Staff Notes Daily Calendar Events

Thursday, September 18, 2014 - 10:30am

Date:    September 18, 2014
Time:    10:30am
Place:    FL2 Room 1001

Peter M. Blasco, Jose Palacios, and Sven Schmitz
Department of Aerospace Engineering
The Pennsylvania State University

Wind energy is the fastest growing form of renewable energy. One of the many challenges wind energy faces in today’s competitive energy market is due to performance losses associated with atmospheric icing events that are commonly experienced by wind turbines in the Northern United States. It is therefore imperative to develop accurate prediction methods that determine the power losses due to atmospheric icing events. Representative icing conditions can be generated at the Penn State Adverse Environment Rotor Test Stand (AERTS). A technique has been developed where the actual ice shapes can be molded and preserved for subsequent wind-tunnel testing. In collaboration with NCAR and Xcel Energy, the Penn State team has performed scaled ice accretion experiments in the AERTS facility representative of spanwise flow conditions along a notional 1.5-MW wind turbine blade. Wind-tunnel measurements of lift and drag of various iced airfoil shapes were performed and used to estimate the total power losses due to turbine icing for selected atmospheric icing conditions. This seminar highlights the ice accretion experiments and wind-tunnel tests performed at Penn State and discusses some of the implications that the results suggest for predicting performance losses due to icing as well as alleviating the former by means of advanced turbine controls.

Peter M. Blasco  -  Peter is a 2nd-year M.S. student in Aerospace Engineering at Penn State where he also completed his B.S. in 2013. Peter’s thesis research focuses on wind turbine icing where he is conducting scaled ice accretion experiments and wind-tunnel tests. Furthermore, Peter is thinking of novel ways for advanced turbine controls that can mitigate the adverse effects associated with turbine icing. In his spare time, he likes to hike, camp, rock climb, snowboard, and do plenty of other outdoor activities. He also enjoys to design, build, and fly radio-controlled aircraft and rotorcraft.

Dr. Jose Palacios  -  Dr. Jose Palacios joined the faculty of Aerospace Engineering at Penn State University in August 2013. Jose received his bachelor, MS and PhD in Aerospace Engineering from the same department and school. He spent 5 years as a post-doctoral researcher at the Penn State Vertical Lift Research Center of Excellence (VLRCOE). During that time, his main research focus has been aircraft and wind turbine icing. Jose has developed testing capabilities to investigate icing physics and methods to prevent ice accretion. The construction of an Adverse Environment Rotor Test Stand (AERTS) and an upcoming Ice Crystal Wind Tunnel have helped secure funds for on-going research in the field of rotorcraft icing physics, engine icing, de-icing systems, and ice protective coatings.

Dr. Sven Schmitz  -  Dr. Sven Schmitz joined the faculty of Aerospace Engineering at Penn State University in 2010. He received a diploma degree in Aerospace Engineering from RWTH Aachen (Germany) in 2002 and a Ph.D. in Mechanical and Aeronautical Engineering from the University of California Davis in 2006. Sven spent four years as a post-doctoral researcher and project scientist at Davis before coming to Penn State. He is an expert in rotary wing aerodynamics with an emphasis on vortical flows. His growing research program embraces the areas of wind turbine aerodynamics and rotorcraft aeromechanics. Current activities include wind farm wake modeling, icing on wind turbines, rotor hub flows, and rotor active control.

This seminar will be Webcast - Webcast link
http://www.fin.ucar.edu/it/mms/fl-live.htm

Presenter(s):
Peter M. Blasco, Jose Palacios, and Sven Schmitz
Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
FL2
Room:
1001

Posted by Marybeth Zarlingo (zarlingo@ucar.edu) at x2751
Lab/division hosting the event:
NCAR, RAL
Affiliation or organization:
Tuesday, September 16, 2014 - 1:30pm, Wednesday, September 17, 2014 - 1:30pm, Thursday, September 18, 2014 - 1:30pm

The HAO Director Search Committee invites NCAR and UCAR staff to attend a series of presentations given by three candidates for the position. The candidates will each give a 45-minute presentation, and will conduct a 30-minute Q&A session with the audience afterward. The events will be webcast live from the FL2 Small Seminar Room (Room 1001) starting at 1:30 PM MDT (http://www.fin.ucar.edu/it/mms/fl2-live.htm) on the following days and will also be recorded for later viewing:

September 16 - 1:30 PM MDT: Dr. Stanley Solomon (HAO)

Solar Variability and Anthropogenic Change in the Upper Atmosphere

September 17 - 1:30 PM MDT: Dr. Sarah Gibson (HAO)

Magnetism Across Time and Space: Seeking the Spheres to Connect Them

September 18 - 1:30 PM MDT: Dr. Scott McIntosh (HAO)

