Just Published

September 30, 2015
The HOLODEC instrument uses a laser light to take a 3D image of the droplets inside a cloud.
The HOLODEC mounted to the wing of a research aircraft.
September 08, 2015
Research may shed light on why some clusters of thunderstorms spin up into tropical storms while others dissipate.
Hurricanes development: satellite image of Tropical Storm Karl in 2010
July 08, 2015
The research could move scientists closer toward projecting weather patterns in Europe months to years in advance.
1,000 years of the North Atlantic Oscillation: Map shows NAO conditions in negative phase
June 17, 2015
The SUMMA model lets users make individual decisions about how to treat a vast range of variables. This customizing allows users to mimic existing models or create something entirely new.
Hydrologic model lets users decide: side-by-side grid and basin maps
April 28, 2015
For the first time, an NCAR-led team of scientists have found a way to simulate the propagation of gravity waves toward space. The resulting visualization is mesmerizing to watch.
Invisible waves visualized: still from high-resolution simulation of north-south winds about 60 miles above Earth
April 20, 2015
A new study estimates how much carbon dioxide is likely to be absorbed by plants by the end of the century.
Predicting plant uptake of carbon: photo of trees and ferns in Costa Rica
January 07, 2015
Scientists find unequivocal evidence that thunderstorms move ozone from the stratosphere down toward Earth's surface, affecting air quality and climate.
Thunderstorms and ozone:  A rotating supercell thunderstorm moves across northeast Colorado.
November 05, 2014
A circulation change has boosted concentrations of hydrogen chloride (HCl), the main reservoir of chlorine in the stratosphere, by several percent over much of the Northern Hemisphere since 2007.
Ozone concentrations above the Arctic in March 2011
September 12, 2014
In a surprising finding, a research team concludes that the dominant "detergent" in the atmosphere is equally abundant in the northern and southern hemispheres.
View of Antarctic sky from NSF/NCAR HIAPER research jet
September 08, 2014
Ozone pollution in India is damaging millions of tons of the country’s major crops, according to a new study by an international team of researchers. The pollution caused losses of more than $1 billion in a single year, destroying enough food to feed an estimated 94 million people.
Ground-level ozone's toll: A traffic jam in Delhi, India
September 08, 2014
If today’s tools for multiyear climate forecasting had been available in the 1990s, they would have revealed that a slowdown in global warming was likely on the way, according to new research.
Decadal prediction: Map showing trends in sea surface temperature
August 20, 2014
A case study indicates that the COSMIC microsatellite system can significantly improve predictions of tropical cyclones by using GPS radio occultation to observe remote regions of the atmosphere.
Cyclone Gonu on NASA/MODIS satellite, 6/4/07
August 13, 2014
For millions of people, El Niño or La Niña indicates whether they’re likely to face unusually warm, cold, wet, or dry conditions over the coming winter. A new modeling study pins down the process that apparently determines why La Niña events often last twice as long as typical El Niño events—a result with major implications for seasonal predictions.
Sea surface temperatures during 2007–08 La Niña
August 05, 2014
A leading goal of solar scientists is to improve predictions of the Sun's approximately 11-year cycle. New research led by scientists from NCAR and Sweden shows how solar predictions can borrow from weather forecasting techniques in order to predict the timing and extent of the solar cycle.
Depiction of model-produced meridional circulation beneath solar surface
July 22, 2014
Scientists have found that internal variability can make one season twice as active as another, even when large-scale hurricane-shaping elements are unchanged. The research suggests that seasonal hurricane forecasts could be improved by conveying the amount of unavoidable uncertainty in the outlook.
June 25, 2014
California will likely experience more large fires in forested areas this century because of rising temperatures and changes in precipitation along with development patterns, new research finds. The blazes could increase some types of fire-generated air pollution by more than half.
Pollution, fires, warming west: A fire burns on Camp Pendleton, California
May 07, 2014
Geophysical Research Letters, a leading journal in Earth science, is toasting its 40th anniversary this month with an editor-picked retrospective collection of 40 papers, including several with authors from NCAR.
Photo of NCAR scientist Marika Holland explaining changes in Arctic sea ice extent
April 10, 2014
Climate change will reduce water availability during dry seasons and increase it during wet seasons around the globe, new research suggests. It also finds there will be large regional variations in water-related impacts.
Water: too much, too little - Image shows effects of major drought on plants across U.S. on June 24, 2011
March 12, 2014
Increased Pacific winds are sending excess heat into the deep ocean and likely playing a role in the current hiatus in global warming.
March 03, 2014
A nuclear exchange, even if limited to one region, would have severe atmospheric impacts.
Arctic sea ice: Regional nuclear conflict could lead to extended global cooling
February 19, 2014
Scientists link coal, oil, and biomass to a layer of sulfates high above Asia.
Pollution above Asia: Layer in stratosphere may originate from global sources
December 20, 2013
Techniques used in weather and climate forecasting are helping to predict peak flu outbreaks.
Predicting flu season: Photo of people wearing face masks
December 16, 2013
Some Native American communities in Alaska and Louisiana are planning to relocate entire villages because of climate change. What are the obstacles they face?
Moving a vlliage: Aerial view of Kivalina, Alaska, USA
September 20, 2013
Parts of the central United States may become more prone to summertime drying than earlier thought, based on new simulations of climate change that involve both global and regional climate models.
Drought-parched bed of Teller Lake, east of Boulder, Colorado
August 26, 2013
A grand solar minimum would slow global warming but not stop it.
sunrise over the Atlantic


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