December 31, 2012
More than two days ahead of landfall, it was clear that Hurricane Sandy could bring higher water than New York and New Jersey had seen in decades. But for thousands of people in the area, the threat simply didn’t register. (Part 1 of 2)
Hurricane Sandy storm surge-wreckage of New Jersey roller coaster
December 31, 2012
Sandy's storm surge was more than twice that of other recent tropical cyclones in the New York City area—but several other factors teamed up to bring waters to their catastrophically high level. (Part 2 of 2)
Dissecting Sandy's storm surge-graphic shows top-10 high water events at Battery Park, NYC
December 12, 2012
Though we’re still more than two weeks from the end of 2012, it’s not too soon to get a sense of how the year will go down in meteorological annals. Some of the signals from January to November are so strong that December won’t change the outcome.
Weather year in review-map showing U.S. heat, global warmth
December 11, 2012
The new system provides 8-hour forecasts of potentially dangerous atmospheric conditions over remote ocean regions
November 09, 2012
NOAA has cancelled the El Niño Watch that’s been in effect since late summer (see PDF), but this doesn't guarantee a placid U.S. winter.
Snowy street in Seattle
November 02, 2012
Every so often, a quiet corner of research suddenly grabs the spotlight. Such was the case this week when a Category 1 Atlantic hurricane morphed into Superstorm Sandy.
UCAR Magazine
October 29, 2012
Hurricane Sandy is on track to carve its way into weather annals. There will no doubt be devastating, deadly effects, along with some impacts one doesn’t expect in a hurricane.
Hurricane Sandy
October 25, 2012
Hurricane Sandy may pummel the mid-Atlantic coast early next week, possibly carving out multiple niches in U.S. weather history while producing what could easily be billions of dollars in damage.
GFDL forecast depicting of Hurricane Sandy inland near Philadelphia
October 08, 2012
First in the queue for the NCAR-Wyoming Yellowstone system is a set of 11 computing-intensive projects tackling major problems in Earth and atmospheric science.
Close-up depiction of solar turbulence
October 04, 2012
The United States faces more varied weather risks than most nations on Earth, but we also have uniquely strong capabilities to confront these risks, thanks to decades of research conducted by government agencies, universities, and the private weather industry.
Cars buried in snow during March 2003 storm in Boulder County, CO
August 31, 2012
Researchers at NCAR are working with forecasters and emergency managers to unravel the communication challenges around hurricanes like Isaac, which had relatively weak winds but a strong storm surge.
UCAR Magazine
August 21, 2012
Accounting for clouds in weather forecasting could greatly improve road safety.
road stretching to horizon, with blue sky and clouds above
August 17, 2012
Researchers ponder the implications of a massive summer storm in the Arctic Ocean that swept across a weakened ice pack.
UCAR Magazine
August 17, 2012
Studies show 63% of hurricane-related deaths occur inland. To help emergency managers prepare, NCAR scientists are pinpointing vulnerable populations using tropical storm winds, census data, and flood maps.
Map of eastern U.S. showing vulnerability extending as far as Great Lakes
July 26, 2012
July 2012 promises to go down as the hottest month ever recorded in a number of U.S. locations.
St. Louis skyline at dusk
July 24, 2012
Heat and drought are punishing much of the United States right now, but there’s actually some good weather news to report. July 2012 is on track to produce fewer tornadoes than any July on record, and by a long shot.
Tornado near Cherokee, OK, on April 14, 2012
July 06, 2012
Cooler and drier air injected into a hurricane can put the brakes on its growth. Scientists are learning more about how this process works and how forecasters can watch for it.
Image showing the impact of ventilation on hurricane intensity
July 05, 2012
Attendees mingle at the poster session of the 2012 CESM Workshop in Breckenridge
July 02, 2012
A thunderstorm complex that toppled trees and knocked out power from Illinois to the Delaware coast brought to light a weather term with an obscure but intriguing history.
Derecho of June 29, 2012
May 31, 2012
A small, sophisticated instrument package developed at NCAR and dropped from aircraft has led to notable improvements in hurricane prediction. Now these devices are poised to deliver more data than ever, thanks to a new design and a remotely piloted NASA aircraft.
UCAR Magazine
May 31, 2012
A multisatellite observing system that was only a gleam in researchers’ eyes in the 1990s is now a key tool for monitoring Earth’s atmosphere. An ambitious follow-up project could yield up to ten times the data gathered by the current satellites.
UCAR Magazine
May 18, 2012
University students and faculty soon will have the chance to peer at day-to-day weather through the same lens used by National Weather Service meteorologists. A new version of the NWS’s workhorse graphics software will reach campuses through UCAR’s Unidata program.
Two forecasters at the National Weather Service test-drive a graphics system.
May 10, 2012
Thanks to deicing treatment and careful route selection, commercial pilots now avoid most of the threat that ice will encase critical parts of a plane. But another, more mysterious kind of in-flight icing hazard is now gaining attention.
Small plane flying near clouds
April 30, 2012
Scientists are targeting thunderstorms across the U.S. to discover what happens when clouds suck up air from Earth’s surface many miles into the atmosphere.
April 23, 2012
Many facets of everyday life, from boarding a plane to turning on the lights or driving down the highway, are becoming safer and more cost-effective with the help of technologies rooted in atmospheric science.
UCAR Magazine

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