The Sun-Earth Connection: New Pathways to Bridging the Ninety-Three Million Mile Gap

Presenter(s):
Stanley Solomon, Sarah Gibson, Scott McIntosh
Type of event:
No event type category
Building:
FL2
Room:
1001 Small Seminar Room

Posted by Whitney Robinson (wrobs@ucar.edu) at x8713
Lab/division hosting the event:
NCAR, HAO
Affiliation or organization:
Thursday, September 18, 2014 - 2:00pm

The first UCAR Ed Group meeting for 2014-2015 will be held on September 18, 2014 from 2:00 - 3:30pm in the GLOBE conference room (FL4-2101).  At this meeting, we will hear from Eileen Carpenter and Marc Mueller of UCAR Sci Ed.  They will discuss their experiences with the National Network for Ocean and Climate Change Interpretation (NNOCCI).  Additionally, we will discuss topics for the upcoming year. 

If you are unable to attend but would like future updates about the UCAR Ed Group, send an email to edgroup-join@ucar.edu to join the list. 

Presenter(s):
Eileen Carpenter, Marc Mueller
Type of event:
No event type category
Building:
FL4
Room:
2101

Posted by Julie Malmberg (malmberg@ucar.edu) at x2649
Lab/division hosting the event:
UCAR Community Programs, The GLOBE Program
Thursday, September 18, 2014 - 3:30pm

Can coherant continuous-wave doppler lidars be utilized for in-situ instrument calibration?

Ebba Dellwik & Jakob Mann
DTU Wind Energy, Denmark

Three continuous-wave, infrared, coherent Doppler lidars with acousto-optical modulators, which allow the determination of both the sign and the magnitude of the wind speed, were accurately positioned and aligned to measure the flow inside and near a CSAT3 sonic anemometer (Campbell Scientific) measurement volume. The measurement height was 6 m, and the focus distance of the three lidars was 8 m giving a full-width half-maximum of the lidar measurement volume of approximately 9 cm, which is comparable to the path length of the sonic anemometer (11.5 cm). Both systems were sampled at 60 Hz. The goal of the experiment was to quantify the systematic flow distortion caused by the structure of the sonic anemometer for which the lidar technique could offer a novel way of calibration. We present a comparison between sonic and lidar data as a function of wind direction and attack angle.

One short-coming with the acousto-optical modulators is the inability to measure close to zero wind speed. An alternative receiver architecture, in which the received backscatter signal is split into two parts and one part is delayed a quarter of a wavelength relative to the other, was therefore implemented. In order to test the new receiver, the lidar was pointed vertically to obtain near-zero speeds and measured close to a sonic anemometer. We present the data from the field experiment and discuss the observed differences between sonic and lidar data. 

Thursday, 18 September 2014, 3:30PM
NCAR-Foothills Laboratory
3450 Mitchell Lane
Bldg. 2 Large Auditorium (Rm 1022)

Presenter(s):
Ebba Dellwik & Jakob Mann
Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
FL2
Room:
1022 (Large Auditorium)

Posted by Whitney Robinson (wrobs@ucar.edu) at x8713
Lab/division hosting the event:
NCAR, EOL
Affiliation or organization:
Friday, September 19, 2014 - 10:00am

Nicholas J. Wright, Ph.D., NERSC 
https://www.nersc.gov/about/nersc-staff/advanced-technologies-group/nicholas-wright/

Abstract:

The National Energy Research Scientific Computing (NERSC) Center is the high-end scientific production computing facility for the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Science (SC). NERSC provides large-scale, state-of-the-art computing, storage, and networking for more than 4,500 users that encompass the DOE’s unclassified research programs in many science areas. With the coming changes in computer architecture, it is essential that NERSC works to ensure that its users remain productive by preparing them for advanced many-core architectures. In this talk we describe our strategy for doing so, and will introduce NERSC's next supercomputer, Cori, a Cray XC system featuring the Intel Knights Landing Architecture.

Presenter(s):
Nick Wright, Ph.D.
Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
Mesa Lab
Room:
Main Seminar Room

Posted by Jennifer Williamson (jnif@ucar.edu) at x1224
Lab/division hosting the event:
NCAR, CISL, TDD
Affiliation or organization:
Monday, September 22, 2014 - 2:00pm

Hydrology is the science of water: in the ground, running over the ground, and in the air. Like any fluid, the flow of water in its various forms, is heavily dependent on statistics, and I was extraordinarily lucky to have made the acquaintance of NCAR senior scientist Rick Katz very early in my career. I will present a brief overview of our joint research, which spans two and a half decades, three continents, and five institutions:  In North America, we studied rainfall patterns in California and Colorado. In Europe, we concentrated on the Alps, analyzing spatial turbulence measurements taken over the Plaine Morte glacier in the context of studying sub-grid scale processes for Large Eddy Simulation, as well as the hydrology of the Val Ferret watershed and new ideas of river discharge measurement.  From there we moved to the hydrology of West Africa (Burkina Faso) and the dynamics controlling the diurnal discharge patterns of ephemeral streams. The success of our shared scientific endeavor is thanks to an enduring friendship based on a mutual love of the environment, the outdoors, and running. We have been fortunate to pursue our scientific and athletic interests in some of the world’s most beautiful places, and we pass this on to the next generation of hydrologists as a model of cross-disciplinary collaboration

Presenter(s):
Marc Parlange
Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
Mesa Lab
Room:
Main Seminar Room

Posted by Carolyn Mueller (cmueller@ucar.edu) at x2491
Lab/division hosting the event:
NCAR, CISL, IMAGe
Affiliation or organization:
Tuesday, September 23, 2014 - 11:00am

With growing interest in extracting renewable forms of energy, marine hydrokinetic energy from waves, tides, and ocean currents is increasing in favor. Tidal energy conversation is of particular interest in the Puget Sound, WA where narrow channels and large tidal ranges have the ability to produce more than 0.6 terawatt-hours per year of extractable power. However, a better understanding of the marine environment is necessary to make further progress in research and development of these new technologies. Turbulence, in particular, is both extremely impactful and difficult to observe and predict. Observations are crucial for understanding the turbulent environments that prospective turbines will encounter, but limited observing capabilities require additional information from numerical models. First, data from an acoustic Doppler velocimeter are used to perform a detailed characterization of the turbulent flow at Nodule Point in the Puget Sound, including anisotropy, intermittency, and coherence. Beyond the limited single-point observations, two foundationally different numerical models are analyzed for their ability to create realistic tidal turbulence. A stochastic turbulence generator, NREL’s HydroTurbSim, and large-eddy simulations (solving the wind-, wave-, and tidally-forced, wave-averaged Boussinesq equations) are compared to the observations from Nodule Point, focusing on anisotropy and coherence to physically characterize the turbulent features of the tidal strait.

Presenter(s):
Katherine McCaffrey
Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
Mesa Lab
Room:
Main Seminar Room

Posted by Gaylynn Potemkin (potemkin@ucar.edu) at x1618
Lab/division hosting the event:
NCAR, NESL, CGD
Affiliation or organization:
Tuesday, September 23, 2014 - 2:00pm

IPCC Chapter 5:  Information from Paleoclimate Archives

Presenter(s):
Bette Otto-Bliesner
Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
CIRES Auditorium at CU-Boulder

Posted by Gaylynn Potemkin (potemkin@ucar.edu) at x1618
Lab/division hosting the event:
External:, CIRES-ATOC
Affiliation or organization:
Tuesday, September 23, 2014 - 3:30pm

Airborne radar observations of tropical cyclone eyewalls

Annette Foerster
Department of Atmospheric Sciences
University of Hawaii at Manoa

Observing the structure of tropical cyclone eyewalls is an essential step in understanding the physical mechanisms that determine intensity and structure change. The eyewall convection of tropical cyclones is influenced by the environment, but the convection also influences the larger scale flow.  Environmental factors such as vertical wind shear determine the azimuthal location of the strongest convection, while the location and timing of the eyewall convection impact the storm’s intensification efficiency.  Airborne radars collect three-dimensional high-resolution precipitation and wind data, thus they are very well suited to give insight into the eyewall structure. This presentation will show analyses of radar, dropsonde, and aircraft data from two different tropical cyclones, Typhoon Sinlaku (2008) and Hurricane Rita (2005).

Typhoon Sinlaku is investigated at a late stage of its lifecycle, located poleward and undergoing extratropical transition. It will be shown that the storm structure is very similar to tropical cases where vertical wind shear is the primary factor impacting the location and character of the eyewall convection. However, some significant differences to the tropical cases will also be presented. Hurricane Rita is investigated to study the role of buoyancy in the eyewall during rapid intensification. There have been a few modeling studies that investigated the role of buoyancy, but so far only one observational study using flight level data has been conducted. A modified thermodynamic retrieval to estimate buoyancy from radar data will be presented, along with some preliminary results for Hurricane Rita.

Tuesday, 23 September 2014, 3:30PM
NCAR-Foothills Laboratory
3450 Mitchell Lane
Bldg. 2 Large Auditorium (Rm 1022)

Presenter(s):
Annette Foerster
Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
Foothills Labs
Room:
1022 (Large Auditorium)

Posted by Whitney Robinson (wrobs@ucar.edu) at x8713
Lab/division hosting the event:
NCAR, EOL
Affiliation or organization:
Wednesday, September 24, 2014 - 11:00am

Solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation energizes atmospheric photo-chemistry by generating highly reactive molecular fragments, the hydroxyl radicals (OH). These OH radicals are effective cleaning agents of the atmosphere as they oxidize many reduced compounds emitted by the biosphere and its humans.  The greenhouse gas methane (CH4) is one of these compounds, and its atmospheric mixing ratio has tripled in the last 200 years, having been nearly constant for the previous ½ million.  The reaction OH+CH4->CH3+H2O limits the atmospheric residence time of CH4 to about 10 years, but with a range of 7-14 years predicted by different models.  The strength of this cleaning mechanism is limited and is only effective if the emissions of species to be removed (e.g. CO, CH4) do not exceed certain thresholds, beyond which OH would fall to low values and allow CH4 runaway with catastrophic consequences for climate. Catalytic regeneration of OH by nitrogen oxides (NOx) appears key to maintaining a vigorous oxidative capacity.  Natural sources of NOx, mostly from lightning, soils, and forest fires, probably already had a key role in preventing CH4 runaways over geological history.  A tripling of NOx emissions since pre-industrial times likely increased OH further, while concurrent increases in CH4 (as well as CO and other hydrocarbons) should have suppressed it – with the net change in OH uncertain to the present and into the future.  Models should be evaluated with both local (in-situ) and global (satellite) observations and used to simulate future OH for different scenarios, e.g., where NOx emissions decrease while those of CH4 continue to rise.

Presenter(s):
Sasha Madronich
Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
FL2
Room:
1022

Posted by Scott Briggs (sbriggs@ucar.edu) at x1607
Lab/division hosting the event:
NCAR, NCAR Director's Office, ASP
Affiliation or organization:
Monday, September 29, 2014 - 2:00pm

Dynamics and predictability of atmospheric low-frequency variability (LFV) are examined in the framework of a low-dimensional stochastic differential equation on the phase space spanned by leading empirical orthogonal function modes of atmospheric LFV.  A solution of the linearized equation of non-stationary fluctuation-dissipation relation (FDR) based on the deterministic drift vector and the stochastic diffusion tensor estimated from a reanalysis dataset developed in this study mostly corresponds to the 1-month ensemble prediction operationally conducted by the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) projected onto the phase space. Another example of Lorenz model or Rossler chaos model will be shown.

Presenter(s):
Masaru Inatsu, Naoto Nakano & Hitoshi Mukougawa
Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
Mesa Lab
Room:
Damon room

Posted by Michelle McCambridge (mmccamb@ucar.edu) at x1741
Lab/division hosting the event:
NCAR, CGD
Monday, September 29, 2014 - 3:30pm

Professor Alan J. Thorpe
Director-General of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF)
Reading, United Kingdom

Global numerical weather prediction (NWP) has been a crowning glory of the huge advances in weather science in the last 50 years. Observations from space, data assimilation, computing technology, physical process understanding, the theory of chaos and ensemble prediction are among the major innovations that have revolutionised the field. Reflecting on this scientific progress, in this talk we will paint a picture of what this endeavour could achieve in the next 50 years. International collaboration has been and will continue to be key to making further advances. NWP is at the cusp of evolving into numerical environmental prediction and weather and climate science must fully integrate if societal challenges resulting from natural hazards and climate change are to be addressed.

This seminar will be recorded and available via webcast at:
http://www.fin.ucar.edu/it/mms/fl-live.htm

**Please note this special day**
Monday, 29 September 2014, 3:30 PM
Refreshments 3:15 PM
NCAR-Foothills Laboratory
3450 Mitchell Lane
Bldg 2 Main Auditorium, Room 1022

Presenter(s):
Alan J. Thorpe
Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
FL2
Room:
1022

Posted by Michelle Menard (menard@ucar.edu) at x8189
Lab/division hosting the event:
NCAR, NESL, MMM
Tuesday, September 30, 2014 - 11:00am

Stratospheric water vapor and tropical cirrus clouds are controlled by temperatures near the cold point tropical tropopause, but tropopause variability is poorly understood from both theory and observations. We examine the behavior of tropical temperatures based on high quality, high vertical resolution GPS temperature measurements covering 2001-2013, with focus on behavior of the tropopause region and coupling with the upper troposphere and stratosphere. Tropical stratospheric temperatures exhibit two dominant modes of variability, a ‘deep stratosphere mode’ tied to high latitude planetary wave forcing, and a shallow ‘near tropopause mode’ closely linked to upwelling near the tropopause. These data provide further evidence of distinct upper and lower branches of the stratospheric Brewer-Dobson circulation. Temperatures in the lower stratosphere are most strongly coupled to the upper troposphere on time scales of ~30-60 days, associated with the Madden-Julian oscillation. Enhanced temperature variance near the tropopause is linked with the long radiative relaxation time scales in the lower stratosphere, which makes this region especially sensitive to low frequency forcing. 

