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Staff Notes Daily Calendar Events

Tuesday, October 28, 2014 - 11:00am

The impact of future Arctic sea ice loss on the atmospheric circulation and surface climate is investigated using the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM), NCAR’s “high-top” atmospheric model.

The tropospheric circulation response to late 21st century Arctic sea ice loss is characterized by a negative phase of the Northern annular mode (NAM), with maximum amplitude in winter consistent with previous studies. The less well-known stratospheric response transitions from a weakening of the polar vortex in winter to a strengthening of the vortex in spring. The stratospheric circulation response can be understood as a consequence of largely canceling effects from sea ice loss in the central Arctic and marginal ice zones, which drive opposite-signed changes in tropospheric wave driving.

The winter surface climate response to Arctic sea ice loss shows strong warming over the high-latitude continents. In the mid-latitudes, North America warms but central Eurasia cools slightly due to circulation effects. These seasonal mean changes are accompanied by a reduction in daily temperature variance. As a result, the risk of cold extremes over North America decreases due to Arctic sea ice loss, contradicting recent speculation. 

Presenter(s):
Lantao Sun
Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
Mesa Lab
Room:
Main Seminar Room

Posted by Gaylynn Potemkin (potemkin@ucar.edu) at x3034
Lab/division hosting the event:
NCAR, CGD
Affiliation or organization:
Tuesday, October 28, 2014 - 9:00am

October 28, 2014
9:00-11:30 am
CG1-2126 
Administered by Passport Health
Walk-In Clinic - No registration required

FREE seasonal flu vaccination shots to eligible participants.  Nasal FluMist available upon request and co-payment of $19/pp.  Open to UCAR staff/visitors/retirees, their spouses/partners and dependent children 18-26 years of age.  More information @ UCAR Flu Vaccination Program website

UCAR Onsite Vaccination Clinic Schedule
FL - October 14, 2014, 9:00-11:30 am, FL2-1003
NWSC - October 21, 2014, 10:00-11:30, NWSC Conf Room
CG - October 28, 2014, 9:00-11:30 am, CG1-2126
RAF/Jeffco - November 4, 2014, 10:00-11:30 am, RAF/Jeff Conf Room
ML - November 13, 2014, 9:00-11:30, ML-Damon

Here's to your good health.  Sponsored by your friends on the Wellness Advisory Committee (WAC).

Presenter(s):
Passport Health
Type of event:
Wellness/Benefits
Building:
CG1
Room:
2126

Posted by Cheryl Cristanelli (cherylc@ucar.edu) at x3034
Lab/division hosting the event:
UCAR, F&A
Affiliation or organization:
Thursday, November 20, 2014 - 1:30pm

Date: Thursday, November 20, 2014
Time: 1:30-2:30
Location: 
FL2-1022 (also webcast at http://ucarconnect.ucar.edu/live?room=fl21022)

Collisional Thermalization of Hydrogen and Helium in Solar Wind Plasma

In situ observations of solar wind plasma frequently show the temperature of alpha-particles (fully ionized helium) to significantly differ from that of protons (ionized hydrogen). Many heating processes in the solar wind act preferentially on alpha-particles, even as collisions among the plasma's ions act to gradually establish thermal equilibrium. Measurements from the Wind spacecraft's Faraday cups reveal that, at 1.0 AU from the Sun, the values of the alpha-proton temperature ratio has a complex, bimodal distribution. For this study, a simple, analytic model was developed for the evolution of this ratio with solar distance and then applied to each observation from the Wind Faraday cups to infer the value that the alpha-proton temperature ratio had been at 0.1 AU from the Sun. The distribution of these inferred values shows no trace of the bimodality observed at 1.0 AU but is instead consistent with known mechanisms for alpha-particle preferential heating. This result underscores the importance of collisional processes in the dynamics of the solar wind and suggests that similar mechanisms may lead to preferential alpha-particle heating in both slow and fast wind.

