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October 14, 2014
A cutting-edge wind and solar energy forecasting system that has saved electricity consumers $40 million to date has won a prestigious 2014 Colorado Governor’s Award.
Solar panels being installed on U.S. DOE building
October 7, 2014
U.S. atmospheric researchers and counterparts at the India Ministry of Earth Sciences will collaborate to advance weather forecasting and technology under a new agreement.
UCAR, India join forces for research. Photo: A farm in India, misty hills in background

A new study by Florida State University researchers demonstrates a different way of projecting a hurricane’s strength and intensity that could give the public a better idea of a storm’s potential for destruction.

In 1964, the Beatles took the world by storm, Lyndon Johnson won his second term as President—and NASA launched the first of seven Nimbus spacecraft to study Earth from space.

August 31, 1964 The First Picture From NASA Nimbus 1 Satellite
October 22, 2014 | Among the world’s varied climates, two populous midlatitude areas get an especially big helping of large-scale extreme rainfall: eastern Asia and central-to-eastern North America. Experts from both continents met at NCAR on September 15–18 to discuss promising avenues of research that could lead to improvements in predicting hurricanes, floods, and other phenomena affecting billions of people.
October 8, 2014 | Building a large-scale wind farm or solar power plant involves an enormous investment in time and money. Requirements include exploring prime sites for capturing energy from wind or sunshine, purchasing the land, undergoing a potentially lengthy permitting process, and installing costly infrastructure. Not surprisingly, utilities expect such facilities to last many decades. But what if, years from now, changes in climate caused some of the wind or sunshine to shift away from major facilities?
Turbines at Cedar Creek Wind Farm in northeast Colorado
September 12, 2014 | In a finding that could alter how scientists quantify emissions of certain pollutants, a new study in Nature concludes that the self-cleaning power of the atmosphere does not differ substantially between the northern and southern hemispheres. The finding was surprising, as model simulations generally show that the hydroxyl molecule (OH)—the dominant “detergent” of the atmosphere that removes many pollutants by oxidizing them—is more common in the Northern Hemisphere.
View of Antarctic sky from NSF/NCAR HIAPER research jet
September 9, 2014 | Ozone pollution in India is damaging millions of tons of the country’s major crops, according to a new study by an international team of researchers. The pollution caused losses of more than $1 billion in a single year, destroying enough food to feed tens of millions of people living in poverty in the country.
Ground-level ozone's toll: A traffic jam in Delhi, India
August 27, 2014 | Almost a year after Colorado’s deadly and destructive floods of September 2013, a group of NCAR scientists has just completed testing an innovative new system for detecting and predicting torr
Front Range disaster: flood waters in south Boulder, Colorado, September 12, 2013
July 30, 2014 | Emperor penguins, the large, charismatic birds known from their frequent film and TV appearances, are in danger.
Penguins and climate change: emperor penguins and chicks at Snow Hill Island, Antarctica, October 2009