March 19, 2014
The Climate Data Initiative announced by President Obama will enable new industries to use climate data to enhance long-range decisions and planning.
President's Open Data Initiative: Graphic showing binary code
January 24, 2014
A recent conference marked the 25th anniversary of a crucial international meeting, organized with support from UCAR, that brought together atmospheric sciences from Taiwan and mainland China for the first time in decades.
Science diplomacy: Group photo of meeting at Hong Kong Meteorological Society
January 13, 2014
In parts of California and Oregon, 2013 was the driest calendar year on record, with no sign of relief on the horizon. NCAR scientists are examining how water and energy use intersect across this drought-prone region and how the nexus could evolve in a future climate.
Drought puts California water supply at risk: Photo of Lake Mead, Nevada/Arizona
December 20, 2013
Techniques used in weather and climate forecasting are helping to predict peak flu outbreaks.
Predicting flu season: Photo of people wearing face masks
December 16, 2013
Some Native American communities in Alaska and Louisiana are planning to relocate entire villages because of climate change. What are the obstacles they face?
Moving a vlliage: Aerial view of Kivalina, Alaska, USA
November 20, 2013
Maximizing returns on financial investments depends on accurately accounting for weather and climate risks, new report concludes.
Finance and weather/climate risk: water-vapor satellite image from Midwest tornado outbreak, Nov 17, 2013
September 06, 2013
Two recently remodeled buildings on UCAR's Foothills campus have earned the highest possible rating from the U.S. Green Building Council for their sustainable design.
FLA Anthes Building
July 08, 2013
Drier ski slopes, reduced river flows, and increased wildfires can potentially discourage tourists from coming to Colorado. Should local officials and business leaders do more to plan for these impacts?
Drought and tourism: Photo of dry, cracked lakebed
May 15, 2013
Carbon dioxide concentrations in the atmosphere have crossed a major threshold: 400 parts per million. Here are five key points on how carbon dioxide is affecting Earth’s atmosphere and the role we're playing in it.
Carbon dioxide and the Keeling Curve: depiction of recent trends against blue sky
April 01, 2013
The new office will advocate for UCAR's member universities and also seek business opportunities with companies and foundations.
March 01, 2013
Broadcast meteorologists are a leading source of information about the atmosphere for the public, but many avoid mentioning global warming. New research finds barriers that may keep them from addressing the science of climate change on the air.
Weathercasters and climate change: Gary Lezak, KSHB, Kansas City
December 31, 2012
More than two days ahead of landfall, it was clear that Hurricane Sandy could bring higher water than New York and New Jersey had seen in decades. But for thousands of people in the area, the threat simply didn’t register. (Part 1 of 2)
Hurricane Sandy storm surge-wreckage of New Jersey roller coaster
October 04, 2012
The United States faces more varied weather risks than most nations on Earth, but we also have uniquely strong capabilities to confront these risks, thanks to decades of research conducted by government agencies, universities, and the private weather industry.
Cars buried in snow during March 2003 storm in Boulder County, CO
September 21, 2012
Innovative technologies are moving from the laboratory to the world at large through UCAR-facilitated teamwork.
Worker hoses commercial jet with deicing fluid from "cherry picker"
September 11, 2012
With its enormous computing capacity and speed, the new NCAR-Wyoming supercomputer will dramatically advance our understanding of Earth, helping to tackle major questions affecting our economy, health, and well-being.
solar panels
August 31, 2012
Researchers at NCAR are working with forecasters and emergency managers to unravel the communication challenges around hurricanes like Isaac, which had relatively weak winds but a strong storm surge.
UCAR Magazine
August 17, 2012
Studies show 63% of hurricane-related deaths occur inland. To help emergency managers prepare, NCAR scientists are pinpointing vulnerable populations using tropical storm winds, census data, and flood maps.
Map of eastern U.S. showing vulnerability extending as far as Great Lakes
August 13, 2012
Until supplies approach a trickle—or a torrent—public attention seldom focuses on water issues. But water is consistently Topic A for a wide-ranging group of researchers.
Illustration comparing total global water to much tinier total freshwater
August 13, 2012
States are having to make tough decisions regarding their water use and their interaction with water. NCAR scientists are involved in collaborative projects in Colorado, Louisiana, and Oklahoma to evaluate the long-term effects of today’s decisions.
UCAR Magazine
August 13, 2012
As rising temperatures melt glaciers around the world, scientists are tracking the changes and helping glacier-dependent regions adapt to a changing water supply.
Glacier in Alaska
August 13, 2012
An engineer and water policy expert, David Behar is one of the nation’s leading voices on ways to weave weather and climate knowledge into water management.
UCAR Magazine
July 26, 2012
July 2012 promises to go down as the hottest month ever recorded in a number of U.S. locations.
St. Louis skyline at dusk
July 18, 2012
A new meta-analysis highlights the shortcomings of vulnerability studies and points to a more integrative way forward.
Street scene in St. John, Antigua
May 14, 2012
The atmosphere has dealt Houston more than a few wild cards over the last few years, including two devastating tropical cyclones and unprecedented drought. While dealing with such weather threats, the nation's fourth largest city is also taking steps to tackle longer-term climate change.
Downtown Houston skyline at night
April 23, 2012
Many facets of everyday life, from boarding a plane to turning on the lights or driving down the highway, are becoming safer and more cost-effective with the help of technologies rooted in atmospheric science.
UCAR Magazine

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