Presenter(s):
Ben Maruca
Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
FL2
Room:
1022

Posted by Sheryl Shapiro (sheryls@ucar.edu) at x1567
Lab/division hosting the event:
NCAR, HAO
Affiliation or organization:
Thursday, November 13, 2014 - 9:00am

November 13, 2014
9:00-11:30 am
ML-Damon 
Administered by Passport Health
Walk-In Clinic - No registration required

FREE seasonal flu vaccination shots to eligible participants.  Nasal FluMist available upon request and co-payment of $19/pp.  Open to UCAR staff/visitors/retirees, their spouses/partners and dependent children 18-26 years of age.  More information @ UCAR Flu Vaccination Program website

UCAR Onsite Vaccination Clinic Schedule
FL - October 14, 2014, 9:00-11:30 am, FL2-1003
NWSC - October 21, 2014, 10:00-11:30, NWSC Conf Room
CG - October 28, 2014, 9:00-11:30 am, CG1-2126
RAF/Jeffco - November 4, 2014, 10:00-11:30 am, RAF/Jeff Conf Room
ML - November 13, 2014, 9:00-11:30, ML-Damon

Here's to your good health.  Sponsored by your friends on the Wellness Advisory Committee (WAC).

Presenter(s):
Passport Health
Type of event:
Wellness/Benefits
Building:
Mesa Lab
Room:
Damon

Posted by Cheryl Cristanelli (cherylc@ucar.edu) at x3034
Lab/division hosting the event:
UCAR, F&A
Affiliation or organization:
Thursday, October 23, 2014 - 3:00pm

The NCAR LIbrary and Archives Presents: Joseph P. Bassi, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University

Successfully Navigating Scientific Borderlands and Subcultures:
Astronomer Walter Orr Roberts, The Sun-Earth Connection and the National Center for Atmospheric Research

Abstract:
The National Science Foundation created the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) as the US’s premier location for atmospheric studies. Walter Orr Roberts helped to create NCAR in the late 1950s and then became its first director. Roberts, however, was neither a meteorologist nor an atmospheric physicist. He was rather a well-regarded solar astronomer and observatory administrator who had never done any research directly in meteorology or atmospheric physics. The question arises, how did a scientist with minimal background in atmospheric physics become the founding director of a major research institution for this field of scientific investigation?

This paper shows how Roberts negotiated between two disparate science subcultures—astronomy and meteorology—by exploiting a disciplinary borderland between these fields, the study of the sun-earth connection. Specifically, he was able to obtain cache in the meteorological—an earth science—community by his deep and lasting interest in sun-weather studies. It is interesting to note that Roberts came to these studies as an attempt to demonstrate the practical (earth-based) applications of solar research in order to entice sponsorship from private donors.

Although not known for any widely recognized research in atmospheric physics, his interest in the science of the sun-weather connection enabled him to develop communion with many in the meteorological community of the 1950s. By navigating this solar research-earth science borderland and having the reputation as a successful scientific administrator, Roberts then quickly became a prime candidate to be NCAR’s founding director.

In his ten year tenure, Roberts did establish NCAR as the world-class research center the NSF intended it to become. His experience illustrates that the existence of scientific borderlands such as the sun-earth connection can have important ramifications disciplines involved and earth sciences in general.

Presenter(s):
Joseph P. Bassi, PhD.
Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
FL2
Room:
1001

Posted by Faith Percell (faith@ucar.edu) at x1176
Lab/division hosting the event:
NCAR, NCAR Director's Office, NCAR Library
Affiliation or organization:
Tuesday, November 4, 2014 - 10:00am

November 4, 2014
10:00-11:30 am
RAF/Jeffco Conf Room 
Administered by Passport Health
Walk-In Clinic - No registration required

FREE seasonal flu vaccination shots to eligible participants.  Nasal FluMist available upon request and co-payment of $19/pp.  Open to UCAR staff/visitors/retirees, their spouses/partners and dependent children 18-26 years of age.  More information @ UCAR Flu Vaccination Program website

UCAR Onsite Vaccination Clinic Schedule
FL - October 14, 2014, 9:00-11:30 am, FL2-1003
NWSC - October 21, 2014, 10:00-11:30, NWSC Conf Room
CG - October 28, 2014, 9:00-11:30 am, CG1-2126
RAF/Jeffco - November 4, 2014, 10:00-11:30 am, RAF/Jeff Conf Room
ML - November 13, 2014, 9:00-11:30, ML-Damon

Here's to your good health.  Sponsored by your friends on the Wellness Advisory Committee (WAC).

Presenter(s):
Passport Health
Type of event:
Wellness/Benefits
Building:
RAF/Jeffco
Room:
Conf Room

Posted by Cheryl Cristanelli (cherylc@ucar.edu) at x3034
Lab/division hosting the event:
UCAR, F&A
Affiliation or organization:
Tuesday, October 28, 2014 - 9:30am

Tuesday, October 28, 2014
9:30am
FL 2 - Room 1022

Bob Sharman
National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO
Sharman@ucar.edu - 303.497.8457

Turbulence is a well-known hazard to the aviation sector. It is responsible for numerous injuries each year, with occasional fatalities, and is the underlying cause of many people’s fear of air travel. Not only are turbulence encounters a safety issue, they are the source of millions of dollars of operational costs to airlines, leading to increased costs passed on to the consumer. For these reasons, pilots, dispatchers, and air traffic controllers attempt to avoid turbulence wherever possible. A common method of avoidance involves circumventing regions or altitudes where turbulence was recently encountered and reported by other aircraft. Empirical rules are also used to identify weather patterns known to be conducive to the generation of turbulence; pilots employ these rules during flight and operational weather forecasters on the ground also provide guidance. However, these methods are imprecise at best and to some extent reflect misunderstandings and underappreciations of the underlying complexity of turbulence processes.  

Here recent advances in strategic turbulence forecasting at cruise altitudes for commercial aircraft (i.e. the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere, UTLS) will be presented.  These advances are supported by (1) more precise observations of turbulence that can be used to better verify turbulence forecasts, (2) better automated methods for predicting aviation scale turbulence, and (3) enhanced understanding of turbulent processes based on high-resolution numerical simulations.  Each aspect of this three-pronged approach will be discussed and current research needs will be summarized.

Presenter(s):
Robert Sharman
Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
FL2
Room:
1022

Posted by Marybeth Zarlingo (zarlingo@ucar.edu) at x2751
Lab/division hosting the event:
NCAR, RAL, AAP
Affiliation or organization:
Tuesday, November 11, 2014 - 10:30am

RAL SEMINAR SERIES

Speaker:  David Gochis  
Date:       November 11, 2014
Time:      10:30am
Place:      FL 2 – Room 1022
Title:       Recent developments and applications of the WRF-Hydro modeling system for continental scale water cycle predictions

Abstract:

The translation of weather and climate forcing through complex landscapes to drive terrestrial hydrologic processes is a true multi-scale problem.  Model architectures that attempt to capture these processes and feedbacks in a physically realistic way must be able to bridge spatial scales from meters to kilometers.  To represent these processes across continental domains modeling systems must fully embrace high performance computing.  Also, because there are both scientific and computational trade-offs in modeling many terrestrial hydrologic and land-atmosphere exchange processes, it is often highly advantageous to support multiple physics options in order to test competing hypotheses and apply scale-appropriate parameterizations for different prediction problems.  In this talk we provide an update of new developments to the WRF-Hydro system in meeting these needs from both a process representation and high performance computing perspective.  A key feature of these developments centers on new multi-scale modeling capabilities recently added to WRF-Hydro.  We will discuss prediction and computational performance metrics for several recent large river basin and continental scale applications of the WRF-Hydro system over the coterminous U.S. and over Mexico in modes both coupled and uncoupled to the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model.  We will also provide updates on new developments to the WRF-Hydro system in the areas of water management applications and hydrologic data assimilation.

This seminar will be webcast
FL2_1022 (Large Auditorium) Webcast link
http://www.fin.ucar.edu/it/mms/fl-live.htm or http://ucarconnect.ucar.edu/live?room=fl21022

Presenter(s):
David Gochis
Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
FL2
Room:
1022

Posted by Marybeth Zarlingo (zarlingo@ucar.edu) at x2751
Lab/division hosting the event:
NCAR, RAL, HAP
Affiliation or organization:
Tuesday, October 28, 2014 - 2:00pm

IPCC CHapter 12:  Long Term Climate Change 

Ever wonder what the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report says?  Learn more Tuesday and Thursday afternoons this fall during a seminar series by IPCC authors and contributors. This fall’s focus is on Climate Change 2013: The Physical Science Basis (Working Group I’s contribution to the IPCC 5th Assessment Report).

Presenter(s):
John Fasullo
Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
CIRES Auditorium at CU-Boulder

Posted by Gaylynn Potemkin (potemkin@ucar.edu) at x1618
Lab/division hosting the event:
External:, CIRES-ATOC
Affiliation or organization:
Tuesday, November 4, 2014 - 2:00pm

IPCC Chapter 10: Detection and Attribution of Climate Change: From Global to Regional

Ever wonder what the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report says?  Learn more Tuesday and Thursday afternoons this fall during a seminar series by IPCC authors and contributors. This fall’s focus is on Climate Change 2013: The Physical Science Basis (Working Group I’s contribution to the IPCC 5th Assessment Report).

Presenter(s):
Judith Pearlwitz
Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
CIRES Auditorium at CU-Boulder

Posted by Gaylynn Potemkin (potemkin@ucar.edu) at x1618
Lab/division hosting the event:
External:, CIRES-ATOC
Tuesday, November 11, 2014 - 2:00pm

IPCC Chapter 4: Observations: Cryosphere

Ever wonder what the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report says?  Learn more Tuesday and Thursday afternoons this fall during a seminar series by IPCC authors and contributors. This fall’s focus is on Climate Change 2013: The Physical Science Basis (Working Group I’s contribution to the IPCC 5th Assessment Report).

Presenter(s):
Tad Pfeffer
Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
CIRES Auditorium at CU-Boulder

Posted by Gaylynn Potemkin (potemkin@ucar.edu) at x1618
Lab/division hosting the event:
External:, CIRES-ATOC
Tuesday, November 18, 2014 - 2:00pm

IPCC Chapter 9:  Evaluation of Climate Models

Ever wonder what the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report says?  Learn more Tuesday and Thursday afternoons this fall during a seminar series by IPCC authors and contributors. This fall’s focus is on Climate Change 2013: The Physical Science Basis (Working Group I’s contribution to the IPCC 5th Assessment Report).

Presenter(s):
Clara Deser
Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
CIRES Auditorium at CU-Boulder

Posted by Gaylynn Potemkin (potemkin@ucar.edu) at x1618
Lab/division hosting the event:
External:, CIRES-ATOC
Affiliation or organization:
Tuesday, December 2, 2014 - 2:00pm

IPCC Chapter 13: Sea Level Change

Ever wonder what the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report says?  Learn more Tuesday and Thursday afternoons this fall during a seminar series by IPCC authors and contributors. This fall’s focus is on Climate Change 2013: The Physical Science Basis (Working Group I’s contribution to the IPCC 5th Assessment Report).

Presenter(s):
Steve Nerem
Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
CIRES Auditorium at CU-Boulder

Posted by Gaylynn Potemkin (potemkin@ucar.edu) at x1618
Lab/division hosting the event:
External:, CIRES-ATOC
Tuesday, December 9, 2014 - 2:00pm

IPCC Chapter 14: Climate Phenomena and their Relevance for Future Regional Climate Change

Ever wonder what the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report says?  Learn more Tuesday and Thursday afternoons this fall during a seminar series by IPCC authors and contributors. This fall’s focus is on Climate Change 2013: The Physical Science Basis (Working Group I’s contribution to the IPCC 5th Assessment Report).

Presenter(s):
Kevin Trenberth
Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
CIRES Auditorium at CU-Boulder

Posted by Gaylynn Potemkin (potemkin@ucar.edu) at x1618
Lab/division hosting the event:
External:, CIRES-ATOC
Affiliation or organization:
Thursday, October 23, 2014 - 3:15pm

Jim Ramsay
McGill University

Given the discouraging state of current global efforts to curb global warming, we can imagine that we will soon turn our attention to mitigation.  On a global scale, distressed populations will turn to national and international organizations for solutions to dramatic problems caused by climate change.  These institutions in turn will mandate the collection of data on a scale and resolution that will present extraordinary statistical and computational challenges to those of us viewed as having the appropriate expertise. A review of the current state of our space-time data analysis machinery suggests that we have much to do.  The shortcomings of the current methods for representing data collected over high textured spatial and temporal domains requiring multi-resolution representations will be considered. Topics considered will be (1) the dependency on assumptions of stationarity and isotropy, (2) methods for representing functions of space/time, (3) the limitations of principal components analysis or empirical orthogonal functions as representers and (4) the over-dependence on Cartesian coordinate systems, whether linear or nonlinear.  Some reflections on where we need to go in the relatively small number of years that we have to prepare will follow.  It seems urgent that we mount a large international research effort with funding that is adequate for the what we will have do.

 

Thursday, October 23, 2014*
Mesa Lab – Fleischmann Building
3:15pm

*Dr. Ramsay will also present "Multivariate and Functional Principal Components without Eigenanalysis" at CU Boulder on October 24: http://amath.colorado.edu/content/colloquium-james-o-ramsay

Presenter(s):
James Ramsay
Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
Fleischman

Posted by s gentile (sgentile@ucar.edu) at x2480
Lab/division hosting the event:
NCAR, CISL, IMAGe
Affiliation or organization:
Saturday, November 8, 2014 - 10:00am

2014 Super Science Saturday brings together science and learning in one fun-filled day! Please join us for our "SUPER" annual event where both kids and adults explore hands-on activities, think about new ideas and learn how we study the weather.

Super Science Saturday, is a free day of science, learning, and fun at the NCAR Mesa Lab on November 8, 2014 from 10:00 am - 4:00 pm!

Find out how "measuring weather happens!" by:

  • Exploring activity tables
  • Performing experiments with CSU's Little Shop of Physics
  • See the Doppler on Wheels (DOW) in action
  • Learning about science with the NCAR Wizards
  • And more!

Super Science Saturday is open to the public and welcomes science explorers of all ages!

Events included:
  • Science Shows
  • Weather Balloon Launches
  • NCAR 3D Visualization Lab Demos
  • NCAR Wizards' Showcase
Activity tables:
  • UCAR Center for Science Education Wind Tunnel
  • The GLOBE Program
  • NCAR Computational and Information Systems Lab (CISL)
  • CSU Little Shop of Physics
  • Center for Severe Weather Research (CSWR)
  • UNAVCO
  • Front Range Community College
  • CU Atmosphere and Ocean Science Club
  • Face Fiesta - weather face painting
Date of the event:  November 8, 2014 - 10:00am to 4:00pm
Presenter(s):
UCAR Center for Science Education
Type of event:
Public Outreach
Building:
Mesa Lab

Posted by Natalie Ponsford (nataliep@ucar.edu) at x3034
Lab/division hosting the event:
UCAR Community Programs, UCAR Center for Science Education
Thursday, October 30, 2014 - 3:30pm

Jacob Berg
DTU Wind Energy
Roskilde, Denmark

In wind energy applications the turbulent velocity field of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) is often characterised by Gaussian probability density functions. When estimating the dynamical loads on wind turbines this has been the rule more than anything else. From numerous studies in the laboratory, in Direct Numerical Simulations, and from in-situ measurements of the ABL we know, however, that turbulence is not purely Gaussian: the smallest and fastest scales often exhibit extreme behaviour characterised by strong non-Gaussian statistics. In this contribution we want to investigate whether these non-Gaussian effects are important when determining wind turbine loads, and hence of utmost importance to the design criteria and lifetime of a wind turbine.

We devise a method based on Principal Orthogonal Decomposition where non-Gaussian velocity fields generated by high-resolution pseudo-spectral Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) of the ABL are transformed so that they maintain the exact same second-order statistics including variations of the statistics with height, but are otherwise Gaussian. In that way we can investigate in isolation the question whether it is important for wind turbine loads to include non-Gaussian properties of atmospheric turbulence.

Using the load simulation software HAWC2 with both the non-Gaussian and newly constructed Gaussian fields, respectively, we show that the Fatigue loads and most of the Extreme loads are unaltered when using non-Gaussian velocity fields. The turbine thus acts like a low-pass filter which average out the non-Gaussian behaviour on time scales close to and faster than the revolution time of the turbine. For a few of the Extreme load estimations there is, on the other hand, a tendency that non-Gaussian effects increase the overall dynamical load, and hence can be of importance in wind energy load estimations.

This seminar will be webcast live at:
http://www.fin.ucar.edu/it/mms/fl-live.htm

Recorded seminar link can be viewed here:
https://www.mmm.ucar.edu/events/seminars

Thursday, 30 October 2014, 3:30 PM
Refreshments 3:15 PM
NCAR-Foothills Laboratory
3450 Mitchell Lane
Bldg 2 Main Auditorium, Room 1022

Presenter(s):
Jacob Berg
Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
FL2
Room:
1022

Posted by Michelle Menard (menard@ucar.edu) at x8189
Lab/division hosting the event:
NCAR, NESL, MMM
Affiliation or organization:
Tuesday, October 28, 2014 - 3:30pm

The interactions of aerosol particles with light and clouds are the leading uncertainties in our understanding of the climate system.  These interactions are determined in part by the structure of atmospheric particles.  In this talk, I will give an overview of research in my laboratory that focuses on characterizing the structure of particles and how this structure impacts heterogeneous atmospheric chemistry and climate.  In particular, the talk will focus on molecular-level studies of surfaces relevant for cirrus (ice) cloud formation and the phase separation behavior of submicron aerosol particles composed of organic and inorganic components.  Global climate models are extremely sensitive to the formation and properties of cirrus clouds.  While “active sites” are proposed to be important for ice nucleation, the identity of these sites is unknown.  Using systems in which the ice nucleation behavior is altered by chemical processing, we can determine the identity of these active sites.  In aerosol particles composed of organic and inorganic components, the arrangement of components within the particles affects the formation and growth of particles, their radiative properties, and heterogeneous chemistry.  For certain compositions, we observe that the morphology of submicron particles is size dependent, where small particles (less than approximately 200 nm) are homogeneous and large particles are phase separated.  I will comment on the possible origins of this size dependent behavior as well as potential impacts on aerosol radiative properties.  Through these projects, I will demonstrate the importance of characterizing aerosol structure in determining aerosol physical and chemical properties relevant to atmospheric chemistry and climate.

Presenter(s):
Miriam Freedman
Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
FL2
Room:
FL2-1022

Posted by Dianne Hodshon (dhodshon@ucar.edu) at x1401
Lab/division hosting the event:
NCAR, NESL, ACD
Affiliation or organization: