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Supercomputing with Yellowstone - Multimedia Gallery

October 12, 2012

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Scientific visualizations:  Video  |  Images 
Photos:  Supercomputer & facility


 

Scientific Visualizations Using Supercomputing - Video

 

  

Coupled Weather-Fire Simulation of the Esperanza Wildfire. This fire-behavior simulation reproduces the October 2006 Esperanza Fire near Cabazon, California. For description and credits please see the YouTube description. (©UCAR. This video is freely available for media & nonprofit use.) 

 

 

Intense Storm Observed during the ERICA Field Campaign. The low-pressure center modeled here, called an extratropical cyclone, was observed over the central North Atlantic Ocean in early January 1989. For description and credits please see the YouTube description. (©UCAR. This video is freely available for media & nonprofit use.)

 

 

Solar Magnetic "Tornado." Computer modeling based on a discovery made in 2012. A virtual camera travels around, above, and into a funnel of rotating solar magnetism.  For description and credits please see the YouTube description. (©UCAR. This video is freely available for media & nonprofit use.)



Scientific Visualizations Using Supercomputing - Images

NCAR-Wyoming supercomputing facility

Sunspot visualization. The interface between a sunspot's umbra (dark center) and penumbra (lighter outer region) shows a complex structure with narrow, almost horizontal (lighter to white) filaments embedded in a background having a more vertical (darker to black) magnetic field. Farther out, extended patches of horizontal field dominate. In a first, NCAR scientists and colleagues modeled this complex structure in a comprehensive 3D computer simulation, giving scientists an unprecedented glimpse below the visible surface to understand a sunspot's underlying physical processes. more about this study >   (©UCAR, image courtesy Matthias Rempel, NCAR.)

 
CCSM4 model visualization
Earth’s climate system. This image depicts a single month from a simulation of the 20th century by the NCAR-based Community Climate System Model (version 4). The CCSM4 is one of the world’s most powerful computer models for simulating the complex interactions of Earth’s climate system, including the atmosphere, oceans, sea ice, and land surface. This image captures wind directions, ocean surface temperatures, and sea ice concentrations. (©UCAR, image courtesy Gary Strand, NCAR.)



Photos of the NWSC: Supercomputer and facility

Fish-eye view of a few of Yellowstone supercomputer's racks
A fish-eye view of some of the Yellowstone supercomputer's 100 racks. An iconic scene from Yellowstone National Park is featured mosaic-style on the ends of each rack. The image by Michael Medford, licensed to National Geographic, shows Fountain Geyser. (©UCAR. Photo by Carlye Calvin. This image is freely available for media & nonprofit use.)
 
Side view of a few of Yellowstone's 100 computer racks
Side view of some of the Yellowstone supercomputer's 100 racks. An iconic scene from Yellowstone National Park is featured mosaic-style on the ends of each rack. The image by Michael Medford, licensed to National Geographic, centers on Fountain Geyser. (©UCAR. Photo by Carlye Calvin. This image is freely available for media & nonprofit use.)
NCAR-Wyoming Supercomputing Center exterior
The building housing the NCAR-Wyoming Supercomputing Center in Cheyenne, Wyoming, officially opened on October 15, 2012. (©UCAR. Photo by Carlye Calvin. This image is freely available for media & nonprofit use.)
 
View of the NWSC Visitor Center
The NWSC visitor center features views of the Yellowstone system and five stations scattered throughout the lobby that explore the many facets of supercomputing and related science. (©UCAR. Photo by Carlye Calvin. This image is freely available for media & nonprofit use.)
 
A view of a computer operator at left with some of the Yellowstone cabinets
Housed in a set of 100 interconnected cabinets, the Yellowstone system includes more than 70,000 processors, as well as high-performance bandwidth, memory, and visualization functions to transmit, store, and view the results. (©UCAR. Photo by Carlye Calvin. This image is freely available for media & nonprofit use.)
 
Yellow and orange cables bundled atop the computer racks
Over a dozen miles of cable permit Yellowstone's tens of thousands of processors and other key components to interact with each other. (©UCAR. Photo by Carlye Calvin. This image is freely available for media & nonprofit use.)
Pipes, fans, and other components of computing room cooling system

Beneath the floor of the supercomputing rooms lies a vast, 10-foot high utility space, the key to the facility’s flexible, energy efficient design. The electrical supply and cooling systems, including the fans at right in this photo, can be positioned and controlled for optimal energy use, and air can be circulated as needed to computing systems and servers. (©UCAR. Photo by Carlye Calvin. This image is freely available for media & nonprofit use.)

 

 
Some of the pipes and other systems in the NWSC's mechanical room

Some of the NWSC's complex mechanical systems, which were designed with performance, flexibility, and energy efficiency in mind.  (©UCAR. Photo by Carlye Calvin. This image is freely available for media & nonprofit use.)

 

*Media & nonprofit use of images: Except where otherwise indicated, media and nonprofit use permitted with credit as indicated above and compliance with UCAR's terms of use. Find more images in the UCAR Digital Image Library.

The University Corporation for Atmospheric Research manages the National Center for Atmospheric Research under sponsorship by the National Science Foundation. Any opinions, findings and conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.