November 14, 2013
Using new satellite data, scientists have developed a technique that may produce continually updated, 24-hour predictions of wildfire growth throughout the lifetime of long-lived blazes.
Forecasts of long-lived wildfires: June 2010 fire in Great Sand Dunes National Park
October 01, 2013
Though Hurricane Sandy struck almost a year ago, the fearsome cyclone lives on within the circuits of supercomputers that are replicating its unusual evolution and track.
Supercomputer visualization of Hurricane Sandy, including near-surface winds and radar reflectivity
April 03, 2013
A diversity of science by researchers at NCAR and across the university community is emerging from the new system.
March 04, 2013
A major winter storm is threatening the Washington, D.C., area this week, on the heels of record-setting snowfalls and blizzard conditions in several parts of the United States last month. Are these onslaughts catching people off guard?
Predicting snowstorms: Accumulations from blizzard photographed on February 9, 2013, in Billerica, Massachusetts
July 02, 2012
A thunderstorm complex that toppled trees and knocked out power from Illinois to the Delaware coast brought to light a weather term with an obscure but intriguing history.
Derecho of June 29, 2012
October 26, 2011
NCAR scientists have performed one of the most detailed simulations ever of a massive tornado outbreak. They simulated two waves of tornadic storms that occurred on April 27,2011 in Alabama, the deadliest U.S. tornado day since 1925.
Satellite image of southeastern U.S. with swirling storms.
May 06, 2011
Rick Anthes, UCAR president, looks at atmospheric predictability in general and presents some remarkable examples of recent successful experimental predictions.
Cyclone Nargis in Bay of Bengal
March 02, 2011
Karen Akerlof at George Mason University has analyzed the treatment of climate modeling in the mass media. Are models a missing piece in climate change journalism?
Karen Akerlof, George Mason University
February 22, 2011
Last year, a team of NCAR scientists verified that the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF) can be used to depict seasonal snowfall in Colorado with a high degree of accuracy. Now the team is using WRF to forecast future snowfall.
Mountains covered in snow.
November 02, 2010
UCAR president Rick Anthes says the good forecasts of Hurricane Earl were not unusual. The accuracy of hurricane track forecasts has increased steadily over the years.
Hurricane Earl
September 14, 2010
Talea Mayo, University of Texas at Austin • No two days are the same for this student of computational and applied mathematics. She's working to improve hurricane storm surge predictions by focusing on how data gets added, or "assimilated," into a forecasting model.
Talea Mayo works with Lee Mauldin on cluster-CIMS instrument
September 09, 2010
A team of scientists led by NCAR’s Keith Oleson has incorporated urban areas into a global climate model. The development is important because most models used for predicting future climate change do not account for the urban “heat island” effect.
Two satellite views of Atlanta that show urban heat island effect.
August 18, 2010
The Community Earth System Model helps scientists shed light on some of the critical mysteries of global warming.
June 09, 2010
Rick Anthes, UCAR president, examines the unprecedented boom in the atmospheric sciences after World War II.
Earthrise from Apollo 10, December 1968
June 08, 2010
It’s been a busy spring for community climate modeling at NCAR. One major release pushes the veteran CCSM forward. Another release is on the way: the Community Earth System Model, which brings a new paradigm into the mix.
UCAR Magazine
March 19, 2010
A new study has verified that the Weather Research and Forecasting model can depict seasonal snowfall in Colorado with a high degree of accuracy.
Mountains with snow.
January 08, 2010
NCAR scientist Natasha Flyer is using an innovative method known as radial basis function (RBF) to model simple physical processes in the geosciences. The research is poised to offer a new way of solving equations that could significantly improve models used by atmospheric and solar scientists.
Two sperical images side-by-side.
July 16, 2009
By simulating 8,000 years of climate, a team led by scientists from the University of Wisconsin–Madison and NCAR has found a new explanation for the last major period of global warming, which occurred about 14,500 years ago.
Image of Earth showing temperature increases, researched by TraCE-21000 project
June 18, 2009
In a breakthrough that will help scientists unlock mysteries of the Sun and its impacts on Earth, an international team of scientists led by NCAR has created the first-ever comprehensive computer model of sunspots.
Color visualization of a sunspot's umbra and penumbra
May 20, 2009
A new technique developed at NCAR will help asteroseismologists learn about stars from their oscillations, or “starquakes.” These variations in the brightness of stars reveal information about their internal structures.
Kepler satellite orbiting the Sun
May 11, 2009
One of the challenges for global climate modelers is accurately simulating cloud cover and its changes over time. This is vital for projecting future temperatures, rainfall, and other aspects of global and regional climate change.
Aerial photo of cumulus clouds
May 07, 2009
Using a highly efficient modeling technique, Pablo Ortiz (University of Granada) and Piotr Smolarkiewicz (ESSL/MMM) have simulated the role of winds in forming sand dunes and sandholes.
Sand dunes in the Atacama Desert
April 14, 2009
NCAR researchers are looking at how new generations of super-fast Graphical Processing Units (GPUs) and multicore chips, such as the Cell Broadband Engine, can be used in atmospheric models.
Sky with towering cumulus clouds
March 11, 2009
NCAR scientists are working on a bigger, bolder version of WACCM (the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model), called WACCM-eXtension, or WACCM-X for short. The enhanced version extends the model to an altitude of about 310 miles.
Coronal mass ejection
March 09, 2009
A team of researchers that includes NCAR’s Synte Peacock and Frank Bryan has carried out the first-ever century-long global ocean simulations with high enough resolution to capture mesoscale eddies.
Ocean wave

Pages

Subscribe to