September 07, 2011
The HIPPO field project is enabling researchers to generate the first detailed 3-D mapping of the global distribution of gases and particles that affect Earth’s climate.
September 07, 2011
A balloon-borne instrument sailing in the Arctic stratosphere in June obtained some of the best observations to date on the high-speed, Sun-driven winds that howl through the thermosphere more than 100 kilometers (60 miles) above Earth.
UCAR Magazine
September 07, 2011
According to Rick Anthes, the human and economic costs of weather-related disasters would be far greater without NOAA’s satellite and radar observations and weather forecast models.
June 09, 2011
Prior to massive flooding early in 2011, long-term drought plagued the Australian state of Queensland . As part of a broad research program on cloud seeding, NCAR researchers have been steadily crunching data from a 2008–09 field project that looked into how to make the clouds drop more rain on the region.
classroom scene
May 06, 2011
The surfeit of snowfalls across the U.S. East Coast over the last two winters brought ample evidence of just how much the white stuff can vary from place to place—and how difficult it is to assess accurately.
UCAR Magazine
May 06, 2011
On 17–18 January, staff from the German Aerospace Center got to compare their new Gulfstream G550 jet, dubbed HALO, with its closest counterpart—the NSF/NCAR Gulfstream V, called HIAPER, which debuted in 2005.
HALO and HIAPER staff with their respective aircraft
March 08, 2011
The biggest upgrade to the U.S. weather-radar network in 15 years gets rolling this winter with a minimum of fanfare—debuting under the radar, as it were. But the new capabilities should get their fair share of attention in the long run.
Dual-polarization radars sending out signals
February 10, 2011
A new study by NCAR scientists looks at the accuracy of snow gauges. Making accurate measurements of snowfall is critical for weather forecasting, climate studies, and hydrology. But a combination of snow gauge geometry and weather conditions can lead to systematic measurement errors.
A close-up image of a snowflake.
November 03, 2010
International collaboration has always been at the heart of COSMIC, a six-satellite network that intercepts GPS signals to measure weather, climate, and space weather variables. Now one of the leading university collaborators on COSMIC, the University of Graz, is UCAR’s latest international affiliate.
UCAR president Rick Anthes and representatives from University of Graz
November 02, 2010
It’s not exactly a moment for celebration, but when a tropical storm is born in the Atlantic, millions of people learn about it quickly. As with any birth, though, a great deal has to happen in just the right way before a tropical storm is christened.
NASA’s DC-8 shuttled to St. Croix for a flight into the remnants of Gaston
July 20, 2010
Researchers and aircraft will search for secrets of hurricane formation above the tropical Atlantic Ocean.
Hurricane Felix satellite image
June 17, 2010
In the spring of 2009, researchers on the Second Verification of the Origins of Rotation in Tornadoes Experiment (VORTEX2) field project set out across the Great Plains to study tornadoes, but that’s not the only phenomenon they observed.
A truck driving down an empty highway with a menacing storm in the background.
June 10, 2010
NCAR’s Coronal Multichannel Polarimeter (CoMP) found a new home early this year on Hawaii’s Mauna Loa, a high-elevation paradise for astronomical observers.
NCAR Mauna Loa Solar Observatory
June 09, 2010
Cirrus clouds—thin strands or sheets usually composed of ice crystals—form high in the atmosphere. A new study led by NCAR scientist Steve Massie employs satellite technology to observe the clouds in greater detail than before.
Thin, wispy cirrus clouds in the sky.
June 09, 2010
Rick Anthes, UCAR president, examines the unprecedented boom in the atmospheric sciences after World War II.
Earthrise from Apollo 10, December 1968
April 28, 2010
The collaborative international project, involving scientists from NCAR and other organizations, may ultimately improve tornado forecasting.
February 25, 2010
The greater Salt Lake City area is known for harboring some of the most polluted air in the country during the winter. A team of NCAR researchers is gearing up to collaborate on a study of the winter weather inversions that cause the city's poor air quality.
Salt Lake City skyline obscured by air pollution.
February 16, 2010
NCAR and university researchers are collaborating with the U.S. Department of Agriculture and Federal Aviation Administration to study how bird-detecting radar at airports could help prevent dangerous airplane bird strikes.
A crane on the broken windshield of a helicoptor.
January 14, 2010
A team led by NCAR's Jim Smith has found that aminium salts make up as much as half of the mass of newly formed particles in places as diverse as Atlanta, Mexico City, northeast Colorado, and Finland.
Cattle on a feedlot.
December 10, 2009
A collaboration of scientists that includes UCAR's John Braun is pioneering a new technique for using GPS satellite signals to measure snow depth as well as soil and vegetation moisture.
Marshall Field Site
October 15, 2009
Preliminary research at NCAR suggests that biological particles may contribute significantly to the mass of organic carbon stored in atmospheric aerosols. The study is an important step for scientists.
Christine Wiedinmyer taking measurements at Storm Peak Laboratory.
September 14, 2009
In 2006, a team of NCAR researchers convened in Mexico City for MIRAGE, a study of the chemical and physical transformation of air pollution in urban areas and its impact on air quality, ecosystems, and climate. Another MIRAGE field campaign kicks off this month, this time in Shanghai, China's largest city.
Factories on the shores of the lower Yangtze River in China.
September 11, 2009
This spring the second Verification of the Origins of Rotation in Tornadoes Experiment (VORTEX2, or V2) captured one tornado in unprecedented detail, as well as a number of potentially tornadic thunderstorms that never made the grade.
A W-band radar capturing the end stages of the 5 June tornado
August 27, 2009
A team of NCAR researchers led by Jacob Fugal is developing and testing a specialized instrument that uses digital holography to measure tiny cloud droplets.
HOLODEC 2 installed on Gulfstream V aircraft.
July 28, 2009
A new study led by NCAR scientist David Edwards is the first to apply the concept of Observing System Simulation Experiments to chemical weather (predicting pollution events and variability in the atmosphere’s chemical composition).
Pollution

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