July 09, 2014
Warmer temperatures, higher humidity, and less rain help lead to an earlier Lyme disease season, researchers have found. They have also identified several weather variables that can be used to predict the onset and peak of the next seasons.
Map showing areas of US Northeast and Midwest where Lyme disease is most common
December 20, 2013
Techniques used in weather and climate forecasting are helping to predict peak flu outbreaks.
Predicting flu season: Photo of people wearing face masks
November 30, 2012
What if we could use the data from fevered searches for flu information on the Web, plus humidity observations, to help predict the course of an outbreak? If new research lives up to its promise, we’ll soon be able to do just that.
Goolge and flu-Person getting the influenza vaccine via injection
November 27, 2012
By predicting the timing and severity of flu outbreaks, the new system can eventually help society better prepare for them.
Forecasting the flu - People wearing face masks
August 13, 2012
Until supplies approach a trickle—or a torrent—public attention seldom focuses on water issues. But water is consistently Topic A for a wide-ranging group of researchers.
Illustration comparing total global water to much tinier total freshwater
August 13, 2012
States are having to make tough decisions regarding their water use and their interaction with water. NCAR scientists are involved in collaborative projects in Colorado, Louisiana, and Oklahoma to evaluate the long-term effects of today’s decisions.
UCAR Magazine
April 23, 2012
Specially developed forecasts aim to help public health officials in Africa coordinate an international immunization program against meningitis, an often deadly disease associated with dry, dusty weather patterns.
UCAR Magazine
April 16, 2012
After an earthquake and tsunami damaged the Daiichi nuclear power plant in Fukushima, Japan, on March 11, 2011, an unknown quantity of radioactive material was released into the surrounding air and sea.
A map showing the coast of Japan.
October 03, 2011
A team that includes NCAR scientists Anne Boynard and Alex Guenther has found that the rate at which plant canopies emit isoprene, a volatile organic compound, is influenced by circadian rhythms.
Rain forest with lots of large ferns in the foreground.
September 06, 2011
A small but active group of discipline-crossing specialists are analyzing the response of disease transmission to temperature, moisture, and other atmospheric variables.
Aedes aegypti mosquito biting a human
May 03, 2011
Andrew Monaghan used to spend his time analyzing mathematical models of climate change in Antarctica. Now the NCAR scientist sits down with traditional healers in remote villages in Uganda.
UCAR Magazine
April 08, 2011
Alaska is among the fastest-warming places on Earth, with its interior region warming the most statewide. A study by NCAR’s Shannon McNeeley looks at the vulnerability to climate change of native rural communities.
Alaska Natives in a boat on the river with a moose they've just killed.
November 30, 2010
A team of scientists is tackling a scenario that is the stuff of Hollywood thrillers: What happens if a medium-sized asteroid strikes Earth? In particular, what if it crashes into the ocean? The question is not fanciful.
A gray, pock-marked asteroid in space.
August 25, 2010
NCAR scientists are collaborating with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to help fight plague in Uganda. Plague is believed to have been responsible for the Black Death pandemic that swept Europe in the 14th century, killing more than 25 million people.
Two rats crawling in a house.
August 09, 2010
In 1988, it was the spectre of Yellowstone National Park on fire. In 2003, it was the horror of thousands dying from heat in prosperous western Europe. The planet’s standout heat wave in 2010 plagued much of European Russia, including Moscow.
UCAR Magazine
May 20, 2010
A study led by NCAR visiting scientist Erich Fischer analyzes regional climate simulations to project where heat-wave-related health risks will increase in Europe as Earth’s climate warms.
A map of western Europe with hotter areas in red and orange.
February 15, 2009
Mercy Borbor-Cordova, NCAR's Advanced Study Program • Two things are critical for academic success, says Borbor-Cordova, who combines interests in environmental science and public policy. One is persistence. The other is what makes persistence possible: choosing subject(s) you really love.
Photograph of Mercy Borbor-Cordova
December 18, 2008
NCAR postdoctoral researcher Yongku Kim is using epidemiologic data to study the effects of ozone regulation on human health. He’s leading an assessment of how various regulatory standards for ozone may affect non-accidental mortality, including respiratory-related deaths during ozone season.
Freeway filled with cars
December 04, 2008
A new UCAR COMET Program course, Weather and Health, will help meteorologists and others broaden their understanding of the impacts of weather and climate on public health.
Winter weather scene.
November 19, 2008
UCAR, working with an international team of health and weather organizations, is launching a project this month to provide long-term weather forecasts to medical officials in Africa to help reduce outbreaks of meningitis.
Map showing meningitus belt in Africa from Senegal to Ethiopia
September 24, 2008
Research by NCAR scientist Mary Hayden underscores the risk of dengue fever and the growing threat of dengue hemorrhagic fever in the Rio Grande Valley between far south Texas and northeast Mexico.
A mosquito close-up, biting someone's flesh.
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