In Brief

Climate simulations for late 21st-century temperature from different scenarios: IPCC AR5, Ch. 12, FAQ 12.1
June 03, 2014
Researchers are finding new ways to work with aspects of climate change that are surprisingly linear, an approach that could help save time and money in future climate research while providing a richer range of information to help guide policy.
Sources of airborne wind energy: Forecast-model depiction of winds at 850-mb level on 1/30/13
May 28, 2014
What if all the energy needed by society existed just a mile or two above our heads? NCAR, the University of Delaware, and the energy firm Garrad Hassan have begun examining where the strongest winds are and how much electricity they may be able to generate.
Effects of gravity waves: Noctilucent clouds over Helsinki, Finland, on July 2, 2012
May 21, 2014
A field project this June and July will study gravity waves, towering atmospheric features little-known to the public. Novel instruments to be deployed for the international DEEPWAVE project, based in New Zealand, will provide an unprecedented view of gravity waves, a major shaper of atmospheric variability at multiple heights.
El Niño’s high-altitude highway: Map showing temperature anomalies during El Niño and La Niña years with sudden stratospheric warmings, 1958-2013
May 14, 2014
El Niño exerts its global impact through two different atmospheric pathways, one located miles above the other—a finding that may help bolster regional climate prediction.
Flash flooding on Boulder's Bear Creek during record rainfall, 9/12/13
May 07, 2014
Two one-hour webinars on May 20 and 21 will feature nationally recognized hydrometeorologist Matt Kelsch on the science behind flash flooding, including the conditions that lead to extreme rainfall and what happens to all that rain after it falls.
Predicting solar superstorms: image of coronal mass ejection on August 31, 2012
April 30, 2014
While the current peak in the 11-year cycle of sunspot activity is on the weak side, the Sun might still produce a major storm at any point. The most dangerous storms are most likely during the waning part of the solar cycle, which will unfold later this decade.
Aviation safety: Microburst looms near Denver's Stapleton International Airport, July 6, 1984
April 01, 2014
It takes a sharp eye to find something positive in the wreckage of the worst swarm of U.S. tornadoes on record: the 1974 Jumbo Outbreak. Millions of Americans are safer in the air because of Fujita's subsequent analysis of microbursts and tools developed by NCAR and collaborators.
Damage from California mudslides during 1997–98 El Nino
March 18, 2014
Why seasonal forecasting can’t tell us with certainty what to expect this summer—and why we might soon have a stronger sense of what late 2014 and early 2015 are likely to bring to large parts of the globe.
Science diplomacy: Group photo of meeting at Hong Kong Meteorological Society
January 24, 2014
A recent conference marked the 25th anniversary of a crucial international meeting, organized with support from UCAR, that brought together atmospheric sciences from Taiwan and mainland China for the first time in decades.
NSF/NCAR Gulfstream V at HIPPO field project in Alaska
November 05, 2013
NCAR is helping to assure that atmospheric field campaigns will pay off for years to come by maintaining one of the world’s largest archives of data from observational studies.

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The University Corporation for Atmospheric Research manages the National Center for Atmospheric Research under sponsorship by the National Science Foundation. Any opinions, findings and conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.

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