UCAR President's Office

UCAR publishes guidance to next presidential administration and Congress

BOULDER, Colo. — The University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR) has published guidance for the next U.S. presidential administration and Congress on the importance of better understanding and predicting weather, water, climate, and other aspects of the Earth system.A UCAR white paper emphasizes that focused investment of federal resources in the atmospheric, Earth, and related sciences will make significant contributions addressing important societal needs. These include protection of lives and property, expansion of new economic opportunities, enhancement of national security, and strengthening U.S. leadership in research and development."More than ever, federal support of research and education into the Earth system is critical to the nation," said UCAR President Antonio J. Busalacchi. "We are on the verge of a new era of prediction, based on understanding how the entire Earth system works. This will have a direct positive impact on lives and livelihoods."UCAR is a nonprofit consortium of 110 member colleges and universities.The white paper proposes federal support for advancing computer models, new observing systems, and more powerful computing resources, as well as a strong science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education system. Its proposals include a National Academies' decadal survey, involving representatives of the public and private sectors, which would develop priorities for weather research and forecasting."The United States should be the unambiguous leader in predicting weather, water, climate, and related systems," Busalacchi said. "Transforming this knowledge into action will allow our nation and the world to effectively respond and adapt to changing environmental conditions."UCAR federal government transition resources can be found here. 

UCAR/NCAR statement on the passing of Ralph J. Cicerone

Ralph Cicerone pictured at NCAR in the 1980s. (©UCAR. Photo by Ginger Hein. This image is freely available for media & nonprofit use.)The National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) and the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR) join colleagues in the Earth system science community and beyond in mourning the loss of renowned atmospheric scientist Ralph J. Cicerone, who died on Nov. 5.Dr. Cicerone left his job as a research chemist at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography in 1980 to join NCAR, where he led the Atmospheric Chemistry Division. In 1989, Dr. Cicerone took on a new challenge, accepting an offer to build an interdisciplinary department of geosciences at the University of California, Irvine.  "Ralph was a pioneer in thinking about the Earth as a connected system," said UCAR President Antonio J. Busalacchi. "His willingness to work across disciplines in pursuit of a deeper understanding of how the pieces of the Earth system fit together set an example for atmospheric scientists and helped set the research direction for our community as well as the whole of the National Academy of Sciences. His loss will be deeply felt at NCAR, UCAR, and far beyond."Read Dr. Cicerone's full obituary at the National Academy of Sciences webpage. 

UCAR president to be inducted into National Academy of Engineering

BOULDER, Colo. — Antonio "Tony" J. Busalacchi, president of the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR), will be inducted next week into the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) during a ceremony in Washington, D.C.Election to the NAE honors those who have made outstanding contributions to engineering research, practice, or education. It is among the highest professional distinctions accorded to an engineer and those working at the intersection of science and engineering.Busalacchi was elected for his contributions to "understanding of tropical oceans in coupled climate systems via remotely sensed observations and for international leadership of climate prediction/projection research."UCAR President Antonio J. Busalacchi has been elected to the National Academy of Engineering. Click here for a higher-resolution image. (©UCAR. Photo by Carlye Calvin. This image is freely available for media & nonprofit use.)"I am deeply honored to be elected to this distinguished group," Busalacchi said. "As a nation we face a number of challenges in sustaining our ability to observe and predict weather, water, and climate. Despite such challenges, I am very optimistic about what the future holds at UCAR for our ability to predict the coupled Earth system to the ultimate betterment of society."UCAR is a consortium of more than 100 North American member colleges and universities focused on research and training in the atmospheric and related Earth system sciences.Busalacchi joined UCAR as president in August. He was previously the director of the Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center at the University of Maryland. Busalacchi is also a fellow of the American Meteorological Society (2005), the American Geophysical Union (2009), and the American Association for the Advancement of Science (2011)."The leadership and vision that Tony has brought to the Earth system science community — recognized by his numerous awards, including this induction into the distinguished National Academy of Engineering — are a tremendous asset to UCAR," said Eric Betterton, Chair of the UCAR Board of Trustees and a distinguished professor at the University of Arizona. "We are thrilled that Tony agreed to join UCAR and help set our direction as an interdisciplinary hub for researchers tackling some of the toughest scientific problems of our time."Busalacchi is one of 80 U.S. members and 22 foreign members who will be inducted into the NAE during its annual meeting on Oct. 9. He joins other past inductees from UCAR or the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), which is managed by UCAR on behalf of the National Science Foundation. Those academy members include C. Gordon Little (1974), Robert Serafin (1994), Margaret LeMone (1997), Robert Dickinson (2002), Warren Washington (2002), and Timothy Killeen (2007).The mission of NAE is to advance the well-being of the nation by promoting a vibrant engineering profession and by marshaling the expertise and insights of eminent engineers to provide independent advice to the federal government on matters involving engineering and technology. The NAE is part of The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.

UCAR congressional briefing highlights flood, drought prediction

WASHINGTON — The nation is poised to make major advances in "water intelligence" with more detailed forecasts of floods, streamflow, and potential drought conditions, a panel of experts said at a congressional briefing today.The briefing, sponsored by the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR), highlighted the new National Water Model, a comprehensive system for forecasting water resources from coast to coast. The technology underpinning the model, launched last month by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), was developed by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) and its collaborators at universities, the National Science Foundation and other federal agencies, and the private sector."The new forecast model is really a quantum leap forward and will help safeguard Americans from major floods and other precipitation events," said UCAR President Antonio J. Busalacchi, who introduced the panel. "It bridges the gap between research and operations, generating real-time forecasts to help vulnerable communities and protect lives and property."UCAR manages NCAR on behalf of the National Science Foundation."Through a series of partnerships, it's possible to provide consistent, high-resolution, integrated water analyses, predictions, and data to address critical unmet information and service gaps," said Edward Clark, director of the Geo-Intelligence Office of Water Prediction at the NOAA National Water Center.Scientists generated this inundation forecast during Houston-area flooding earlier this year in a demonstration of  advanced computer modeling technology. (©UCAR. Image by David Gochis, NCAR. This image is freely available for media & nonprofit use.)Unlike past streamflow models, which provided forecasts every few hours and only for specific points along major river systems, the new system continuously simulates conditions at 2.7 million locations along rivers, streams, and their tributaries across the contiguous United States. It paves the way for the biggest improvement in flood forecasting in the nation's history."The National Water Model provides a different way of thinking about continental hydrology by providing a view of a connected plumbing network from the mountains to the ocean," said panelist Richard Hooper, executive director of the Consortium of Universities for the Advancement of Hydrologic Science (CUAHSI). "Previously, hydrologists had considered river basins as discrete units rather than this river-continuum approach. This change in view opens up new areas of research that will improve our ability to predict not just floods but other aspects of water resources, including water quality and the impacts of droughts."Thanks to ongoing research, the National Water Model is expected to provide increasingly detailed street-level forecasts, inundation maps, and additional features such as water quality forecasts. Scientists are working on incorporating more processes, such as soil saturation and the amount of water drawn up by vegetation."By dramatically increasing the geographic coverage as well as the lead times for forecasts, the National Water Model is ushering in a new era in flood and flash flood forecasting," said John McHenry, chief scientist of advanced meteorological systems for Baron Services. "Business, industry, and the general public will benefit through reduction in lost lives and property."The panelists emphasized the importance of water resources to the major sectors of the U.S. economy. They warned that the nation is facing myriad water-related challenges ranging from growing demand to increasingly costly floods and droughts. Meeting those challenges will require continued coordination among research organizations, universities, the private sector, and federal, state, and local agencies."Beyond developing a new computer model, we're building a community by sharing resources, tools, and ideas," said NCAR scientist David Gochis. "The scientists are engaging with practitioners and decision makers to make the system as usable as possible."The development team at NCAR worked with scientists at NOAA, the U.S. Geological Survey, and universities to adapt WRF-Hydro to serve as the first version of the National Water Model.The panelists also discussed the need for better water intelligence among diverse communities across the country. For example, Ryan Emanuel, associate professor at North Carolina State University's Department of Forestry and Environmental Resources, noted that indigenous tribes across the nation are particularly vulnerable to drought and flooding for a range of cultural, historical, and economic reasons."Indigenous peoples across the United States are diverse, but one common theme is that water is sacred," said Emanuel, a member of the Lumbee Tribe of North Carolina. "It's not only critical for life, but it is life itself. Beyond the tools, the models, and the management lies the knowledge of the original inhabitants of this nation that water binds us all to a common fate."The event is the latest in a series of UCAR congressional briefings about critical topics in the Earth system sciences. Past briefings have focused on predicting space weather, aviation weather safety, the state of the Arctic, hurricane prediction, and potential impacts of El Niño.

Meet and Greet with Tony Busalacchi, UCAR President

Mark your calendars for a meet and greet session with UCAR President Tony Busalacchi. All staff are welcome to attend. This is an opportunity for you to meet Tony, hear about his background, and learn about his initial impressions as UCAR President.

Meet and Greet with Tony Busalacchi, UCAR President

Mark your calendars for a meet and greet session with UCAR President Tony Busalacchi. All staff are welcome to attend. This is an opportunity for you to meet Tony, hear about his background, and learn about his initial impressions as UCAR President.

Intellectual Property Protection for the Lab

Intellectual Property Protection for the Lab - a presentation by the UCAR Office of General Counsel.

Learn the difference between copyrights, trademarks and patents.  Understand how to protect your intellectual property and where to get help.

Export Brown Bag Lunch and Learn

Is Your Shipment Export Controlled?  Is Your Project In Compliance with Export Controls?"

This will be a Q&A format with open discussion open to all interested Staff.

Friday, September 16, 2016

Noon - 1:30 pm

FL2 - Room 1022 Main Seminar Room

Facilitated by ECCs, Logistics Staff and David Sundvall

How Boulder Became a World Center for Space and Atmospheric Science #1 - Boulder Bookstore

Published by the American Meteorological Society, A Scientific Peak chronicles the early stages of Boulder’s meteoric rise to become known as one of America’s smartest cities. Author Joseph P. Bassi introduces us to a wide variety of characters, including founding NCAR Director and UCAR President Walter Orr Roberts, and the serendipitous brew of politics, passion, and sheer luck that, during the post–World War II and Cold War eras, would transform this “scientific Siberia” into the research mecca it is today.

Board Chair Eric Betterton All-Staff Town Hall

Please join the UCAR Board of Trustees Chair Eric Betterton as he hosts an all-staff Town Hall meeting from 9:00 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. on Wednesday, September 9.  All UCAR, NCAR, and UCP staff are encouraged to attend. The Town Hall will be held in the CG1 auditorium.  For staff who are unable to attend in person, the Town Hall will be webcast on  http://www.fin.ucar.edu/it/mms/cg-live-chat1.htm only (not UCARLive) and recorded.

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