January 21, 2015
The affiliation establishes a long-term collaboration between UCAR's science education center and the Smithsonian.
UCAR named Smithsonian Affiliate: Kids experiment with cloud exhibit
December 30, 2014
A new study led by NASA and NCAR shows that tropical forests may be absorbing far more human-emitted carbon dioxide than many scientists thought.
tropical rain forests and CO2: Serra do Mar Paranaense, Brazil

While studying a ground-nesting bird population near El Reno, Okla., a University of Oklahoma-led research team found that stress during a severe weather outbreak in May 2013, had manifested itself into malformations in the growing feathers of young birds.

Grasshopper sparrow in the Columbia Bottom Conservation Area, Missouri.  Photograph by Andy Reago and Chrissy McClarren.

It is no surprise that Arctic sea ice is thinning. What is new is just how long, how steadily, and how much it has declined. 

On June 5, 2001, the USS Scranton surfaced at the North Pole through almost four feet of ice. The new study uses submarine records to help track decades of thinning. U.S. Navy
March 11, 2015 | Air pollution in the United States costs thousands of lives and billions of dollars every year. But what if forecasters could issue detailed air quality forecasts days in advance? Such forecasts may be coming. NCAR and its research partners recently received a $1.3 million grant from NASA to develop the capability to produce detailed 48-hour forecasts of ground-level ozone and fine particulate matter.
Forecasting air quality: photo of Los Angeles in summer smog
February 9, 2015 | While some folks were looking to Punxsutawney Phil on Groundhog Day, scientists were learning about the weather through a different route: flying a highly advanced cloud radar on its maiden voyage above a major northeast storm.
The powerful HIAPER Cloud Radar, mounted in the white pod, flies over a major Nor'easter
January 7, 2015 | A new study in Geophysical Research Letters offers for the first time unequivocal evidence that large storms move significant amounts of ozone from the stratosphere down to the troposphere, the lowest part of the atmosphere. The finding has implications for global climate because tropospheric ozone is a powerful greenhouse gas as well as a pollutant that affects human health and the environment.
Thunderstorms and ozone:  A rotating supercell thunderstorm moves across northeast Colorado.
November 5, 2014 | Concentrations of hydrogen chloride (HCl), the main reservoir of chlorine in the stratosphere, have increased by several percent over much of the Northern Hemisphere since 2007, a new study finds. The observed buildup in HCl is attributed to a temporary shift in atmospheric circulation, rather than to any increased emission of the chlorine-containing, ozone-destroying compounds that are banned by the Montreal Protocol.
Ozone concentrations above the Arctic in March 2011
February 24, 2015 | Earth’s weather extends into higher regions of the atmosphere than the one we inhabit. But the influence of those regions has been challenging to chart until recently.
Impacts of atmospheric waves: Photo of EISCAT Svalbard incoherent scatter radar
Matt Kelsch • January 28, 2014 | As this week’s blizzard rumbled toward the U.S. Northeast, many media outlets posted the top-10 snow events for major cities.
Snowfall measurement: cars buried under lots of snow