Type of event:
Celebration
Building:
FL2
Room:
Courtyard
Will this event be webcast by NCAR/UCAR?
No

Posted by Kristen Alipit (kalipit@ucar.edu) at x1661
Lab/division hosting the event:
NCAR/UCAR-Wide Groups, EAC
Affiliation or organization:
Friday, June 24, 2016 - 6:00pm

Parent's Night Out is a great opportunity for you and your significant other to get out to dinner and a movie! By emailing the Center Director, Stephanie Ivancic, you could sign your child up from 6pm-8pm ($30 for one child or $40 for two children) or 6pm-10pm ($50 for one child and $60 for two children).

Children are welcome to wear their pajamas for a fun evening of movies and pizza! If your child has a video that he or she would like to share, bring it in. Please make sure it is labeled and let the fun begin! Siblings under the age of 7 are welcome as well.

We are inviting all UCAR employees to take advantage of this as your child does not need to be enrolled at the center to partake!

Children’s Creative Learning Center (CCLC)
Stephanie Ivancic (sivancic@cclc.com)
3050 34th Street, Boulder
http://www.cclc.com/our-centers/boulder/co/000674/

Presenter(s):
Children’s Creative Learning Center
Type of event:
Wellness/Benefits
Building:
CCLC: 3050 34th Street, Boulder
Will this event be webcast by NCAR/UCAR?
No

Posted by Laurie Carr (lcarr@ucar.edu) at x8702
Lab/division hosting the event:
UCAR
Affiliation or organization:
Monday, June 27, 2016 - 1:30pm

Overview

The 17th annual WRF Users' Workshop will take place at the NCAR's Center Green Campus, Boulder, Colorado, on 27 June to July 1, 2016

Details and the agenda will be posted at a later date.

Call for Papers

The primary objectives for the Users' Workshop are to provide WRF modeling system updates, to discuss model development and issues and to present evaluations and applications of the model. Papers focusing on development and testing of model applications in all areas are especially encouraged. This year we especially seek contributions on scale-aware physics, physics for high resolution applications and novel techiniques shch as cloud computing.

Authors are given the option of requesting either a poster or an oral presentation; however, we strongly encourage authors to consider submissions for a poster presentation, due to time constraints for oral sessions.

To submit an abstract please go to the registration page.


Other Activities at the Workshop

WRF Lecture Series: WRF Software and Best Computing Practices, Monday, June 27th, 1:30- 5PM

Three Parallel Mini-Tutorials, Friday July 1st, 8:30-10 AM: MMET, VAPOR and NCL

Presenter(s):
Multiple Presenters both internally and externally
Type of event:
Workshop
Building:
CG1
Room:
Auditorium
Will this event be webcast by NCAR/UCAR?
No

Posted by Kris Marwitz (kmarwitz@ucar.edu) at x8198
Lab/division hosting the event:
NCAR, MMM
Affiliation or organization:
Friday, July 8, 2016 - 6:00pm

Parent's Night Out is a great opportunity for you and your significant other to get out to dinner and a movie! By emailing the Center Director, Stephanie Ivancic, you could sign your child up from 6pm-8pm ($30 for one child or $40 for two children) or 6pm-10pm ($50 for one child and $60 for two children).

Children are welcome to wear their pajamas for a fun evening of movies and pizza! If your child has a video that he or she would like to share, bring it in. Please make sure it is labeled and let the fun begin! Siblings under the age of 7 are welcome as well.

We are inviting all UCAR employees to take advantage of this as your child does not need to be enrolled at the center to partake!

Children’s Creative Learning Center (CCLC)
Stephanie Ivancic (sivancic@cclc.com)
3050 34th Street, Boulder
http://www.cclc.com/our-centers/boulder/co/000674/

Presenter(s):
Children’s Creative Learning Center
Type of event:
Wellness/Benefits
Building:
CCLC: 3050 34th Street, Boulder
Will this event be webcast by NCAR/UCAR?
No

Posted by Laurie Carr (lcarr@ucar.edu) at x8702
Lab/division hosting the event:
UCAR
Affiliation or organization:
Thursday, July 14, 2016 - 8:00am

Registration is now open for the 4th Annual Engineering for Climate Extremes Workshop (on July 14, 2016).

The attached flyer and website have more information, or you can register directly at the link below.

https://www.regonline.com/Register/Checkin.aspx?EventID=1827306

The theme of this year’s meeting is “Water-Energy-People” within a context of resilience within coupled natural and social systems.

Societal and climate change, and heterogeneous resource distribution are increasingly highlighting critical vulnerabilities within the WEP system. The interplay of economic and policy drivers with social and environmental changes and climate stresses is important but largely unexplored. The workshop will highlight knowledge gaps and focus discussion on ways that ECEP can help to improve WEP system resilience.

Abstracts are invited for “Ignite” (5-minute) and longer (15-minute) presentations. Participants are welcome from all areas involved in strengthening societal resilience to weather and climate extremes.
 
Participants include representatives from Indigenous Americans, Re/insurance, Local Government, Industry and Business, and National and International Universities.

WORKSHOP VENUE: Main Seminar Room, NCAR Foothills Laboratory, 3450 Mitchell Lane, Boulder 

WORKSHOP DATES: July 14, 2016
 
WORKSHOP REGISTRATION FEE: $100 (Early Bird Registration deadline is June 14, 2016)

Beginning June 15, 2016 Registration is $150.

On-site registration $200

Presenter(s):
MMM Regional Climate Research
Type of event:
Workshop
Building:
FL2
Room:
1022 Large Auditorium
Will this event be webcast by NCAR/UCAR?
No

Posted by Kris Marwitz (kmarwitz@ucar.edu) at x8198
Lab/division hosting the event:
NCAR, MMM
Affiliation or organization:
Friday, July 15, 2016 - 3:00pm

Light appetizers and drinks are served. This is an opportunity to get out and relax with colleagues. Starts at 3:00 p.m.

Presenter(s):
None
Type of event:
Celebration
Building:
CG1
Room:
Patio
Will this event be webcast by NCAR/UCAR?
No

Posted by Kristen Alipit (kalipit@ucar.edu) at x1661
Lab/division hosting the event:
NCAR/UCAR-Wide Groups, EAC
Affiliation or organization:
Friday, July 22, 2016 - 6:00pm

Parent's Night Out is a great opportunity for you and your significant other to get out to dinner and a movie! By emailing the Center Director, Stephanie Ivancic, you could sign your child up from 6pm-8pm ($30 for one child or $40 for two children) or 6pm-10pm ($50 for one child and $60 for two children).

Children are welcome to wear their pajamas for a fun evening of movies and pizza! If your child has a video that he or she would like to share, bring it in. Please make sure it is labeled and let the fun begin! Siblings under the age of 7 are welcome as well.

We are inviting all UCAR employees to take advantage of this as your child does not need to be enrolled at the center to partake!

Children’s Creative Learning Center (CCLC)
Stephanie Ivancic (sivancic@cclc.com)
3050 34th Street, Boulder
http://www.cclc.com/our-centers/boulder/co/000674/

Presenter(s):
Children’s Creative Learning Center
Type of event:
Wellness/Benefits
Building:
CCLC: 3050 34th Street, Boulder
Will this event be webcast by NCAR/UCAR?
No

Posted by Laurie Carr (lcarr@ucar.edu) at x8702
Lab/division hosting the event:
UCAR
Affiliation or organization:
Monday, July 25, 2016 - 8:30am
TUTORIAL OVERVIEW 

 The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model Tutorial will be offered from 25 July- 3 August 2016 at the NCAR Foothills Laboratory, Boulder, Colorado.

The Basic tutorial will consist of lectures on various components of the WRF modeling system along with hands-on practice sessions. The topics include:

  1. WRF Pre-processing System
  2. WRF Dynamics and Numerics
  3. WRF Physics
  4. WRF Software Framework
  5. WRF Post-processing and Graphical Tools

The WRFDA tutorial will include lectures on a variety of topics on the full capability of the WRFDA system, along with hands-on practice sessions. The topics covered will include:

  1. Observation types, formats, and preprocessing
  2. Background error modeling and estimation
  3. 3D- and 4D-Variational data assimilation
  4. Ensemble and Hybrid Variational-Ensemble data assimilation methods
  5. Cycling with WRF and WRFDA
  6. Visualization and verification tools
  7. Guidance for code developers and new observation types

REQUIREMENTS

Basic knowledge of atmospheric science and numerical modeling, as well as working in a Unix computer environment, is required for the class. WRF Tutorial participants are strongly encouraged to work through the WRF-ARW online tutorial, especially if you have not used the model before. Walking through the online tutorial will provide an overview of the system, which can help enhance your learning experience once you are here (even if you cannot compile and run the code physically). If you run into any problems while working through this, feel free to contact "wrfhelp at ucar dot edu".

All participants are also strongly encouraged to get familiar with Unix/Linux working environment, as working through directories, editing text files and Fortran code are absolutely essential to operate the modeling system programs. One can easily find Unix tutorials for beginners online for this purpose.

 
Presenter(s):
Multiple members of MMM Staff
Type of event:
Tutorial/Training
Building:
FL2
Room:
1002 - Large Auditorium
Will this event be webcast by NCAR/UCAR?
No

Posted by Kris Marwitz (kmarwitz@ucar.edu) at x8198
Lab/division hosting the event:
NCAR, MMM
Affiliation or organization: