Staff Notes Daily Calendar Events

Wednesday, August 5, 2015 - 9:00am

The Graduate School of Mathematics at Nagoya University Japan hosted a meeting on turbulence in 2014 entitled, "Fundamental Aspects of Geophysical Turbulence."  The workshop touched on turbulence in the atmosphere, the ocean, and the sun and covered a broad range of scales, topics, and approaches.  See the following link for more information:  http://www2.mmm.ucar.edu/people/sullivan/talks/gtp2/
The meeting environment was casual, interactive, and stimulating - attendees and organizers completely enjoyed the event. Thus, we wish to continue the dialogue at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), in Boulder, CO in the summer of 2015. 

Presenter(s):
MMM Staff
Type of event:
Workshop
Building:
Mesa Lab
Room:
Damon Room
Will this event be webcast by NCAR/UCAR?
No

Posted by Kris Marwitz (kmarwitz@ucar.edu) at x8198
Lab/division hosting the event:
NCAR, MMM
Affiliation or organization:
Wednesday, August 5, 2015 - 3:00pm

Acceleration and heating of the fast solar wind: Waves, turbulence, and kinetic instabilities

The acceleration of the fast solar wind to ~1000 km/s involve large (MHD) scale as well as kinetic scale processes, and is not fully understood. Past observations show that the fast solar wind flow is nearly steady at 1AU, and associated with high level of magnetic fluctuations, Alfvenic turbulence, and kinetic properties that results from instabilities. The velocity distribution of the ions is often non-Maxwellian, with anisotropic temperature, differential streaming, and evidence of beams. I will review some of the observations, and present the results of hybrid modeling studies that recover important observed properties of the fast solar wind plasma. I will show the effects of kinetic instabilities and turbulent wave spectra leading to the heating of the solar wind ions. I will present the results of recent studies of inhomogenous solar wind plasma heating close to the Sun by turbulent Alfven/ion cyclotron wave spectrum, and acceleration resulting from parametric instability of large amplitude Alfven waves. I will discuss the relation of the modeling results to recent ACE/Wind satellite observations, as well as upcoming Solar Probe Plus and the Solar Orbiter missions.

Webcast: https://ucarconnect.ucar.edu/live?room=cg12126

Presenter(s):
Leon Ofman
Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
CG1
Room:
2126
Will this event be webcast by NCAR/UCAR?

Posted by Sheryl Shapiro (sheryls@ucar.edu) at x1567
Lab/division hosting the event:
NCAR, HAO
Affiliation or organization:
Monday, August 10, 2015 - 3:00pm

Please join us for a seminar given by our four SUPER interns as they present the projects they have been working on this summer. 

Katie McMenamin 

EOL ISS utilizes a 449 MHz modular wind profiler, a scalable radar system that profiles the wind and structure of the atmospheric boundary layer and troposphere. One of the important building blocks of this radar system is a high power amplifier that receives a pulsed radio frequency signal and increases its power before being emitted by the system. In the design process of the amplifier, a series of nine tests must be run on the amplifier to characterize its performance before being implemented in the radar system. These tests simulate possible real-life scenarios to determine how the amplifier will perform in different situations. When these tests are conducted manually, it takes approximately two weeks to complete.

This presentation will cover the automation of the series of high power amplifier tests. LabVIEW software was designed in order to automate each of the nine tests, which decreases the amount of time needed to test, eliminates the need for a person to test the amplifiers, and increases quality and repeatability of test results.

Hien Nguyen

EOL field projects generate a large amount of raw data everyday that needs to be processed into graphical visualization for analysis. This process is inconvenient because it requires a significant amount of time for a detailed graph to be constructed. It is desired to have a quick and simple look at the data after it is collected. My project at EOL during the summer is to design and develop Ncharts, which is python django server based website that can plot the raw data into interactive graphs and update them in real time basis. All current EOL projects can be accessed on Ncharts and the software provides different graphical interfaces for different types of data. This project will reduce the amount of time needed to process the results and view them in a simple manner.

Lucas Reed

EOL, ISF has a variety of low power field sensors that require a reliable power source. Often in remote areas, these sensors don’t have access to a power outlet or other preexisting infrastructure. The remote sensors being targeted with this project are often in the open and can utilize solar power.

To effectively power remote field sensors and to improve on the current power system, a PCB is being designed, built, tested, and implemented. It is being designed to accept and maximize solar power, handle energy storage, and output a steady 12V, low power signal for the sensor. It is intended to fit in a small and light package that will be easy to deploy in the field.

The final product will effectively and efficiently power a variety of EOL ISF’s remote field sensors as well as provide the intern with valuable experience. 

Scott Hally

EOL ISS utilizes a 449 MHz modular wind profiler, a scalable radar system that profiles the wind and structure of the atmospheric boundary layer and troposphere. One of the important building blocks of this radar system is a high power amplifier that receives a pulsed radio frequency signal and increases its power before being emitted by the system. In the design process of the amplifier, a series of nine tests must be run on the amplifier to characterize its performance before being implemented in the radar system. These tests simulate possible real-life scenarios to determine how the amplifier will perform in different situations. When these tests are conducted manually, it takes approximately two weeks to complete.

This presentation will cover the automation of the series of high power amplifier tests. LabVIEW software was designed in order to automate each of the nine tests, which decreases the amount of time needed to test, eliminates the need for a person to test the amplifiers, and increases quality and repeatability of test results. 

Monday August 10, 2015
FL1-2198 EOL Atrium
3:00pm – 4:30pm
Refreshments Served at 2:45

 

 

 

Presenter(s):
SUPER Interns - Katie McMenamin, Hien Nguyen, Scott Hally, Lucas Reed
Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
FL1
Room:
2198 EOL Atrium
Will this event be webcast by NCAR/UCAR?
No

Posted by Meghan Stell (meghan@ucar.edu) at x2043
Lab/division hosting the event:
NCAR, ASP/EOL
Affiliation or organization:
Tuesday, August 11, 2015 - 9:00am

August 11 - 14, 2015
NCAR Facility
3450 Mitchell Lane, Boulder, Colorado

GSI & EnKF - Starting Tuesday Morning on August 11 - 14, 2015
EnKF Only  - Starting Thursday Afternoon on August 13 - 14, 2015
                  GSI knowledge is required for the EnKF Only Session

The combined Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation and Ensemble Kalman Filter (GSI/EnKF) Community Data Assimilation System Tutorial will be offered at the NCAR Foothills Laboratory, in Boulder, Colorado on August 11-14, 2015. This will be the sixth Community GSI tutorial, but the first time EnKF will be included.

GSI is the operational data assimilation (DA) system being used by various national operational and research centers, including NOAA and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). It is traditionally a three-dimensional variational DA system and has been extended to run with advanced features, including the hybrid ensemble-variational data assimilation technique and the four dimensional EnVAR technique.

The EnKF system is a Monte-Carlo algorithm for data assimilation that uses an ensemble of short-term forecasts to estimate the background-error covariance in the Kalman Filter. The EnKF uses the observation operators in the GSI system to transform model variables to observed variables in observation space. Therefore, the types of observations available for use in the EnKF match those for the GSI. Currently this EnKF is running operationally as part of the GSI based hybrid data assimilation system for the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) global applications.

The combined GSI/EnKF Community Tutorial will be held over the four days of August 11-14. The GSI/EnKF tutorial will consist of both lectures and hands-on practical exercises. The lecturers are invited from various GSI and EnKF development/support teams including NCEP/EMC, NASA/GMAO, NOAA/GSD, NCAR/MMM and DTC. The practical sessions will provide the necessary skills to run both the GSI and EnKF systems for both basic and advanced implementations. The tutorial will be tailored to the upcoming release code (GSI and EnKF) scheduled for June, 2015

The tutorial consists of a combination of classroom lectures and a hands on practical session. We offer a choice of two registration options:

    Full GSI/EnKF Tutorial (4 days): $400 (includes lunch and refreshments)
    EnKF Only Tutorial (1.5 days): $130 (includes lunch and refreshments)

There will be NO refunds for cancellations made on, or after 3 PM MT on Friday July 31th, 2015. Prior to the July 31th deadline, we will refund the registration fee, less $25.00 to cover administrative costs.

To register use the link to reg-on-line (https://www.regonline.com/2015gsicommunitytutorialcopycopy) - More information can be found at the tutorial webpage (http://www.dtcenter.org/com-GSI/users/tutorials/2015.php)

If you have any questions or are unable to register please e-mail: MaryBeth Zarlingo (zarlingo@ucar.edu)
    
    - Due to seating limitations, the registration is limited to 40 participants.
    - 31 July, 2015: Last day to register if you need a temporary account on NCAR's Yellowstone computer for the hands on practical exercises.
    - Before 3 PM MT on Friday 31 July 2015, we will refund your registration fee less $25.00 to cover administrative fees.
    - After 31 July 2015, there will be no refunds.

We are looking forward to your attendance!

Presenter(s):
Dr. Hui Shao
Type of event:
Tutorial/Training
Building:
FL2
Room:
1022
Will this event be webcast by NCAR/UCAR?
No

Posted by Marybeth Zarlingo (zarlingo@ucar.edu) at x2751
Lab/division hosting the event:
NCAR
Affiliation or organization:
Tuesday, August 11, 2015 - 3:30pm

Teruyuki Nakajima
JAXA/EORC

The last two decades were a great period of significant progress in satellite remote sensing of the microphysical characteristics of clouds and aerosols.  NOAA AVHRR, EOS MODIS and ESSP CLOUDSAT&CALIPSO are among those sensors that contributed to this progress. I would like to give an overview of the progress by taking several useful microphysical parameters of the atmospheric particulate matter for evaluating the magnitude of the direct and indirect climate effects of aerosols, of which estimate still has a large uncertainties. Combined use of climate models is also an important element to solving this difficult jigsaw puzzle. I will introduce some effort of developing non-hydrostatic atmospheric models for simulating the aerosol and cloud microphysical fields.

Tuesday, 11 August 2015, 3:30 PM
Refreshments 3:15 PM
NCAR-Foothills Laboratory
3450 Mitchell Lane
Bldg 2 Small Seminar (Rm1001)

Seminar will be webcast at http://www.fin.ucar.edu/it/mms/fl2-live.htm

EOL SEMINAR COORDINATORS: Steve Oncley and Stuart Beaton oncley@ucar.edu,beaton@ucar.edu https://www.eol.ucar.edu/workshops-seminars

Presenter(s):
Teruyuki Nakajima
Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
FL2
Room:
1001- Small Seminar Room
Will this event be webcast by NCAR/UCAR?

Posted by Meghan Stell (meghan@ucar.edu) at x2043
Lab/division hosting the event:
NCAR, ASP/EOL
Affiliation or organization:
Thursday, August 13, 2015 - 3:30pm

Fanglin Yang
IMSG at Environmental Modeling Center
National Centers for Environmental Prediction
College Park, MD

The Global Forecast Systems (GFS) is the cornerstone of NCEP’s operational numerical weather forecast suite. This presentation will first review GFS development history and its forecast skills in the past few decades, with a focus on its recent performance. Major changes in GFS dynamics, physics and data assimilation schemes and significant improvements in GFS forecast skills in the past will be highlighted. The evaluation includes forecast skills of atmospheric large-scale flow pattern, precipitation and hurricane track and intensity. The performance of GFS will be compared with other international NWP models. The second part of this presentation will describe the development of GFS forecast evaluation tools. A portable NWP model verification package has been developed in recent years. It is now widely used by modelers and forecasters at NCEP and the community. Recent effort is focused on the evaluation of surface weather sensible elements and on the application of object-oriented verification methods. At the end, major issues and near-future development of the GFS and requirements for more advanced model evaluation tools will be discussed.

This seminar will be webcast live at:
http://www.fin.ucar.edu/it/mms/fl-live.htm

Recorded seminar link can be viewed here:
https://www.mmm.ucar.edu/events/seminars

Thursday, 13 August 2015, 3:30 PM
Refreshments 3:15 PM
NCAR-Foothills Laboratory
3450 Mitchell Lane
Bldg 2 Main Auditorium, Room 1022

Presenter(s):
Fanglin Yang
Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
FL2
Room:
1022
Will this event be webcast by NCAR/UCAR?

Posted by Michelle Menard (menard@ucar.edu) at x8189
Lab/division hosting the event:
NCAR, MMM
Affiliation or organization:
Wednesday, August 19, 2015 - 8:30am

The Engineering for Climate Extremes Partnership (ECEP) is a collaboration between Industry, Commerce, Society, Academia and Government facilitated by NCAR with the goal of developing robust, well-communicated predictions and advice on the impacts of weather and climate extremes to support robust/resilient decision-making. (www.ecep.ucar.edu)

Please join us at a  Workshop for the Engineering for Climate Extremes Partnership, to be held at NCAR, Boulder, Colorado on August 19-21 2015

Overview

ECEP arose out of a series of cross-disciplinary meetings and was formally launched in late 2014. The aim of this year’s meeting is to review the first year of the Partnership, and to identify future strategic directions.

The workshop will provide the opportunity for community members to share best practice and to feedback their priorities for research and information needs to facilitate decisions and to enhance community resilience to weather and climate extremes. Posters are invited, and several will be selected for oral presentation.

Participants include representatives from Indigenous Americans, Re/insurance, Local Government, Industry and Business, and National and International Universities.

Presenter(s):
MMM Staff
Type of event:
Workshop
Building:
Foothills Labs
Room:
1022
Will this event be webcast by NCAR/UCAR?
No

Posted by Kris Marwitz (kmarwitz@ucar.edu) at x8198
Lab/division hosting the event:
NCAR, MMM
Affiliation or organization:
Wednesday, August 19, 2015 - 3:00pm

Magnetic influences on the solar wind: A study of turbulent heating in open flux tubes

Many decades after the existence of the solar corona was confirmed, the solar physics community remains without consensus on which heating mechanisms are responsible for the orders-of-magnitude jump from the 6000 K photosphere to the 1-2 million K corona. In that time, however, we have come to understand that the generation and acceleration of the constant outflow from the Sun, the solar wind, is intricately tied to the heating of the corona. I present a parameter study of the relation between the time-steady solar wind and the magnetic field in flux tubes open to the heliosphere (Woolsey & Cranmer 2014). I also describe newer results modeling Alfven waves in time-dependent, three-dimensional flux tubes, which show transient, nanoflare-like heating in the corona. I discuss how this bursty heating relates to observations of the transition region made with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS), and present comparison of IRIS observations with magnetic field data from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager aboard SDO.

Presenter(s):
Lauren Woolsey
Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
CG1
Room:
2126
Will this event be webcast by NCAR/UCAR?

Posted by Sheryl Shapiro (sheryls@ucar.edu) at x1567
Lab/division hosting the event:
NCAR, HAO
Affiliation or organization: