October 06, 2010
El Niño and La Niña are counterparts in the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), a cyclic warming and cooling of the eastern and central Pacific Ocean that exerts a major influence on global weather patterns, but they are not mirror images.
Ocean waves rolling into shore.
September 21, 2010
Sustained winds can produce a parting of the waters under certain conditions.
illustration of wind setdown with area map inset
July 13, 2010
The study, published in Nature Geoscience, finds that the rise is at least partly a result of climate change.
June 03, 2010
A detailed computer modeling study released today indicates that oil from the massive spill in the Gulf of Mexico might soon extend along thousands of miles of the Atlantic coast and open ocean as early as this summer.
September 11, 2009
Michele Rienecker—the head of NASA's Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO)—knows how challenging it is to predict El Niño.
September 03, 2009
Along with unusually persistent rains, there was a different kind of watery surprise this summer for people on the U.S. Atlantic coast. From the barrier islands of the Southeast to the rocky shores of Maine, tides ran as high as 2 feet above predicted values.
UCAR Magazine
May 27, 2009
Melting of the Greenland ice sheet may drive more water than previously thought toward the already threatened coastlines of New York, Boston, Halifax, and other cities in the northeastern United States and Canada.
Color visualization of globe with North Pole in center
April 14, 2009
The threat of global warming can still be greatly diminished if nations cut emissions of heat-trapping greenhouse gases by 70 percent this century, according to a new analysis.
Global Warming: Cuts in Greenhouse Gas Emissions Would Save Arctic Ice, Reduce S
March 09, 2009
A team of researchers that includes NCAR’s Synte Peacock and Frank Bryan has carried out the first-ever century-long global ocean simulations with high enough resolution to capture mesoscale eddies.
Ocean wave
January 14, 2009
New research by NCAR scientists uses atmospheric general circulation model experiments to explore how projected losses in Arctic sea ice may affect climate.
Broken ice in the Arctic Ocean
October 01, 2008
Andrea Sealy, NCAR's Advanced Study Program • If you are from the Caribbean and you're good at math and science, the advice you get is to become a doctor, says Sealy. "But I never liked biology much," she adds. Now she's a researcher at the Caribbean Institute for Meteorology and Hydrology.
Photograph of Andrea Sealy
September 24, 2008
NCAR scientists Bill Large and Steve Yeager have produced a new analysis of the exchanges of heat, momentum, and moisture between the oceans and atmosphere that should help climate modelers better assess variability on several time scales.
The sun setting over the ocean.
June 10, 2008
The rate of climate warming over northern Alaska, Canada, and Russia could more than triple during periods of rapid sea ice loss, according to a new study led by NCAR.
Color image of two globes showing sea ice decline in the northern hemisphere
April 21, 2008
The shrinking expanse of Arctic sea ice is increasingly vulnerable to summer sunshine, new research concludes.
Jennifer Kay
February 07, 2008
Natural processes may prevent oceans from warming beyond a certain point, helping protect some coral reefs from the impacts of climate change, new research finds.
Photograph of Joan Kleypas
January 01, 2005
Joan Kleypas, NCAR's Climate and Global Dynamics Division • "Jacques Cousteau was my idol while growing up," confesses Kleypas. The undersea world revealed in his groundbreaking television programs inspired her to become an ocean scientist.
Joan Kleypas
September 01, 2004
Holland recalls that when she entered graduate school at the University of Colorado, she had "the fuzzy idea of doing something with climate." She left graduate school with a sharp focus on the role of sea ice in the climate system.
Photo of Marika Holland

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