In Brief

March 11, 2011
One of the most enduring mysteries in solar physics is why the Sun’s outer atmosphere, or corona, is millions of degrees hotter than its surface. Now scientists believe they have discovered a major source of hot gas that replenishes the corona.
A close-up of the solar limb
March 10, 2011
Snowstorms have been a dime a dozen across much of the central and eastern United States over the last few months, but four of them got special scrutiny.
Grad students and Doppler on Wheels unit
March 08, 2011
The biggest upgrade to the U.S. weather-radar network in 15 years gets rolling this winter with a minimum of fanfare—debuting under the radar, as it were. But the new capabilities should get their fair share of attention in the long run.
Dual-polarization radars sending out signals
March 04, 2011
Atmospheric science has lost one of the last living links to its formative era. Joachim Kuettner—the eminent researcher, administrator, field project leader, and glider pilot—died on 24 February at the age of 101.
Joachim Kuettner on a gliding expedition, 1950s
March 01, 2011
No stranger to NCAR or to observational meteorology, Vanda Grubišić (University of Vienna) will take the helm of NCAR’s Earth Observing Laboratory (EOL) on 1 July.
Vanda Grubišić
March 01, 2011
When climate change leaped into global consciousness more than 20 years ago, there was no doubt that sea levels would rise, but the main worry was how those rising seas would affect civilization, not on how the oceans themselves might be transformed.
Sampling coral in the Pacific near Kiribati
February 25, 2011
Long-time UCAR president Richard Anthes announced on 25 February that he plans to step down at the end of 2011. Appointed to his position in 1988, Anthes is the longest serving of the five UCAR presidents since the organization was established in 1960.
Rick Anthes
November 04, 2010
In a bid to unlock longstanding mysteries of the Sun, including the impacts on Earth of its 11-year cycle, a team of scientists from NCAR, France, and Spain has successfully probed a distant star.
Savita
November 03, 2010
International collaboration has always been at the heart of COSMIC, a six-satellite network that intercepts GPS signals to measure weather, climate, and space weather variables. Now one of the leading university collaborators on COSMIC, the University of Graz, is UCAR’s latest international affiliate.
UCAR president Rick Anthes and representatives from University of Graz
November 02, 2010
As part of NCAR and UCAR 50th anniversary festivities, university members and affiliates attended a gala dinner on 5 October at the University of Colorado’s Stadium Club.
Thomas Malone at UCAR 50th anniversary dinner
November 02, 2010
There was no gold medal, no podium ceremony, and definitely no tears from the losers on 30 July, but there was a new national champion. On that date, NOAA proclaimed that a South Dakota hailstone had surpassed all contenders in both size and weight.
Charles Knight with 2010 Vivian, SD, hailstone
November 02, 2010
Blossoming interest in geoengineering research over the last few years has ripened into a deeper consideration of the topic by scientists, policymakers, and the public. This interest has been boosted by a relative lack of action on mitigating climate change.
Eruption of Mount Pinatubo, 1991
November 02, 2010
It’s not exactly a moment for celebration, but when a tropical storm is born in the Atlantic, millions of people learn about it quickly. As with any birth, though, a great deal has to happen in just the right way before a tropical storm is christened.
NASA’s DC-8 shuttled to St. Croix for a flight into the remnants of Gaston
November 01, 2010
Richard Anthes suspected something was up when the UCAR Board of Trustees, minus himself, trooped to the stage at the institution’s 50th birthday dinner on 5 October. “When they started showing photos of my childhood, I really knew something was coming.”
Richard Anthes
July 21, 2010
One of the most influential and colorful atmospheric scientists of modern times passed from the scene unexpectedly on 19 July. Stephen Schneider died of an apparent heart attack while on board a flight from Sweden to London.
Stephen Schneider outdoors at NCAR in 1978
June 17, 2010
More than 100 people assembled on the outskirts of Cheyenne, Wyoming, on 15 June for the official kickoff of construction on the NCAR–Wyoming Supercomputing Center.
NWSC groundbreaking
June 10, 2010
New, more interactive and versatile uses of the Web are beginning to enable profound changes in the entire life cycle of scientific publications. Among these developments, one that is currently looming large in many scientists’ minds is open access.
Hand holding key
June 10, 2010
Between 1969 and 1971, NCAR scientist John Eddy set out to archive an important part of the history of both photography and astronomy. Eddy collected more than 100 pictures of total solar eclipses taken from the late 1800s into the mid-1900s.
Alice Lecinski, Phil Judge, and Don Kolinski
June 10, 2010
They’ve been called “crop circles in the sky.” Across the world, sightings of oddly circular holes within cloud layers—dubbed hole-punch clouds by scientists—have triggered bemusement and speculation.
Andy Heymsfield
June 10, 2010
NCAR’s Coronal Multichannel Polarimeter (CoMP) found a new home early this year on Hawaii’s Mauna Loa, a high-elevation paradise for astronomical observers.
NCAR Mauna Loa Solar Observatory
June 09, 2010
In January 2010, Roger Wakimoto was asked to direct NCAR. “Roger is a world-class scientist and administrator with broad knowledge of both the atmospheric sciences and the university community that NCAR serves,” says UCAR president Richard Anthes.
Roger Wakimoto at VORTEX2
June 08, 2010
The mysteries of the atmosphere are compelling enough to bring many into the fold of atmospheric and related science. But if you’re a first-generation college student from an underrepresented group, other factors may steer you away, according to UCAR’s Raj Pandya.
Marina LaGrave
June 08, 2010
It’s been a busy spring for community climate modeling at NCAR. One major release pushes the veteran CCSM forward. Another release is on the way: the Community Earth System Model, which brings a new paradigm into the mix.
UCAR Magazine
June 08, 2010
During the stormy summer of 2005, hurricanes Katrina and Rita raised concerns about the potential effects of global warming on tropical cyclones. At the same time, the Amazon rainforest was experiencing one of its most intense droughts of the last century.
River and rainforest in Amazonia
March 04, 2010
Atmospheric scientists around the world are mourning the loss of Joanne Simpson. The 87-year-old researcher, who upended stereotypes and made landmark contributions to meteorology, died on 4 March in Washington, DC.
Joanne Simpson

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