Presenter(s):
Bill Randel
Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
Mesa Lab
Room:
Main Seminar Room

Posted by Gaylynn Potemkin (potemkin@ucar.edu) at x1618
Lab/division hosting the event:
NCAR, NESL, CGD
Affiliation or organization:
Tuesday, September 30, 2014 - 12:00pm

Classical techniques for spatial interpolation have relied on the specification a stationary/isotropic covariance model for the characterization of spatial coherence. However, there is much interest in the development of more flexible methodologies capable of approximating the complex, nonstationary spatial dependence which often manifests itself in geophysical (and other) processes. Current techniques for achieving this have focused on either geometric deformations of the spatial domain or the construction of spatially varying covariance models. We present an alternative approach in which covariance is not directly modeled. Rather, dependence structure is learned via the construction of a multiresolution Bayesian spatial clustering process. Induced covariance is then naturally data-driven, nonstationary, and anisotropic. Example applications for several geostatistical problems will be presented.

Presenter(s):
Zachard Thomas
Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
Mesa Lab
Room:
Chapman Room

Posted by Carolyn Mueller (cmueller@ucar.edu) at x2491
Lab/division hosting the event:
NCAR, CISL, IMAGe
Affiliation or organization:
Tuesday, September 30, 2014 - 2:00pm

IPCC Chapter 11:  Near Term Climate Change

Ever wonder what the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report says?  Learn more Tuesday and Thursday afternoons this fall during a seminar series by IPCC authors and contributors. This fall’s focus is on Climate Change 2013: The Physical Science Basis (Working Group I’s contribution to the IPCC 5th Assessment Report).

Presenter(s):
Marika Holland
Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
CIRES Auditorium at CU-Boulder

Posted by Gaylynn Potemkin (potemkin@ucar.edu) at x1618
Lab/division hosting the event:
NCAR, CGD
Affiliation or organization:
Thursday, October 9, 2014 - 2:00pm

IPCC Chapter 6: Carbon and other Biogeochemical Cycles

Ever wonder what the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report says?  Learn more Tuesday and Thursday afternoons this fall during a seminar series by IPCC authors and contributors. This fall’s focus is on Climate Change 2013: The Physical Science Basis (Working Group I’s contribution to the IPCC 5th Assessment Report).

Presenter(s):
Pieter Tans
Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
CIRES Auditorium at CU-Boulder

Posted by Gaylynn Potemkin (potemkin@ucar.edu) at x1618
Lab/division hosting the event:
External:, CIRES-ATOC
Affiliation or organization:
Tuesday, October 14, 2014 - 9:00am

October 14, 2014
9:00-11:30 am
FL2-1003 
Administered by Passport Health
Walk-In Clinic - No registration required

FREE seasonal flu vaccination shots to eligible participants.  Nasal FluMist available upon request and co-payment of $19/pp.  Open to UCAR staff/visitors/retirees, their spouses/partners and dependent children 18-26 years of age.  More information @ UCAR Flu Vaccination Program website

UCAR Onsite Vaccination Clinic Schedule
FL - October 14, 2014, 9:00-11:30 am, FL2-1003
NWSC - October 21, 2014, 10:00-11:30, NWSC Conf Room
CG - October 28, 2014, 9:00-11:30 am, CG1-2126
RAF/Jeffco - November 4, 2014, 10:00-11:30 am, RAF/Jeff Conf Room
ML - November 13, 2014, 9:00-11:30, ML-Damon

Here's to your good health.  Sponsored by your friends on the Wellness Advisory Committee (WAC).

Presenter(s):
Passport Health
Type of event:
Wellness/Benefits
Building:
FL2
Room:
1003

Posted by Cheryl Cristanelli (cherylc@ucar.edu) at x3034
Lab/division hosting the event:
UCAR, F&A
Affiliation or organization:
Tuesday, October 14, 2014 - 2:00pm

IPCC Chapter 7: Clouds and Aerosols

Ever wonder what the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report says?  Learn more Tuesday and Thursday afternoons this fall during a seminar series by IPCC authors and contributors. This fall’s focus is on Climate Change 2013: The Physical Science Basis (Working Group I’s contribution to the IPCC 5th Assessment Report).

Presenter(s):
Dave Randall
Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
CIRES Auditorium at CU-Boulder

Posted by Gaylynn Potemkin (potemkin@ucar.edu) at x1618
Lab/division hosting the event:
External:, CIRES-ATOC
Affiliation or organization:
Wednesday, October 15, 2014 - 3:00pm

Ignite VI Presenters:

Eileen Carpenter & Marc Mueller, UCAR Center for Science Education
Rebecca Centeno Elliott, High Altitude Observatory
Sheldon Drobot, Research Applications Laboratory
Frank Flocke, Atmospheric Chemistry Division
John Hubbert, Earth Observing Laboratory
Paul Kushner, University of Toronto
Marla Meehl, Computational & Information Systems Laboratory, 
 Network Engineering & Telecommunications Section
Karyn Sawyer, Joint Office for Science Support

20 slides x 15 seconds per slide

Five-minute presentations that will enlighten, inspire, or make us think a little differently.

Presenter(s):
In the event description
Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
FL2
Room:
Main Seminar Room

Posted by Natalie Ponsford (nataliep@ucar.edu) at x2585
Lab/division hosting the event:
UCAR Community Programs, UCAR Center for Science Education
Tuesday, October 21, 2014 - 10:00am

October 21, 2014
10:00-11:30 am
NWSC-WY Conf Room 
Administered by Passport Health
Walk-In Clinic - No registration required

FREE seasonal flu vaccination shots to eligible participants.  Nasal FluMist available upon request and co-payment of $19/pp.  Open to UCAR staff/visitors/retirees, their spouses/partners and dependent children 18-26 years of age.  More information @ UCAR Flu Vaccination Program website

UCAR Onsite Vaccination Clinic Schedule
FL - October 14, 2014, 9:00-11:30 am, FL2-1003
NWSC - October 21, 2014, 10:00-11:30, NWSC Conf Room
CG - October 28, 2014, 9:00-11:30 am, CG1-2126
RAF/Jeffco - November 4, 2014, 10:00-11:30 am, RAF/Jeff Conf Room
ML - November 13, 2014, 9:00-11:30, ML-Damon

Here's to your good health.  Sponsored by your friends on the Wellness Advisory Committee (WAC).

Presenter(s):
Passport Health
Type of event:
Wellness/Benefits
Building:
NWSC-Cheyenne Data Center
Room:
Conf Room

Posted by Cheryl Cristanelli (cherylc@ucar.edu) at x3034
Lab/division hosting the event:
UCAR, F&A
Affiliation or organization:
Tuesday, October 21, 2014 - 2:00pm

IPCC Chapter 8: Anthropogenic and Natural Forcing

Ever wonder what the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report says?  Learn more Tuesday and Thursday afternoons this fall during a seminar series by IPCC authors and contributors. This fall’s focus is on Climate Change 2013: The Physical Science Basis (Working Group I’s contribution to the IPCC 5th Assessment Report).

Presenter(s):
J. F. Lamarque
Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
CIRES Auditorium at CU-Boulder

Posted by Gaylynn Potemkin (potemkin@ucar.edu) at x1618
Lab/division hosting the event:
External:, CIRES-ATOC
Affiliation or organization:
Tuesday, October 28, 2014 - 9:00am

October 28, 2014
9:00-11:30 am
CG1-2126 
Administered by Passport Health
Walk-In Clinic - No registration required

FREE seasonal flu vaccination shots to eligible participants.  Nasal FluMist available upon request and co-payment of $19/pp.  Open to UCAR staff/visitors/retirees, their spouses/partners and dependent children 18-26 years of age.  More information @ UCAR Flu Vaccination Program website

UCAR Onsite Vaccination Clinic Schedule
FL - October 14, 2014, 9:00-11:30 am, FL2-1003
NWSC - October 21, 2014, 10:00-11:30, NWSC Conf Room
CG - October 28, 2014, 9:00-11:30 am, CG1-2126
RAF/Jeffco - November 4, 2014, 10:00-11:30 am, RAF/Jeff Conf Room
ML - November 13, 2014, 9:00-11:30, ML-Damon

Here's to your good health.  Sponsored by your friends on the Wellness Advisory Committee (WAC).

Presenter(s):
Passport Health
Type of event:
Wellness/Benefits
Building:
CG1
Room:
2126

Posted by Cheryl Cristanelli (cherylc@ucar.edu) at x3034
Lab/division hosting the event:
UCAR, F&A
Affiliation or organization:
Tuesday, October 28, 2014 - 2:00pm

IPCC CHapter 12:  Long Term Climate Change 

Ever wonder what the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report says?  Learn more Tuesday and Thursday afternoons this fall during a seminar series by IPCC authors and contributors. This fall’s focus is on Climate Change 2013: The Physical Science Basis (Working Group I’s contribution to the IPCC 5th Assessment Report).

Presenter(s):
John Fasullo
Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
CIRES Auditorium at CU-Boulder

Posted by Gaylynn Potemkin (potemkin@ucar.edu) at x1618
Lab/division hosting the event:
External:, CIRES-ATOC
Affiliation or organization:
Tuesday, October 28, 2014 - 3:15pm

The interactions of aerosol particles with light and clouds are the leading uncertainties in our understanding of the climate system.  These interactions are determined in part by the structure of atmospheric particles.  In this talk, I will give an overview of research in my laboratory that focuses on characterizing the structure of particles and how this structure impacts heterogeneous atmospheric chemistry and climate.  In particular, the talk will focus on molecular-level studies of surfaces relevant for cirrus (ice) cloud formation and the phase separation behavior of submicron aerosol particles composed of organic and inorganic components.  Global climate models are extremely sensitive to the formation and properties of cirrus clouds.  While “active sites” are proposed to be important for ice nucleation, the identity of these sites is unknown.  Using systems in which the ice nucleation behavior is altered by chemical processing, we can determine the identity of these active sites.  In aerosol particles composed of organic and inorganic components, the arrangement of components within the particles affects the formation and growth of particles, their radiative properties, and heterogeneous chemistry.  For certain compositions, we observe that the morphology of submicron particles is size dependent, where small particles (less than approximately 200 nm) are homogeneous and large particles are phase separated.  I will comment on the possible origins of this size dependent behavior as well as potential impacts on aerosol radiative properties.  Through these projects, I will demonstrate the importance of characterizing aerosol structure in determining aerosol physical and chemical properties relevant to atmospheric chemistry and climate.

Presenter(s):
Miriam Freedman
Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
FL2
Room:
FL2-1022

Posted by Dianne Hodshon (dhodshon@ucar.edu) at x1401
Lab/division hosting the event:
NCAR, ACD
Affiliation or organization:
Tuesday, November 4, 2014 - 10:00am

November 4, 2014
10:00-11:30 am
RAF/Jeffco Conf Room 
Administered by Passport Health
Walk-In Clinic - No registration required

FREE seasonal flu vaccination shots to eligible participants.  Nasal FluMist available upon request and co-payment of $19/pp.  Open to UCAR staff/visitors/retirees, their spouses/partners and dependent children 18-26 years of age.  More information @ UCAR Flu Vaccination Program website

UCAR Onsite Vaccination Clinic Schedule
FL - October 14, 2014, 9:00-11:30 am, FL2-1003
NWSC - October 21, 2014, 10:00-11:30, NWSC Conf Room
CG - October 28, 2014, 9:00-11:30 am, CG1-2126
RAF/Jeffco - November 4, 2014, 10:00-11:30 am, RAF/Jeff Conf Room
ML - November 13, 2014, 9:00-11:30, ML-Damon

Here's to your good health.  Sponsored by your friends on the Wellness Advisory Committee (WAC).

Presenter(s):
Passport Health
Type of event:
Wellness/Benefits
Building:
RAF/Jeffco
Room:
Conf Room

Posted by Cheryl Cristanelli (cherylc@ucar.edu) at x3034
Lab/division hosting the event:
UCAR, F&A
Affiliation or organization:
Tuesday, November 4, 2014 - 2:00pm

IPCC Chapter 10: Detection and Attribution of Climate Change: From Global to Regional

Ever wonder what the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report says?  Learn more Tuesday and Thursday afternoons this fall during a seminar series by IPCC authors and contributors. This fall’s focus is on Climate Change 2013: The Physical Science Basis (Working Group I’s contribution to the IPCC 5th Assessment Report).

Presenter(s):
Judith Pearlwitz
Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
CIRES Auditorium at CU-Boulder

Posted by Gaylynn Potemkin (potemkin@ucar.edu) at x1618
Lab/division hosting the event:
External:, CIRES-ATOC
Saturday, November 8, 2014 - 10:00am

2014 Super Science Saturday brings together science and learning in one fun-filled day! Please join us for our "SUPER" annual event where both kids and adults explore hands-on activities, think about new ideas and learn how we study the weather.

Super Science Saturday, is a free day of science, learning, and fun at the NCAR Mesa Lab on November 8, 2014 from 10:00 am - 4:00 pm!

Find out how "measuring weather happens!" by:

  • Exploring activity tables
  • Performing experiments with CSU's Little Shop of Physics
  • See the Doppler on Wheels (DOW) in action
  • Learning about science with the NCAR Wizards
  • And more!

Super Science Saturday is open to the public and welcomes science explorers of all ages!

Events included:
  • Science Shows
  • Weather Balloon Launches
  • NCAR 3D Visualization Lab Demos
  • NCAR Wizards' Showcase
Activity tables:
  • UCAR Center for Science Education Wind Tunnel
  • The GLOBE Program
  • NCAR Computational and Information Systems Lab (CISL)
  • CSU Little Shop of Physics
  • Center for Severe Weather Research (CSWR)
  • UNAVCO
  • Front Range Community College
  • CU Atmosphere and Ocean Science Club
  • Face Fiesta - weather face painting
Date of the event:  November 8, 2014 - 10:00am to 4:00pm
Presenter(s):
UCAR Center for Science Education
Type of event:
Public Outreach
Building:
Mesa Lab

Posted by Natalie Ponsford (nataliep@ucar.edu) at x3034
Lab/division hosting the event:
UCAR Community Programs, UCAR Center for Science Education
Tuesday, November 11, 2014 - 2:00pm

IPCC Chapter 4: Observations: Cryosphere

Ever wonder what the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report says?  Learn more Tuesday and Thursday afternoons this fall during a seminar series by IPCC authors and contributors. This fall’s focus is on Climate Change 2013: The Physical Science Basis (Working Group I’s contribution to the IPCC 5th Assessment Report).

Presenter(s):
Tad Pfeffer
Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
CIRES Auditorium at CU-Boulder

Posted by Gaylynn Potemkin (potemkin@ucar.edu) at x1618
Lab/division hosting the event:
External:, CIRES-ATOC
Thursday, November 13, 2014 - 9:00am

November 13, 2014
9:00-11:30 am
ML-Damon 
Administered by Passport Health
Walk-In Clinic - No registration required

FREE seasonal flu vaccination shots to eligible participants.  Nasal FluMist available upon request and co-payment of $19/pp.  Open to UCAR staff/visitors/retirees, their spouses/partners and dependent children 18-26 years of age.  More information @ UCAR Flu Vaccination Program website

UCAR Onsite Vaccination Clinic Schedule
FL - October 14, 2014, 9:00-11:30 am, FL2-1003
NWSC - October 21, 2014, 10:00-11:30, NWSC Conf Room
CG - October 28, 2014, 9:00-11:30 am, CG1-2126
RAF/Jeffco - November 4, 2014, 10:00-11:30 am, RAF/Jeff Conf Room
ML - November 13, 2014, 9:00-11:30, ML-Damon

Here's to your good health.  Sponsored by your friends on the Wellness Advisory Committee (WAC).

Presenter(s):
Passport Health
Type of event:
Wellness/Benefits
Building:
Mesa Lab
Room:
Damon

Posted by Cheryl Cristanelli (cherylc@ucar.edu) at x3034
Lab/division hosting the event:
UCAR, F&A
Affiliation or organization:
Tuesday, November 18, 2014 - 2:00pm

IPCC Chapter 9:  Evaluation of Climate Models

Ever wonder what the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report says?  Learn more Tuesday and Thursday afternoons this fall during a seminar series by IPCC authors and contributors. This fall’s focus is on Climate Change 2013: The Physical Science Basis (Working Group I’s contribution to the IPCC 5th Assessment Report).

Presenter(s):
Clara Deser
Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
CIRES Auditorium at CU-Boulder

Posted by Gaylynn Potemkin (potemkin@ucar.edu) at x1618
Lab/division hosting the event:
External:, CIRES-ATOC
Affiliation or organization:
Tuesday, December 2, 2014 - 2:00pm

IPCC Chapter 13: Sea Level Change

Ever wonder what the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report says?  Learn more Tuesday and Thursday afternoons this fall during a seminar series by IPCC authors and contributors. This fall’s focus is on Climate Change 2013: The Physical Science Basis (Working Group I’s contribution to the IPCC 5th Assessment Report).

Presenter(s):
Steve Nerem
Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
CIRES Auditorium at CU-Boulder

Posted by Gaylynn Potemkin (potemkin@ucar.edu) at x1618
Lab/division hosting the event:
External:, CIRES-ATOC
Tuesday, December 9, 2014 - 2:00pm

IPCC Chapter 14: Climate Phenomena and their Relevance for Future Regional Climate Change

Ever wonder what the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report says?  Learn more Tuesday and Thursday afternoons this fall during a seminar series by IPCC authors and contributors. This fall’s focus is on Climate Change 2013: The Physical Science Basis (Working Group I’s contribution to the IPCC 5th Assessment Report).

Presenter(s):
Kevin Trenberth
Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
CIRES Auditorium at CU-Boulder

Posted by Gaylynn Potemkin (potemkin@ucar.edu) at x1618
Lab/division hosting the event:
External:, CIRES-ATOC
Affiliation or organization: